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Hello!

I just purchased a 2018 Flagstaff e-pro and am considering using my 2020 outback limited 2.5i as a towing vehicle for it. Before i invest in getting a hitch set up, I'd like to get some feedback from you all.

The trailer's details are as follows, more info can be found using the below link:

2018 Flagstaff by Forest River E-Pro Series E14FK Prices


Base Weight (lbs / kg)
2022 / 917.2
Carrying Capacity (lbs / kg)
895 / 406
Hitch Weight (lbs / kg)
277 / 125.6


I know I'm cutting it close with the vehicles towing capacity at 2700lbs, I would definitely be traveling without liquids and with a majority of the cargo in the outback rather than the trailer. if I was to tow the trailer with the outback it would mainly be from San Diego to Mammoth, a 6.5 hour drive with minimal steep grades. I have no problem driving slow and taking my time. My fear is that I may cause some damage to the engine or that my gas mileage may be god awful...

The trailer does have electric breaks so I will make sure that the outback is set up to utilize them, i also think I may get some sway control bars?

Lastly, this is a hypothetical, but would the XT model of the outback (2020/21) be able to tow this with ease?

thanks for your feedback!
 

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Hi,

I think you've made your homework. As a rule of thumb 10% of the trailer weight is putted to the hitch, and added to the payload of the car. So it's to your advantage to put cargo in the trailer instead inside of the car, because only 10% of that weight will be added to your Outback. Other important thing to know, always put the load in the front of the trailer. This Uhaul video will explain the law of physic better than me:

Have fun


Hello!

I just purchased a 2018 Flagstaff e-pro and am considering using my 2020 outback limited 2.5i as a towing vehicle for it. Before i invest in getting a hitch set up, I'd like to get some feedback from you all.

The trailer's details are as follows, more info can be found using the below link:

2018 Flagstaff by Forest River E-Pro Series E14FK Prices


Base Weight (lbs / kg)
2022 / 917.2
Carrying Capacity (lbs / kg)
895 / 406
Hitch Weight (lbs / kg)
277 / 125.6


I know I'm cutting it close with the vehicles towing capacity at 2700lbs, I would definitely be traveling without liquids and with a majority of the cargo in the outback rather than the trailer. if I was to tow the trailer with the outback it would mainly be from San Diego to Mammoth, a 6.5 hour drive with minimal steep grades. I have no problem driving slow and taking my time. My fear is that I may cause some damage to the engine or that my gas mileage may be god awful...

The trailer does have electric breaks so I will make sure that the outback is set up to utilize them, i also think I may get some sway control bars?

Lastly, this is a hypothetical, but would the XT model of the outback (2020/21) be able to tow this with ease?

thanks for your feedback!
 

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2020 Limited XT
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58 Posts
Personally, I wouldn’t. With 2000 lbs already in dry weight—assuming that dry weight is even accurate, which it very rarely is; in reality, trailers usually weigh in higher than spec--you’re likely to be running very close to your overall capacity. Additionally, if hitch weight is already 277 with absolutely nothing on it, it’s likely to be well over 300 and possibly over 350 once loaded properly. Any tongue weight must be subtracted from the vehicle’s payload of 900 pounds (including passengers), plus cargo adds even more weight to the rear axle, so putting stuff in the car instead of the trailer isn‘t necessarily a good solution.

And sway control bars are a no-no on most unibody vehicles, including Subaru.

I’m not particularly fond of the XT versus my previous 3.6r, but I bought it to tow a trailer with a verified dry weight that’s almost 200 pounds less than yours, one that I personally have weighed the tongue on so I know exactly what I’m putting on the hitch (and I will continue to do so regularly). The higher torque and extra horsepower make it better suited to towing than the 2.5, and the higher towing weight limits mean I can stay below them without a lot of extra work.
 

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I was looking at converting a 6x10 enclosed cargo trailer

The dry weight is 1080. Aluminum frame.

Bed, lights, basic power system and a simple kitchen should keep the weight under 2000

However.... I just look at it and think I can't tow that without a truck...... ;)
 
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