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I applied Meguiar's Hybrid Ceramic Wax on my new Outback without any prep other than a hand wash. It was easy! Just spray on and wipe off. So easy that I applied a second coat at the next wash.
The finish is super slick and water, bird droppings and insects just roll off.
The 26 oz bottle costs $13. I can't see why anyone would spent hundreds of dollars for a "professional" application.
My wife's Forester was a little older when I applied the Meguire's. The finish was a little gritty, so I am planning to give it the clay bar treatment and re-apply the Meguire's.
I used Meguiar's Hybrid Ceramic Wax And a couple of other Meguiars products my old Outback and our 2012 minivan. I agree it's a great wax alternative. Super easy to apply and works great for about a month. The reason people spend more to have a professional put the expensive stuff on is because it'll be flawless and last year's instead of months. While they both have "ceramic" in the name, the pro stuff is just in a different category.
 

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‘20 Outback Limited, ‘20 Legacy Limited
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Well, I did my 2020 in May? June? One of those, with TW , stopped the wiping down with Wet Wax late Nov when temps dropped, and haven’t washed since December. I’ll update with pics when the weather gets nice. My application was the first of anything on this vehicle, so with the abuse it’s going thru now, maybe a bit more info about this stuff later? Could be the pro application is best, but I doubt it.

I like the TW, but suspect all the others are pretty similar.
 

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2020 Limted XT Black/Ivory
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I’ll be able to provide a firsthand comparison between TW hybrid ceramic and carpro cquartz applied professionally. My outback has the carpro and I did my company car with the turtle was just for giggles. I’ll see how they both hold up come spring.
 

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2020 Onyx
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There's a combination of factors at work here.

A pro ceramic treatment includes extensive cleansing of the surface, usually to include fine polishing, wiping all residue off with isopropyl alcohol, so that you have an immaculate surface to apply the coating. The coating then sticks well to the paint.

At home if you wash your car like usual and take the same pro ceramic formula and wipe your car down with it, you won't get the same results. Your results might not be much better than just using the new consumer-grade ceramic sprays for several reasons. Your paint was never fully decontaminated so whether it's minor oxidation, road film (which often doesn't come off with a gentle car shampoo) or even car shampoo residue. How many of us wipe our cars down with alcohol after a wash? I never have.

Most car shampoos are designed not to strip off wax, so they are ultra gentle. If your car had some prior stuff on it, whether it's carnauba, silicone, or whatever the dealer applied, it's still on the paint. Then whatever you apply afterwards is layering on the carnauba or whatever was there and the coating will only be as good as its weakest link.

When I first got my car from the dealer and I applied the turtle wax hybrid ceramic it didn't last very long but that's because I just applied it over the dealer's whatever it was. Once I cleaned the surface well the turtle wax hybrid ceramic was very long lasting.

If you're going to spend the time and energy to do that much prep then it makes sense to try using the expensive stuff but if you're going to be like me and not want to go crazy prepping then these spray waxes are amazing. When it comes to the cost of the product and the results you get with little effort, I think it's a sensible choice.

Even if you get a pro ceramic you still need to maintain it and put toppers. Read the fine print if you had a professionally applied ceramic, what it takes to get the warranty coverage. It's like a car that has a 100,000 mile warranty - you still need to maintain it to keep the warranty intact.

And again these silicon dioxide coatings are NOT true ceramic in the sense that it gives your car hard enamel/ceramic protection. It's a SOFT coating. The 9H is PENCIL hardness scale, not 9H MOHS scale like actual glass. Don't be fooled. Your paint will still get scratched from a dirty wash mitt or anything else that would scratch waxed paint.

Also consider who you pay to do the ceramic coating. If a guy has only been around for 2 years do you think he'll be around for the duration of your 5 year warranty? Maybe, maybe not. A shop with decades of experience will be $$ but at least they'll be around if you have a legitimate claim.
 

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For the DIY stuff, this video is informative. Project Farm, better testing than anybody... plus random use of the Farmabago! (Not in this video however.)

 

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When I bought my (black) 2019 Outback I researched several DIY Ceramic Coat products and found Armor Shield IX. Their customer and professional detailers reviews and many "how to" videos sold me.

It will be 2 years in May since I Armor Shield coated my Outback and it still looks great! The car looks new after washing it and in winter the salt spray and mud come off at the spray carwash with ease.

I am very anal about taking care of my vehicles (I even wash and wax my lawn tractor and snow blower) and am very pleased with the results from the Armor Shield IX. When the time comes, I will use their product again.

I have no affiliation with the company other than being a satisfied customer. This photo is 17 months after coating my Outback with Armor Shield IX
504339
Here is a link to their website.
 

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2020 Onyx
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Pan the Organizer did two videos - application as well as a 3-month update. Also a discount code (don't know if it's expired).


 

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I applied Meguiar's Hybrid Ceramic Wax on my new Outback without any prep other than a hand wash. It was easy! Just spray on and wipe off. So easy that I applied a second coat at the next wash.
The finish is super slick and water, bird droppings and insects just roll off.
The 26 oz bottle costs $13. I can't see why anyone would spent hundreds of dollars for a "professional" application.
My wife's Forester was a little older when I applied the Meguire's. The finish was a little gritty, so I am planning to give it the clay bar treatment and re-apply the Meguire's.
One tip I noticed regarding the condition or your finish is to put your hand in a plastic sandwich baggie and run it over your car's finish. If you can feel "bumps" it's time to clay bar and apply some new sealant. I did this to my one year outback that I had clay bared when new and am feeling that the surface is not smooth. It may feel smooth to the bare hand but the baggie makes the contaminates felt. I am using Technicians Choice as my ceramic coating.
 

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When I bought my (black) 2019 Outback I researched several DIY Ceramic Coat products and found Armor Shield IX. Their customer and professional detailers reviews and many "how to" videos sold me.

It will be 2 years in May since I Armor Shield coated my Outback and it still looks great! The car looks new after washing it and in winter the salt spray and mud come off at the spray carwash with ease.

I am very anal about taking care of my vehicles (I even wash and wax my lawn tractor and snow blower) and am very pleased with the results from the Armor Shield IX. When the time comes, I will use their product again.

I have no affiliation with the company other than being a satisfied customer. This photo is 17 months after coating my Outback with Armor Shield IX View attachment 504339 Here is a link to their website.
Thanks for sharing!
I've been leaning towards Avalon King Armour Shield after seeing on the Vinwiki channel. Im planning to use it this spring once the weather warms up.

@godfather53 what surface prep did you do prior to application, and what have you done since? Have you applied anything over the Armour Shield?

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Thanks for sharing!
I've been leaning towards Avalon King Armour Shield after seeing on the Vinwiki channel. Im planning to use it this spring once the weather warms up.

@godfather53 what surface prep did you do prior to application, and what have you done since? Have you applied anything over the Armour Shield?

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Just as a side note on surface preparation, if you put your hand in a sandwich baggie and run it over the surface of the car you will every contaminant on the surface of the paint. The bare hand won't pick them up. A clay bar of the surface would be in order. My outback is stored in a garage. The surface was clean a year ago when I bought it and now I will need to clay bar it again when the weather gets a little better since I can feel the contaminants.
 

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For the DIY stuff, this video is informative. Project Farm, better testing than anybody... plus random use of the Farmabago! (Not in this video however.)

I watched that video and bought the Turtle Wax Hybrid because of that video. TW does exactly everything it says it's supposed to do and makes application pretty much idiot proof. You can spray it on anything. Paint, chrome, plastic, plastic (and lamps), the black bumpers, roof rails, rims, tyres. It will leave a slightly oily look after application. Wait overnight (per instructions), and buff with a damp towel. Can be sprayed in direct sunlight. Surprisingly, it didn't gum up the wiper blades after I tried a sample area on the windshield. I wash, clay, and apply in the spring and start of fall. Water still beads up. Worth every penny at $15. The instructions mean it when they say two sprays a panel. My first application, I went for the more-is-more theory, and had to spend some extra time wet buffing off the excess. One bottle should get you 3-4 applications.

The first year of ownership, I did the New Finish. It's good stuff and it's cheap. It can be applied in direct sun, and it buffs off easily. It lasts. The only downfall is if you even "point" an unopended bottle at a piece of rubber trim, it will turn to "permanent chalk stain". It will murder rubber, and is hard to get off. For double the price, the TW does the same stuff, but so much easier. No staining.
 

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I’m admittedly an amateur, but decided to give 3 different ceramic coatings a go, one right after the other. I decided not to wash or clay bar the Touring XT, as it’s just over a week old. I’m not sure, but I think I may have used too much product.



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This is 100% normal. NE Ohio here. Car is parked outside all year. It's just the way the water beads freeze, and more form, and freeze...and so on. Pop your wipers up when you park. Less ice to clean off.
 

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With temperatures finally above freezing this week, I’m going to try to hit the rock chips on the hood with the touch up paint applied via toothpick, and then later that day, use the 303 Graphene. Fingers crossed!
 

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This is 100% normal. NE Ohio here. Car is parked outside all year. It's just the way the water beads freeze, and more form, and freeze...and so on. Pop your wipers up when you park. Less ice to clean off.
It happens on occasion here, but knew I wasn’t driving anywhere in the ice, so didn’t sweat it. Plus, with the wiper heater, I never worry about popping them up.


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With temperatures finally above freezing this week, I’m going to try to hit the rock chips on the hood with the touch up paint applied via toothpick, and then later that day, use the 303 Graphene. Fingers crossed!
Looking forward to your results.


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I'm old school, Meguiars Cleaner Wax every two months. Takes less than an hour to do the whole car. My theory is a glass smooth surface is more resistant to chips, so far working out pretty well.
 

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I used Meguiar's Hybrid Ceramic Wax And a couple of other Meguiars products my old Outback and our 2012 minivan. I agree it's a great wax alternative. Super easy to apply and works great for about a month. The reason people spend more to have a professional put the expensive stuff on is because it'll be flawless and last year's instead of months. While they both have "ceramic" in the name, the pro stuff is just in a different category.
While this is true, re-applying the spray on products is trivial. For the Maguire's you just spray on the product then rinse with water to activate it. I don't see why doing that every two or three months would be such a big deal.
I watched that video and bought the Turtle Wax Hybrid because of that video. TW does exactly everything it says it's supposed to do and makes application pretty much idiot proof. You can spray it on anything. Paint, chrome, plastic, plastic (and lamps), the black bumpers, roof rails, rims, tyres. It will leave a slightly oily look after application. Wait overnight (per instructions), and buff with a damp towel. Can be sprayed in direct sunlight. Surprisingly, it didn't gum up the wiper blades after I tried a sample area on the windshield. I wash, clay, and apply in the spring and start of fall. Water still beads up. Worth every penny at $15. The instructions mean it when they say two sprays a panel. My first application, I went for the more-is-more theory, and had to spend some extra time wet buffing off the excess. One bottle should get you 3-4 applications.

The first year of ownership, I did the New Finish. It's good stuff and it's cheap. It can be applied in direct sun, and it buffs off easily. It lasts. The only downfall is if you even "point" an unopended bottle at a piece of rubber trim, it will turn to "permanent chalk stain". It will murder rubber, and is hard to get off. For double the price, the TW does the same stuff, but so much easier. No staining.
I'm glad you mentioned plastic. With the amount of black cladding the Outback has, I'm concerned with protecting that and giving it UV protection. I'm sure we've all seen some older Chevy Avalanche by now where the owner did nothing to protect the plastic on those vehicles, and it all faded from deep black to a light grey. Really don't want that happening with my Outback and Forester. Are there any other products you guys are using to give the plastic trim pieces UV protection?
 

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While this is true, re-applying the spray on products is trivial. For the Maguire's you just spray on the product then rinse with water to activate it. I don't see why doing that every two or three months would be such a big deal.

I'm glad you mentioned plastic. With the amount of black cladding the Outback has, I'm concerned with protecting that and giving it UV protection. I'm sure we've all seen some older Chevy Avalanche by now where the owner did nothing to protect the plastic on those vehicles, and it all faded from deep black to a light grey. Really don't want that happening with my Outback and Forester. Are there any other products you guys are using to give the plastic trim pieces UV protection?
Wolfgang Exterior Trim sealant is your friend...





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Project Farm did some UV testing of trim products - very rare for anyone to actually test UV filtering.

 

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While this is true, re-applying the spray on products is trivial. For the Maguire's you just spray on the product then rinse with water to activate it. I don't see why doing that every two or three months would be such a big deal.
It's not a big deal. That's why I use the cheap Maguire's stuff on my 2012 minivan. Simple, easy to slap on, looks reasonably good for a month or two. Absolutely nothing wrong with that at all. I've done it for many years with their products as they've developed from NXT onward.

Same goes with having a professional use high grade products for a flawless treatment that lasts years. Certainly costs more, but for the owner that wants the best, the best is the way to go. My only suggestion is as a rule of thumb is that if you want to get the pro job done, go to a reputable detailer and avoid the dealership stuff.

Other than that it's all good, there's no right or wrong to it.
 
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