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The warranty is for the vehicle, so it should be good on yours. The droning sound even in neutral sounds like it might be a wheel bearing.
Yes on both counts. It was rear wheel bearings for the noise. Subaru checked out the car and it is the torque converter causing the weird stutter which is covered under the extended warranty. It is going to take them a few days to fix it.
 

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Yes on both counts. It was rear wheel bearings for the noise. Subaru checked out the car and it is the torque converter causing the weird stutter which is covered under the extended warranty. It is going to take them a few days to fix it.
Oh wow, you just dodged a major bullet. After going through the exact torque converter failure and repair, I can't recommend anyone purchase these models with over 100k miles. It's just too risky in an already expensive Subaru used market. They will need to drain the fluid and check for metal flakes as well. If they find any then it's an entire new CVT - which is $8k - $9k.
 

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So my 2012 with 83K will be getting a warranty replacement CVT. I am grateful that Subaru extended the warranty, but has the underlying problem with the CVT been fixed? No, it has not so with just dodging a major repair bill, do I keep a car with a flaw that can result in a huge repair bill down the road, possibly much earlier than the 83K I got? I think not.
 

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AvidHiker, You are rightly calling me out on my claim. I've looked for any documentation of design changes and have not found any. 2019's are having issues as well. Thus, it is only my belief that the same parts are being put back in these cars. I would love to be shown wrong. I bough my car with 60k on it and have no idea how it was treated before I bought it.
Since I've had it it's been babied.
 

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Here's my story:

2014 Crosstrek, 66k miles (automatic). In the last month I've had the engine stall twice. First time was while I was approaching an exit ramp on a freeway. The second time I was at (or approaching) a stoplight.

In both cases:
  • the dashboards shut off
  • I had been applying the brakes
  • I was able to put the car in park and start the car right away
  • no error codes or "check engine" light
The freeway one was particularly scary since I was going ~40mph, had cars behind me, and didn't have a shoulder to pull off onto.

I took my car in today and the dealership said that the mechanic found the issue to be the torque converter, and that it would be replaced under this extended warranty. My personal opinion is that Subaru had a heads up that there were quality issues.

I'm thinking I'll get rid of this car before I get to 100k miles.
 

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Here's my story:

2014 Crosstrek, 66k miles (automatic). In the last month I've had the engine stall twice. First time was while I was approaching an exit ramp on a freeway. The second time I was at (or approaching) a stoplight.

In both cases:
  • the dashboards shut off
  • I had been applying the brakes
  • I was able to put the car in park and start the car right away
  • no error codes or "check engine" light
The freeway one was particularly scary since I was going ~40mph, had cars behind me, and didn't have a shoulder to pull off onto.

I took my car in today and the dealership said that the mechanic found the issue to be the torque converter, and that it would be replaced under this extended warranty. My personal opinion is that Subaru had a heads up that there were quality issues.

I'm thinking I'll get rid of this car before I get to 100k miles.
Make sure you file a "vehicle safety complaint" with the NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration). All complaints are reviewed and taken seriously. It could lead to a recall instead of an extended warranty.


I filed one after similar experiences of my Outback having stalling issues in the middle of intersections as I was yielding a turn to on-coming traffic. Ended up being a faulty torque converter. Very scary.
 

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So, I got a letter today for Subaru informing me that they are extending the power train warranty for my CVT (I have a 2015 Outback). Does this mean that there have been issues with this transmission, I mean they don't extend warranties for no reason?
yes major issues with the torque converter
 

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So, Subaru replaced the CVT on my 2012 Outback with about 85K on it under the extended warranty. Since then it has been back to the dealer three times to try to fix a leak coming from the front diff or the CVT, I cant tell. I just got it back yesterday after the leak was found and fixed. This morning I see that it still leaking the same fluid in the same spot. I must say that SOA has been great through this experience, I just don't seem to have a dealer that can fix this car. Do lemon laws apply to extended warranty repairs? I really like how the car drives, but at a certain point I'm going to have to move on.
 

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... or it could be that the Subaru CVTs have proven to be so reliable in the field that they calculate the marketing benefits of a 100,000 mile transmission warranty far exceed the incremental cost of a small increase in warranty claims. There are many possible explanations, and I'm sure the folks at Subaru thought long and hard about it.
AvidHiker, You are rightly calling me out on my claim. I've looked for any documentation of design changes and have not found any. 2019's are having issues as well. Thus, it is only my belief that the same parts are being put back in these cars. I would love to be shown wrong. I bough my car with 60k on it and have no idea how it was treated before I bought it.
Since I've had it it's been babied.
I found my source, one of the two local dealerships. I spoke to the service manager at one and the transmission for the 2012 at least has recieved no upgrades. It's the same spec going back in, just re-manufactured. Awesome.
 

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Typically, they use revised components for any common failure points on re-manufactured transmissions. While technically the same specs, they'll have any revised internals, such as valve-body springs or valves, revised torque converters, and similar parts, know to be problematic. I seem to recall the original CVT's major failures were mainly a result of Valve-Body, Torque Converter issues, and occasionally a very specific pressure valve. (There was even a recall on some '19 & '20 models, primarily High-Torque units for the valve issue).

I haven't checked, but doesn't any major component replaced, even under warranty, carry a 12 mo / 12k Mile warranty? - Most manufacturers backup repairs for 12/12 at a minimum.

With the number of Subaru CVTs now floating around in the used car market, we should also start seeing Trans shops begin servicing them, as the parts become available. Of course, I'm still driving my '12 3.6R, equipped with the 5EAT.....takes a hit on mileage, but smooth, and responds to inputs from the go-pedal quickly. My wife's CVT equipped Crosstrek has been problem free, and we've considered buying it, come the end of her lease in October. (Although the new 2.5 Sport models look appealing).
 

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TSB16-90-13 states a revised torque converter is to be used in the reman. A change was made to the thrust washer and revised torque converters use the new washer. If a pressure test fails after reman CVT is installed, the valve body is to be replaced as well.

I thought I had a leak on a reman with 20,000 miles on it. When I contacted SOA, I was told the warranty on the reman was 1 year unlimited mileage or 2 years/24,000 miles whichever is more advantageous to the vehicle owner. All things considered, 24k warranty doesn't seem good enough. The original was warranted for 100,000 with bad parts in it. Just saying.....

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