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2016 3.6R Outback; tungsten metallic with E/S and every option. I also have a Samsung Note 8 smartphone for trouble-free Bluetooth functionality.
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1,367 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The original Bridgestone tires on ny 3.6 reached their end of safe life at 25k miles. I replaced them with Michelin Premier A/S tires and it's a whole different car. The ride is much smoother and quieter. I have not had enough time yo judge the steering and traction improvements, but I still can't believe the huge difference so far. I will never have another Stone in my tires.

I find it disgusting that my 3.6 came with such sh*tty tires. They were loud, rough and thankfully wore out quickly. Discount Tire did a great job putting the Michelins on in just a few minutes and made the stones disappear.
 

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2018 Dark Blue Outback 3.6R Touring arrived 8/31/2017
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343 Posts
I had water-optimized Continentals on my Legacy, that made them great on wet stuff, which is the majority of the year here, but they had a harsh and very noisy ride, very comparable to what the Bridgestones that came on my 2018 have for noise (though the Bridgestones aren’t harsh, just noisy) on certain road surfaces. I’d be very interested to know how those work for traction in water and snow.
 

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2016 3.6R Outback; tungsten metallic with E/S and every option. I also have a Samsung Note 8 smartphone for trouble-free Bluetooth functionality.
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1,367 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I had water-optimized Continentals on my Legacy, that made them great on wet stuff, which is the majority of the year here, but they had a harsh and very noisy ride, very comparable to what the Bridgestones that came on my 2018 have for noise (though the Bridgestones aren’t harsh, just noisy) on certain road surfaces. I’d be very interested to know how those work for traction in water and snow.

We don't get much snow in south Texas. On the other hand, it's been exemplary on wet roads. Like it's on rails.
 

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2018 Dark Blue Outback 3.6R Touring arrived 8/31/2017
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We don't get much snow in south Texas. On the other hand, it's been exemplary on wet roads. Like it's on rails.
Considering I live in an area famous for being perpetually wet, I will clearly need to keep these tires you mentioned in mind when the time inevitably comes: if I can have tires that ride like they’re on rails in the wet stuff, AND be quiet and ride nicely, that’s a trifecta for me!:grin2:
 

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2015 Legacy 3.6R ES, 2014 Forester Touring ES, 2005 Jeep Liberty Limited
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3,243 Posts
Considering I live in an area famous for being perpetually wet, I will clearly need to keep these tires you mentioned in mind when the time inevitably comes: if I can have tires that ride like they’re on rails in the wet stuff, AND be quiet and ride nicely, that’s a trifecta for me!:grin2:
The newer design of this tire/tyre is the Michelin Premier LTX a softer version with the best ratings for stopping and handling in wet weather. I have a set on my Jeep and the Forester, they are quiet and stopping on dry roads also impressive.

Laughing at Oneself and with Others is Good for the Soul
 

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2016 2.5i Ltd Outback (Tungsten)
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835 Posts
The newer design of this tire/tyre is the Michelin Premier LTX a softer version with the best ratings for stopping and handling in wet weather. I have a set on my Jeep and the Forester, they are quiet and stopping on dry roads also impressive.

Laughing at Oneself and with Others is Good for the Soul
Are you saying that the LTX is a newer version of the A/S? I did not think that was the case, I thought they were alternatives aimed at different (but overlapping) markets (A/S more at highway use and LTX more at SUVs).
 

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2016 3.6 Limited with ES
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2,910 Posts
I have the AS on my car and my Discount Tire guy talked about the differences.

AS is best if you do mostly pavements with some off road or snow trips and and LTX is better if you do much more off road and snow. They overlap but are different.

The sales guy said they sell far more AS than LTX and only stock the AS but the LTX was at the warehouse.

I'm very pleased with the AS.
 

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'14 Subi OBW, '18 Subi Forester
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Consumer Reports rated the Premier A/S near the top for both the H and V speed rated versions in their Nov 2015 issue, and Tirerack also puts it near the top of their 'touring' class tires. But I'm a little bit put off by the shallow initial tread depth of only 8.5/32". As I typically try to scrap my tires when they reach 4/32", this just isn't a whole lot of 'usable' tread life. I'm wondering how this will translate into real world miles.

I'm considering them both for the '14 Outback (H) and '15 Sienna (V), as both kids need new shoes.
 

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2018 Limited
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108 Posts
...........But I'm a little bit put off by the shallow initial tread depth of only 8.5/32". As I typically try to scrap my tires when they reach 4/32", this just isn't a whole lot of 'usable' tread life.......
The whole concept of the Premier series tires (A/S and LTX, both introduced at the same time) is so that the grooves get wider as the tire wear down to maintain relatively constant volume of water channeling capability. The performance at the wear line at 2/32nd is still very good. I don't see the need to change the tire at 4/32nd, other than your own tradition and comfort level. Technically there is no need and is a very good tire at 4/32nd.

I had put Premier LTX on the Odyssey minivan and got 40k mi of great wear and replaced them with the same tire just before I got rid of the car. I also put Premier A/S on my mother's Accord and is wearing just fine. I plan to put the Premier A/S on my OB when replacing the Bridgestone's OE (actually hoping that Michelin will make Pilot AS3+ in 225/60/18....)

The difference between the two, aside from the slight tread pattern is that the crossover/SUV tires (LTX) have stiffer sidewalls than passenger car tire (A/S). Has nothing to do with paved road versus non-paved road or any other seemingly intuitive nonsense sales people say. The stiffer sidewall gives more stability for heavier vehicle but does compromise handling of the tire at time, if placed onto a passenger car (because its lighter and the lower CG location), due to sidewall being too stiff.

The tires are rated for 60k mi but don't expect to get that much out of them.
 

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'14 Subi OBW, '18 Subi Forester
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Understand!

The problem with tire testing is that they typically run brand new tires for 500 miles to deplete the oily surface and then test away. You get great data on full depth tires, but hardly anyone ever shaves them down to see how they respond below 5/32. In my experience tires can work well on dry roads all the way down to the wear bars, but generally suck in the wet much below 4/32 due to the inability to channel water out of the inner groove region. One hydroplaning incident is more expensive than a dozen set of tires, and so my 'practice' is to buy new at 4/32.

The Premier is a different animal. I read the Consumers article some time back, but IIRC, they said it did not perform as well at full tread (new) as the tire line it replaced, but when worn to 5/32 it outperformed it's predecessor and was sufficiently close to it's new tire performance to receive their recommended rating. If it can maintain that level of performance down to 2/32, it could be an excellent investment. If not, then it's rather limiting. I'm leaning towards taking a chance.

Thanks for your comments!
 

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'17 Outback 3.6R Limited, '05 Forester
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My Outback is too new to change tires, however we have been Michelin fans for a while. We live in Central Minnesota so experience ice, snow, rain and heat.

On my wife's Forester, we put the Premier AS because she drives 100% on paved roads but in all weather. The tires are at around 50,000 miles on a 4-tire 6,000 mile rotation. They probably have another year of tread - about 6,000 miles with the amount of driving my wife does. I think they are still good even for one more winter.

On my Durango, I had the LTX. I did go off-road and the lane to our favorite lake (towing a boat) is all dirt, gravel and mud when wet. I did a 5 tire rotation every 6,000 miles on the Durango. The LTX tires lasted just around 73,000 miles ... or just under 60,000 per tire.

On both cars, the Michelin tires were quieter than the OE ones and with significantly better grip. The AS feels smoother on tarmac than the LTX. When we go anywhere as a family, it is always in my car (now the Outback).

Having said that we may consider either the Nokian WRG3 or the Toyo Celsius for my wife's Forester just to give her better grip in our Minnesota winters.
 

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2016 3.6R Outback; tungsten metallic with E/S and every option. I also have a Samsung Note 8 smartphone for trouble-free Bluetooth functionality.
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
After a couple thousand miles with the Michelins, I still can't get over the difference in handling and noise for that matter.


Subaru is doing itself and its customers a huge disfavor by having these BridgeToons on a new Outback, especially the higher end models.
 

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2021 Outback Premium
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13 Posts
I just hit the 50,000 mile mark on my second set of Continentals so they are due for replacement soon. I took a peek in the showroom to see what the new Outbacks were equipped with. They were Yokohama Geolander A/T-S tires. Anyone have any experience with these? The Michelin A/T-S are the same price. I'm not unhappy with the Continentals but I am willing to try something which is quiet for everyday use but performs well in rain and snow.
 

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2016 3.6R Outback; tungsten metallic with E/S and every option. I also have a Samsung Note 8 smartphone for trouble-free Bluetooth functionality.
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I had Geolanders on my Tahoe, just before I got my 3.6. I had Michelins before the Yoko and wished I had bought Michelins instead of the Yokos. The Geolanders were fine, they only problem is that they were not Michelins. The Michelins were smoother and held the road a little better. I'm sure the Geolanders are far better than the Bridgestones but they are not Michelins.
 

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2016 Outback 3.6R
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Replaced my OEM Bridgestones yesterday with some Michelin Premier A/S. The Bridgestones had 15K miles on them and Discount tire gave me $30 per tire trade towards the new Michelin's.

Pretty happy with the upgrade! :29:
 

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Outback 2018 2.5i Premium
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My new 2018 Outback Premium has the stock Bridgestone Dueler H/P Sport AS (225/65r17). I am looking for the best ride I can get with this vehicle. Having read all the tire reports here it appears that there are much better choices for tires. I am partial to the Michelin's and want to maintain the stock tire size. Now I find my choices limited (as of 11-3-17):

Not available in size 225/65r17:
Michelin Premier A/S___Grand Touring All-Season
Michelin Defender_____ Standard Touring All-Season

Available:
Michelin Defender T+H 102H___ Standard Touring A/S, wear 820, 10/32"
Michelin Premier LTX___Crossover/SUV Touring A/S light truck tire, wear 620, 8.5/32"

Anyone have any experience with these two tires on an Outback? I suspect that a 3600# Outback doesn't really need the stiffer wall of the LTX (light truck) but then again that's what the Dueler is and the ride is not really bad. I would think the Michelin would give a better ride/handling ??
 
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'13 2.5 Premium
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Last Nov I put Defenders on my '13. Then we had one of the driest, mildest winters in years. Maybe this year I'll find out how good they are in the slop.
 

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After a couple thousand miles with the Michelins, I still can't get over the difference in handling and noise for that matter.


Subaru is doing itself and its customers a huge disfavor by having these BridgeToons on a new Outback, especially the higher end models.
I agree that most any Michelins seem to perform better in many respects than the Duelers.
 

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2016 Outback 3.6R
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46 Posts
My new 2018 Outback Premium has the stock Bridgestone Dueler H/P Sport AS (225/65r17). I am looking for the best ride I can get with this vehicle. Having read all the tire reports here it appears that there are much better choices for tires. I am partial to the Michelin's and want to maintain the stock tire size. Now I find my choices limited (as of 11-3-17):

Not available in size 225/65r17:
Michelin Premier A/S___Grand Touring All-Season
Michelin Defender_____ Standard Touring All-Season

Available:
Michelin Defender T+H 102H___ Standard Touring A/S, wear 820, 10/32"
Michelin Premier LTX___Crossover/SUV Touring A/S light truck tire, wear 620, 8.5/32"

Anyone have any experience with these two tires on an Outback? I suspect that a 3600# Outback doesn't really need the stiffer wall of the LTX (light truck) but then again that's what the Dueler is and the ride is not really bad. I would think the Michelin would give a better ride/handling ??
I have no personal experience with LTX on a Subaru but if those were my Michelin choices I would go with the Premier LTX over the Standard Touring A/S.

The Premier LTX features Expanding Rain Grooves and Emerging Grooves first introduced on the Premier A/S passenger car tire line. The benefit of these two features is the lessened drop off of wet traction as the tire wears when compared to the competition. This feature is what sets the tire apart from the Defender LTX

I think that's the same difference between the Premier LTX and the Standard Touring A/S (Defender).
 
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