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would you take it to 100k?
I think I made the answer to that clear in my post.

EDIT: I should add that I had an involuntary (but free!) fluid change around 70k miles when the dealer had to pull the CVT to replace a pump seal. My local indy shop is recommending a 60-90k interval.
 

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The elephant in the room is Subaru's official maintenance schedule that recommends changing the CVT fluid at 24,855 miles when the vehicle is frequently operated under severe driving conditions, with "repeated trailer towing" provided as an example applicable to the CVT fluid.

Otherwise, they recommend never touching it as long as the transmission is functioning properly. If the transmission fails, they would rather have it sent to Japan untouched and replace it with a new or factory remanufactured transmission.

Best case scenario, the fluid lasts 300,000+ miles. Worst case scenario, 24,855 miles. Unlike motor oil, CVT fluid isn't subjected to combustion by-products - water, exhaust gasses, carbon particulates, dirt (from intake air), but moving parts do wear and leave wear particles. Fluids also degrade from pressure, shear, and heat.

It used to be that Subaru recommended inspecting the CVT fluid at 36, 66, 96, 126k miles, but now instead of inspecting the CVT fluid, they just examine the exterior of the transmission for signs of leakage.

Some years of CVT have a 10 years/100k mile extended warranty - but not every year. Even if my CVT is functioning normally, one month before my CVT warranty expires, I plan to pay out of pocket to have the dealer change my CVT fluid and send in a sample for analysis. That way if there's something alarming about the results, it can potentially be covered under warranty, or if for some reason the fluid change screws up the transmission, we have a month to find out.

Some food for thought in this thread: https://www.subaruforester.org/threads/should-i-have-xt-cvt-fluid-changed-by-dealer-or-not.461425/post-5789130\

To those who haven't done it in their SJ FXT, per @GeoJosh's tip, recommend that you ask (demand!) to see the CVT fluid they'll be using to do the change before they even drain it, or touch the car actually.. it's a great tip for any work that needs to be done on your car actually.

So I asked and they showed me blue 1qt CVT fluid for the N/A SJ Forester - sorry, but that's not the right stuff for my car I told the service guy. Then he questioned how I knew it was incorrect and who did I hear from that it needed a different CVT fluid - so I told him look in the owner's manual.. to which he went back to his computer to verify and came back a few minutes later to tell me I was right and that I needed the orange CVT-High Torque fluid out of the 5 quart bucket. You think?! So verify before you do it because there's no dipstick to verify! Unless you want to get under the car.
 

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The elephant in the room is Subaru's official maintenance schedule that recommends changing the CVT fluid at 24,855 miles when the vehicle is frequently operated under severe driving conditions, with "repeated trailer towing" provided as an example applicable to the CVT fluid.
The way I read the Schedule of Inspection and Maintenance Services document that came with my 2015 Outback is that "repeated trailer towing" is the only severe driving condition applicable to CVT fluid replacement.

MAINTENANCE ITEM
...
13 CVT fluid (except BRZ) <inspect at 30,000 mile intervals> Note 4
...

Notes:
...

4. When the vehicle is frequently operated under severe driving conditions**,
(If applicable) CVT fluid replacement should be performed every 24,855
miles (40,000 km).
...

**Examples of Severe Driving Conditions:
a. Repeated short distance driving. (Maintenance Items 1 and 2 only)
b. Driving on rough and/or muddy roads. (Maintenance Items 15 and 16)
c. Driving in dusty conditions. (Maintenance Item 8 only)
d. Driving in extremely cold weather. (Maintenance Items 1, 2, 17, and 18)
e. Driving in areas where road salts or other corrosive materials are used.
(Maintenance Items 6, 15, 16, and 17)
f. Living in coastal areas. (Maintenance Item 6)
g. Repeated trailer towing.
(Maintenance Items 1, 2, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18)
I note that "excessive stop-and-go driving" is not listed as a Severe Driving Condition, but if it were considered so, why isn't it included in the list? That would seem to be no less common than frequent trailer towing.

Otherwise, they recommend never touching it as long as the transmission is functioning properly. If the transmission fails, they would rather have it sent to Japan untouched and replace it with a new or factory remanufactured transmission.

Best case scenario, the fluid lasts 300,000+ miles. Worst case scenario, 24,855 miles. Unlike motor oil, CVT fluid isn't subjected to combustion by-products - water, exhaust gasses, carbon particulates, dirt (from intake air), but moving parts do wear and leave wear particles. Fluids also degrade from pressure, shear, and heat.

It used to be that Subaru recommended inspecting the CVT fluid at 36, 66, 96, 126k miles, but now instead of inspecting the CVT fluid, they just examine the exterior of the transmission for signs of leakage.

Some years of CVT have a 10 years/100k mile extended warranty - but not every year. Even if my CVT is functioning normally, one month before my CVT warranty expires, I plan to pay out of pocket to have the dealer change my CVT fluid and send in a sample for analysis. That way if there's something alarming about the results, it can potentially be covered under warranty, or if for some reason the fluid change screws up the transmission, we have a month to find out.

Some food for thought in this thread: https://www.subaruforester.org/threads/should-i-have-xt-cvt-fluid-changed-by-dealer-or-not.461425/post-5789130\

To those who haven't done it in their SJ FXT, per @GeoJosh's tip, recommend that you ask (demand!) to see the CVT fluid they'll be using to do the change before they even drain it, or touch the car actually.. it's a great tip for any work that needs to be done on your car actually.

So I asked and they showed me blue 1qt CVT fluid for the N/A SJ Forester - sorry, but that's not the right stuff for my car I told the service guy. Then he questioned how I knew it was incorrect and who did I hear from that it needed a different CVT fluid - so I told him look in the owner's manual.. to which he went back to his computer to verify and came back a few minutes later to tell me I was right and that I needed the orange CVT-High Torque fluid out of the 5 quart bucket. You think?! So verify before you do it because there's no dipstick to verify! Unless you want to get under the car.
That anecdote sounds like exactly the sort of reason why routine CVT fluid changes are discouraged. I know my dealer's service department was really, really(!) against doing it for me, and this was after showing them a recommendation, in writing, from the previous servicing dealer (I was on a trip) that I have it done at the next service. It did not seem prudent to force them into performing a service they say I don't need and they don't want to do. I have paperwork showing both the recommendation at 54,000 miles and the request, and denial that it was necessary, at 60,000 miles; that documentation might help in case things go bad.
 

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The elephant in the room is Subaru's official maintenance schedule that recommends changing the CVT fluid at 24,855 miles when the vehicle is frequently operated under severe driving conditions, with "repeated trailer towing" provided as an example applicable to the CVT fluid.
The way I read the Schedule of Inspection and Maintenance Services document that came with my 2015 Outback is that "repeated trailer towing" is the only severe driving condition applicable to CVT fluid replacement.

MAINTENANCE ITEM
...
13 CVT fluid (except BRZ) <inspect at 30,000 mile intervals> Note 4
...

Notes:
...

4. When the vehicle is frequently operated under severe driving conditions**,
(If applicable) CVT fluid replacement should be performed every 24,855
miles (40,000 km).
...

**Examples of Severe Driving Conditions:
a. Repeated short distance driving. (Maintenance Items 1 and 2 only)
b. Driving on rough and/or muddy roads. (Maintenance Items 15 and 16)
c. Driving in dusty conditions. (Maintenance Item 8 only)
d. Driving in extremely cold weather. (Maintenance Items 1, 2, 17, and 18)
e. Driving in areas where road salts or other corrosive materials are used.
(Maintenance Items 6, 15, 16, and 17)
f. Living in coastal areas. (Maintenance Item 6)
g. Repeated trailer towing.
(Maintenance Items 1, 2, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18)
I note that "excessive stop-and-go driving" is not listed as a Severe Driving Condition, but if it were considered so, why isn't it included in the list? That would seem to be no less common than frequent trailer towing.

Otherwise, they recommend never touching it as long as the transmission is functioning properly. If the transmission fails, they would rather have it sent to Japan untouched and replace it with a new or factory remanufactured transmission.

Best case scenario, the fluid lasts 300,000+ miles. Worst case scenario, 24,855 miles. Unlike motor oil, CVT fluid isn't subjected to combustion by-products - water, exhaust gasses, carbon particulates, dirt (from intake air), but moving parts do wear and leave wear particles. Fluids also degrade from pressure, shear, and heat.

It used to be that Subaru recommended inspecting the CVT fluid at 36, 66, 96, 126k miles, but now instead of inspecting the CVT fluid, they just examine the exterior of the transmission for signs of leakage.

Some years of CVT have a 10 years/100k mile extended warranty - but not every year. Even if my CVT is functioning normally, one month before my CVT warranty expires, I plan to pay out of pocket to have the dealer change my CVT fluid and send in a sample for analysis. That way if there's something alarming about the results, it can potentially be covered under warranty, or if for some reason the fluid change screws up the transmission, we have a month to find out.

Some food for thought in this thread: https://www.subaruforester.org/threads/should-i-have-xt-cvt-fluid-changed-by-dealer-or-not.461425/post-5789130\

To those who haven't done it in their SJ FXT, per @GeoJosh's tip, recommend that you ask (demand!) to see the CVT fluid they'll be using to do the change before they even drain it, or touch the car actually.. it's a great tip for any work that needs to be done on your car actually.

So I asked and they showed me blue 1qt CVT fluid for the N/A SJ Forester - sorry, but that's not the right stuff for my car I told the service guy. Then he questioned how I knew it was incorrect and who did I hear from that it needed a different CVT fluid - so I told him look in the owner's manual.. to which he went back to his computer to verify and came back a few minutes later to tell me I was right and that I needed the orange CVT-High Torque fluid out of the 5 quart bucket. You think?! So verify before you do it because there's no dipstick to verify! Unless you want to get under the car.
That anecdote sounds like exactly the reason why routine CVT fluid changes are discouraged. I know my dealer's service department was really, really(!) against doing it for me, and this was after a recommendation from the previous servicing dealer (I was on a trip) recommended that I have it done at the next service, and I showed the recommendation, in writing, to my dealer's service writer. It did not seem prudent to force them into performing a service they say I don't need and they don't want to do. I have paperwork showing both the recommendation at 54,000 miles and the request, and denial that it was necessary, at 60,000 miles; that documentation might help in case things go bad.
 

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The way I read the Schedule of Inspection and Maintenance Services document that came with my 2015 Outback is that "repeated trailer towing" is the only severe driving condition applicable to CVT fluid replacement.
That is also specifically noted in a subaru techinfo newsletter as well.
 

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The way I read the Schedule of Inspection and Maintenance Services document that came with my 2015 Outback is that "repeated trailer towing" is the only severe driving condition applicable to CVT fluid replacement.
Repeated Trailer Towing was the only EXAMPLE that they provided that was applicable to CVT fluid replacement. In this case, severe refers to Load x Frequency. The key word is example. It's not as if the use of an empty trailer "frequently" would qualify as severe service just because it was on a hitch. Similarly, a heavy load on the car without a trailer, going up hill, can be a lot of load on the transmission, hitch or not.

The other consideration is that approximately 25k service life of fluid doesn't immediately become lifetime at some exact arbitrary point. "I towed 12 times in a year so I need to change at 25k but if I had towed only 11 times a year I can keep towing for 10 years without changing the fluid" Again it's simply a guide.

The actual life of the fluid will land on a scale somewhere between 25k and 300k miles.

There also exists a value in the ECU called "CVT Fluid Deterioration Rate". It is not clear to me how that translates into CVT fluid life, except that higher is worse and it seems related to high temperature conditions, such as those that may activate the transmission temperature warning.

CVT WRX and Forester XT guys add additional CVT coolers to extend the life of their transmissions. The WRX guys aren't towing, but they do put a lot of Load x Frequency if they autocross a lot. It's not as if just because they don't tow, their CVT fluid is impervious to degredation. There will still be wear, wear particles, heat, and shear to affect the fluid life because of Load x Frequency.

My intent isn't to say that everyone needs to change their CVT fluid frequently, or even ever. Never change your CVT fluid if your use of the vehicle is low load and it continues to function fine. If your vehicle use is frequent high load, you could consider changing it at the 4 year 11 month point if you only have a 5 year warranty. Or you could ignore that and change it at 24,885 or don't change it at all.
 

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Repeated Trailer Towing was the only EXAMPLE that they provided that was applicable to CVT fluid replacement. In this case, severe refers to Load x Frequency. The key word is example. It's not as if the use of an empty trailer "frequently" would qualify as severe service just because it was on a hitch. Similarly, a heavy load on the car without a trailer, going up hill, can be a lot of load on the transmission, hitch or not.
How much of a heavy load are you talking about? The published curb weight of the 2015 2.5i Premium is 3593 pounds and its GVWR on the driver's door jamb placard is 4695 lb, so the permissible maximum load of passengers and cargo is right at 1100 pounds. This is less than a third of 3600 lb, the maximum permissible cargo and passenger weight when towing (2700 lb per the owner's manual for trailer and its payload) plus cargo and passenger weight in the car (1100 lb) minus tongue weight (200 lb). So "a heavy load without a trailer, going up hill" is still fairly light compared with pulling even a 2000-lb trailer if you're operating within specifications. Of course it's possible to overload the car without using a trailer, and doing that could be considered "severe use", but isn't mentioned as such since it should also be considered "abuse".

Along those lines, a good rule of thumb might be if the weight of the trailer and everything on it plus the weight of the car and everything in and on it is less than the GVWR of the car, or even only slightly over it, then towing in that circumstance, even often, probably shouldn't be considered "severe" for the reason you give.

The other consideration is that approximately 25k service life of fluid doesn't immediately become lifetime at some exact arbitrary point. "I towed 12 times in a year so I need to change at 25k but if I had towed only 11 times a year I can keep towing for 10 years without changing the fluid" Again it's simply a guide.

The actual life of the fluid will land on a scale somewhere between 25k and 300k miles.
I can see where that 25,000 mile figure comes from, but don't forget that you apparently just pulled 300,000 miles out of thin air.

Yes, "frequent towing" is not defined and there is no clear delineation between "frequent" and "occasional". There are obvious cases that could only be considered occasional and other cases that are obviously frequent; how to classify usage in between these is pretty much up to the owner (and Subaru, if you're making a warranty claim), so it is probably worth erring on the side of more frequent changes if you're not completely sure where you land in that range.
There also exists a value in the ECU called "CVT Fluid Deterioration Rate". It is not clear to me how that translates into CVT fluid life, except that higher is worse and it seems related to high temperature conditions, such as those that may activate the transmission temperature warning.
It wouldn't surprise me at all if the transmission fluid deteriorated very rapidly at temperatures at and above the warning temperature set point. I presume that's why they have the warning. If that warning happens a lot and isn't spurious, it would probably be worth getting the fluid changed, and maybe reconsidering how you're using the car unless the warning really seems real but unprovoked, in which case some investigation into the cause would be called for. Do any of us here have sufficient information to characterize the effects of operating temperatures below the warning level on fluid lifetime in a meaningful way?

CVT WRX and Forester XT guys add additional CVT coolers to extend the life of their transmissions. The WRX guys aren't towing, but they do put a lot of Load x Frequency if they autocross a lot. It's not as if just because they don't tow, their CVT fluid is impervious to degredation. There will still be wear, wear particles, heat, and shear to affect the fluid life because of Load x Frequency.
Wouldn't frequent autocrossing be considered abuse, at least under the terms of the WRX's warranty? If you're abusing the car, then, yeah, that's almost the very definition of severe service and all bets are off. As to the Foresters, I really can't say why any particular owner would install a transmission cooler; a lot of people add all kinds of equipment to their cars because they think it makes them better in some ways. Sometimes they're right. Do Foresters not include transmission coolers as standard equipment like the Outbacks do? Apparently not. Is there a history of excessive transmission failures in Foresters in ordinary use that can be traced to this?

My intent isn't to say that everyone needs to change their CVT fluid frequently, or even ever. Never change your CVT fluid if your use of the vehicle is low load and it continues to function fine. If your vehicle use is frequent high load, you could consider changing it at the 4 year 11 month point if you only have a 5 year warranty. Or you could ignore that and change it at 24,885 or don't change it at all.
If the operation were completely risk-free, there would be little downside (except cost and waste) to changing the fluid as often as it takes to allow you to sleep at night, whether it's necessary or not. But, again, the story you related in your earlier post emphasizes an obvious reason why having the transmission fluid changed more often than necessary entails a non-trivial amount of risk to a very expensive part. Lacking significant evidence to the contrary, it's usually best to trust the engineering. As of now, according to the engineers, except in limited circumstances the benefits are speculative and the risks are real so they say changing the fluid is not necessary or desirable; that might change as additional real-world experience accumulates, or it might not.
 

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Lacking significant evidence to the contrary, it's usually best to trust the engineering. As of now, according to the engineers, except in limited circumstances the benefits are speculative and the risks are real so they say changing the fluid is not necessary or desirable; that might change as additional real-world experience accumulates, or it might not.
I'm not distrusting the engineering. I'm reading directly from the owner's manual and thinking about it.

For most cars, 300k can be reasonably be considered its full life, and which the CVT fluid has been proven to continue to function without being changed. Yes it's arbitrary, but a very reasonable number.

It's not speculative to say that the engineers who gave input to the manuals put 24,855 miles as a recommended change interval for repeated (unspecified number) towing (unspecified load). If you think that's nonsense, then you're the one distrusting the engineering.

As for the risk of doing a fluid change - that's why my plan is to do it a month before the warranty expires.
 

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I'm not distrusting the engineering. I'm reading directly from the owner's manual and thinking about it.
Me, too.

For most cars, 300k can be reasonably be considered its full life, and which the CVT fluid has been proven to continue to function without being changed. Yes it's arbitrary, but a very reasonable number.

It's not speculative to say that the engineers who gave input to the manuals put 24,855 miles as a recommended change interval for repeated (unspecified number) towing (unspecified load). If you think that's nonsense, then you're the one distrusting the engineering.
The source for that overly-exact number was most likely the authors of the owner's manual, not the engineers.

40,000. km (exactly) x 0.621371 miles/km = 24,854.84 mi, which is 24,855 miles when rounded to the nearest mile.

That distance in km is doubtless intended to be interpreted as having no more than two significant digits, meaning the converted distance is accurate to no more than about two significant digits, so the proper conversion is 25,000 miles.

My wife edits geology papers for a scientific journal (she's a geologist). The journal's policy is to state lengths and distances, as well as some other measurements, in both metric and US units. Far too often the authors, when told they need to do this, will take an approximate length, multiply it by an excessively exact conversion factor, and present that as a far more precise number than warranted, as in "the throw of this fault is approximately 10 meters (32.8084 feet) ..." Drives her nuts! Don't get her started about conversion of temperature gradients between °C per distance and °F per distance! Those are more often than not completely bollixed up!
As for the risk of doing a fluid change - that's why my plan is to do it a month before the warranty expires.
Sounds like a plan.
 

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My understanding is that Subaru has told dealerships to not do frequent CVT fluid changes. When I had mine done at 60,0000, the dealer tried to talk me out of it. My guess is Subaru has had to eat some transmissions after a botched fluid change job.

I'm now thinking I should have gotten the kit and sent it off for analysis. Oh well.
Right. My practice has always been early oil change on a new engine and transmission to flush out the left overs from assembly. So I had mine in at 500mi. Dealer did the engine but was adamant about not touching the trans.
 

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...That distance in km is doubtless intended to be interpreted as having no more than two significant digits, meaning the converted distance is accurate to no more than about two significant digits, so the proper conversion is 25,000 miles.

My wife edits geology papers for a scientific journal (she's a geologist). The journal's policy is to state lengths and distances, as well as some other measurements, in both metric and US units. Far too often the authors, when told they need to do this, will take an approximate length, multiply it by an excessively exact conversion factor, and present that as a far more precise number than warranted, as in "the throw of this fault is approximately 10 meters (32.8084 feet) ..." Drives her nuts! Don't get her started about conversion of temperature gradients between °C per distance and °F per distance! Those are more often than not completely bollixed up!
SigDigs were taught to me in 9th grade chemistry, yet I've worked with many engineers and PhDs that were completely clueless, just as you describe. I've watched them scale chemical processes by orders of magnitude, then turn around and hobble the whole thing attempting to keep the same mass precision when weighing raw materials. Her frustration is justified.
 

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I'm not distrusting the engineering.

For most cars, 300k can be reasonably be considered its full life,
I'm not saying you can't think a car's lifetime should be 300k, but basically most polymer based electrical component in your car is only tested to work for ~100,000 miles. What is considered passing is typically around 50% retention in mechanical properties. As long as you don't touch them, they won't typically just break on their own. But if you start disconnecting connectors on an old car all bets are off on if they will crack or not. I know it isn't necessarily related to a CVT, but it is also an important to thing to consider as part of the lifetime of a car.
 

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I'm not saying you can't think a car's lifetime should be 300k, but basically most polymer based electrical component in your car is only tested to work for ~100,000 miles. What is considered passing is typically around 50% retention in mechanical properties. As long as you don't touch them, they won't typically just break on their own. But if you start disconnecting connectors on an old car all bets are off on if they will crack or not. I know it isn't necessarily related to a CVT, but it is also an important to thing to consider as part of the lifetime of a car.
100,000 miles for that seems short, and I don't see why polymer deterioration would be based on mileage and not time, instead. Can you provide a link that explains that limitation?
 

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I'm not saying you can't think a car's lifetime should be 300k, but basically most polymer based electrical component in your car is only tested to work for ~100,000 miles. What is considered passing is typically around 50% retention in mechanical properties. As long as you don't touch them, they won't typically just break on their own. But if you start disconnecting connectors on an old car all bets are off on if they will crack or not. I know it isn't necessarily related to a CVT, but it is also an important to thing to consider as part of the lifetime of a car.
We're getting lost in minutia. I chose 300k because there have been Subaru owners who have gone 300k miles without changing their CVT fluid, and that there is no reasonable expectation that a car would necessarily last beyond that. Some cars have gone a million miles, but my guess is that they changed their transmission fluid at some point, along with spark plugs and other maintenance parts, fluids, and a few repairs along the way (e.g. alternator, fuel pump, water pump) Nobody in their right mind would suggest that the CVT fluid would last a million miles, so it would be unfair of me to use a million miles as the benchmark for "lifetime" CVT fluid.


On the second page several Subarus have exceeded 500k miles.

Subaru dedicated page: SUBARU HIGH MILEAGE CLUB


When people ask Irv Gordon – the guy with the 3.0-million-mile car – what they should do to follow his example, he has some surprisingly simple advice. "The first thing to do is read the owner's manual," he said. Gordon, other experts, and reports from high-mileage drivers all emphasize that you shouldn't cut any corners on routine maintenance.

Diligent maintenance can make "profound differences," according to Dillon, in how long your vehicle lasts and how it feels. In addition to the maintenance required by the manufacturer, he recommends regular flushing of critical fluids such as for the transmission, brakes, and power steering.
 

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100,000 miles for that seems short, and I don't see why polymer deterioration would be based on mileage and not time, instead. Can you provide a link that explains that limitation?
You are not wrong because it is certainly based on both, as time and temperature are equivalent for polymers. The reason for mileage is that miles correspond to an "at use" temperature. Depending on the location of the connection system, there is a certain temperature requirement that the part will need to meet. For example T2=105C, T3=125C, T4=150C continuous use for 3000hrs. Parts need to pass heat age testing at these temperatures for 3000 hrs with a certain level of property retention specified by the OEM. These parts are tested by many means (salt spray, temperature cycling, various automotive fluid resistance, dielectric properties, etc.. ), so that is just one test the part would need to meet.

As polymers are exposed to temperature and other environmental factors, they will over time degrade. This refers to a reduction in the molecular weight of the polymer and many important polymer properties are dependent on Mw. 100,000 miles is not that long of a time for a lot of people. But it is important to keep in mind that once these pieces are degraded, that doesn't necessarily mean "broken." In practice it comes down to the connector not being as flexible as it used to be, so if you try to engage and disengage a connector, depending on how it was designed, it may not have enough flexibility for the locking mechanisms to not break and retain the connections and terminals with as great of a force as it did when new.

As you would imagine, connectors in the interior of the car have much lower temperature requirements because the conditions to which they are exposed are much less severe.

My source is that I develop polymer compounds for connection systems and perform analytical work on components for a living :). If anyone wants to talk more about polymers I can on a different thread lol!
 

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it is pretty easy to change the fluid on this car, I would service it just like any other auto trans ie change it out on a regular bais. New fluid is never going to cause damage to your transmission so have at it.
 

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is there a report for someone going to 100k?
My '15 with 104K in shop today. I asked about CVT fluid change and he said wait till 120K. That was before he learned I had it done at 65K. When I hit 30K in '16 they were adamant that it should be done then since I was mostly driving short distances. Go figure.
 

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I'm at 122k at the moment and planning to replace the fluid myself pretty soon (a lot easier to do than I expected). I have replaced it twice by the dealer at 30k and 60k when I was using a trailer more often. I will be sure to take a sample to send in for testing as well.
 

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While we're getting lost in the minutiae:

Is it sigDigs or sigFigs?

I was always taught it was the latter.

Although now that I think on it it it might have just been who I learned from. He also taught to write charges in reverse.

Oxygen would have a 2- charge. Not -2 charge. Etc.

It could have just been a translation error.
 

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While we're getting lost in the minutiae:

Is it sigDigs or sigFigs?

I was always taught it was the latter.

Although now that I think on it it it might have just been who I learned from. He also taught to write charges in reverse.

Oxygen would have a 2- charge. Not -2 charge. Etc.

It could have just been a translation error.
I've heard both. If there's a difference in meaning, it's pretty subtle.
 
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