Subaru Outback Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all, I'm new here and doing a lot of research towards purchasing an 05-08 OBXT. I've read so many turbo horror stories, and most of the cars I'm seeing to buy are going to be 70-100k miles with various maintenance records. Since I'm pretty much locked into buying a car with that many miles, seems like I'm going to be running some high risks that car is going to have a turbo time bomb ready to blow in the near future.

I was thinking maybe to improve my odds of a car that won't implode, I should find the best condition/maintained one I can afford, have my inspection guy pull the pan and verify clean oil, and if ok and I buy the car... making it first priority to trade out the turbo for an aftermarket (say a 16G or similar) and improving the oil setup. I know the headgasket could still go and nothing is certain, but does anyone think this might be an effective way to help prevent a turbo kaboom in a high mileage OBXT?
 

·
Meh.
I has wagons.
Joined
·
12,372 Posts
Synthetic oil changed no longer than 4-5k miles. (Subaru recommends 3750 now).

Keep the ATF (Subaru ATF HP fluid) in good shape.

Keep the coolant in good shape.

Run premium fuel only.
 

·
Premium Member
(formerly) 03 H6 OBW , (presently) 06 WRX Sportwagon & 2021 Honda CR-V
Joined
·
18,669 Posts
with a used unit, if 05's still have a screen in the turbo oil supply banjo bolt, inspection of that screen is mandatory.

Turbo motors do not have the same HG issues as NA, but of course, the previous owner's treatment of the car and its present condition are the important factors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Less HG danger? That's always nice to hear. Concerning the banjo bolt I will definitely add that to the pre-purchase inspection. Will also stay on top of ATF and coolant, thanks for the tips.

I guess my real question is even if I do everything right, can changing out the turbo and inspecting those issues thoroughly make a big difference in the likelihood of a car with +100k miles blowing its turbo/engine? The alternative is to find one with 50 or 60k, but annoyingly that alone adds $5k to the price, which is pretty much the cost of a new engine.
 

·
Premium Member
(formerly) 03 H6 OBW , (presently) 06 WRX Sportwagon & 2021 Honda CR-V
Joined
·
18,669 Posts
You will find more experience on these issues at NASIOC - but, I'll just say that 'probably' upgrading older vehicles DOES increase the likelihood of creating, problems. There will be more stress on older components. At some point, there could even be 'diminshing returns' leading one to feel, the money woul've been better spent just buying an STI.

Of course, if upgrading the car carries some 'hobbyist'-type value for you, that's a different story. You may not mind the challenges that come with tuning/upgrading. But increasing boost may put more pressure on the intercooler, and maybe you need to push more fuel through, and now you need bigger injectors which requires a higher volume fuel pump.... - things can kinda snowball like that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Oh I'm not interested in trying to gain a whole lot of power. Heck I'm happy to tune an aftermarket to deliver stock performance, I'm just hearing that an aftermarket setup may have a better oil supply and be a little beefier (and therefore able to handle a lower load more reliably).
 

·
Registered
05 Xt beatin' to an inch of its life
Joined
·
665 Posts
Ball bearing center housing rotating assembly turbos require less oil volume and can be more reliable. You'll pay quite a bit more than plethora of Mitsubishi turbos, like the 16g. Which is a great turbo, but smallish for a 2.5L. You'll need tuning with most any change in style of the turbo.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top