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2006 OB 2.5i Limited
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23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm rebuilding my SOHC 2.5i '06 outback with new HG, timing, seal... the works. I'm a little confused with the positioning of the cam seals. I've talked to the parts guy at Subaru and he tells me that just to keep the cam seals flush with cylinder head which is what i did in the picture below with the bolt in the cam. The other picture without the bolt is the original position when i took off the motor. Its more sunk in a bit.

Can someone help clarify which is the correct position? I just don't the seal to leak or restrict oil flow if I push it too far in, thanks.
 

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2000 Outback Limited, Dual Range 5 Speed
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906 Posts
When I did mine, parts guy said make them flush with the back edge of the shampher on the od of the head, so about 2mm in from the front flat flange.
 

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2001 VDC Wagon - White pearl - 302,000 km
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466 Posts
First of all, don't ask a parts guy for advise on technicalities of your engine. Ask to talk to a service technician. If you bought the seals from Subaru, they should at least extend that courtesy to you. If not, find another dealer.

I agree though, the first photo is showing the seal too far in. Think of it this way....if you install the new seal in the exact position the old one was in, you risk the seal riding in the same groove the old seal rode in, which is not ideal. The surface of the cam and the bore of the head where the OD of the seal mate are concentric, parallel and cylindrical, meaning that the seal will do it's job over a range of installed depths within the bore of the head. If the old seal was jammed all the way in, then you should install it a mm or two toward the flush surface of the head, but not beyond the chamfer, where it meets the seal bore. This way, the new cam seal will be riding on an unused, 'factory size' surface.
I like to use a very thin film of Permatex aviation form-a-gasket on the OD of the seal. It cures firm, yet pliable.

A great deal of aftermarket seals are generally known to have pre-engineered offsets in them. Basically, they build a factory seal, but they change the position of the seal to shaft contact interface. Factory seals generally do not.
 

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2006 OB 2.5i Limited
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23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys, this really helped summed things up & it seems like my position; flush with the cylinder head should be sufficient. I might go in a mm more in towards the head but wished I would of added some Permatex prior. Now I just gotta find a way to evenly push the seal in a mm or so.
 

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2008 Outback 2.5
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985 Posts
You could use an old seal to push the new one in by gently tapping the perimeter down. Remember, you can tap more, but you can't tap less.
 

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Registered
2006 OB 2.5i Limited
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23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You could use an old seal to push the new one in by gently tapping the perimeter down. Remember, you can tap more, but you can't tap less.
Yea this is my 2nd cam seal :grin2: I went too far and angled the first time but ill be gentle with her this time.
 
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