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2012 2.5i Premium
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Discussion Starter #1
I just bought a new bike since I moved, but the thule bike tray I had didn't fit on the stock crossbars. Obviously I had no intention of purchasing a new tray/rack as that would cut into my bike budget. I found a pair of used thule crossbars for sale on craigslist, $30 for the pair. With some teardown of the stock crossbars I realized I could attach the thule crossbars and still use the stock mounting hardware. I can writeup a quick how to if anyone is interested. Basically it just involved measuring, drilling and re-attaching. All together I spent $60 for the bars, nuts, bolts and washers. It isn't pretty, but it does the job. Only took about 4 hours of work to complete once I had all the pieces. Hoping to find someway to add to the cosmetic aspect, but for now it works and feels solid.



 

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2011 3.6R Limited in Azurite Blue
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56 Posts
Great idea. One thing you could do for aesthetics is flip the bolts or use a carriage bolt so it has a smooth surface on the top instead of the nut/bolt sticking up. That way, the part that is longer is facing the roof instead of the air. If that makes sense haha
 

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2011 3.6R Limited in Azurite Blue
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Also, what is your distance between the bars now? Sorry, I've never measured the stock distance...
 

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I just bought a new bike since I moved, but the thule bike tray I had didn't fit on the stock crossbars. Obviously I had no intention of purchasing a new tray/rack as that would cut into my bike budget. I found a pair of used thule crossbars for sale on craigslist, $30 for the pair. With some teardown of the stock crossbars I realized I could attach the thule crossbars and still use the stock mounting hardware. I can writeup a quick how to if anyone is interested. Basically it just involved measuring, drilling and re-attaching. All together I spent $60 for the bars, nuts, bolts and washers. It isn't pretty, but it does the job. Only took about 4 hours of work to complete once I had all the pieces. Hoping to find someway to add to the cosmetic aspect, but for now it works and feels solid.



I have a bunch of Yakima rack gear and have no intention of replacing it. I simply use my railgrab feet to grab the stock bars in stowed position and mount my standard Yakima gear. Been doing it since 2010 hauling bikes, roof bin, 12ft long 135lb 55inch wide sailboat on 66inch bars etc. Zero issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Great idea. One thing you could do for aesthetics is flip the bolts or use a carriage bolt so it has a smooth surface on the top instead of the nut/bolt sticking up. That way, the part that is longer is facing the roof instead of the air. If that makes sense haha
That does make sense. That would take a little work so I'll probably just leave it how it is for now. The distance the bars are apart is 28.5 inches and 3 inches off the roof. I know the yakima control towers rais the bars 8 inches off the roof.

Like I said before, its not visually appealing, but it does work.
 

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2013 Outback 2.5i CVT Limited, Nav+EyeSight
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228 Posts
Great idea. One thing you could do for aesthetics is flip the bolts or use a carriage bolt so it has a smooth surface on the top instead of the nut/bolt sticking up. That way, the part that is longer is facing the roof instead of the air. If that makes sense haha
I've put a LOT of thought into some of these methods myself (ended up just putting a basket on the roof and calling it a day).

If you go with carriage bolts, you'll need to cut square holes in the thule bars for the carriage head. Much harder to drill a square hole than a round one!
 

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2011 3.6R Limited in Azurite Blue
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I've put a LOT of thought into some of these methods myself (ended up just putting a basket on the roof and calling it a day).

If you go with carriage bolts, you'll need to cut square holes in the thule bars for the carriage head. Much harder to drill a square hole than a round one!
I really want a basket too but with a 8 month old at the house, it'll have to wait for a little bit. I reused my Thule cross bars from my Jeep and the work ok now. It's only a 24.5 inch spacing but that'll do for now. On the carriage bolt thing, I've used washers that will fit around the square part with locking nuts on the other side. Seems to work pretty well.

OP, bike looks like it fits great!
 

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2013 Outback, 2.5i Limited w/ Moonroof
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incorrect ... a square hole is easily drilled ...

Square Hole Drill-bit - YouTube
While the video shows a pretty cool technology, Se7enLC is still correct. It is much, much, much easier to drill a round hole. If it were as easy to drill a square hole as a round hole, each of us would have that capability in our shop, right along side our set of standard drill bits, and you would not be showing this video, as the technology would be common, to the point of being mundane. There must be thousands, perhaps even tens of thousands, of standard drill bits for every one that is capable of boring a square hole.
 
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