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Very few people today know what a Quonset hut is, and even fewer know how it got the name. And still fewer yet have ever been in one!
Two out of three ain't bad. I know what it is, have been in one sometime in the last few years, but don't know how where the name came from. I'm sure I could Google it if I get curious enough.
 

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I'm not familiar with that term.
My knowledge of them is how they were allied with and enlisted the help of native Filipinos who's homes were occupied by Japanese. Filipinos volunteered/were sent in with machetes or various bladed weapons so as to not disclose their presence. (Rifles make noise. Element of surprise lost). After a handful of Filipino men displaced their uninvited visitors heads, the rest of the American sailors were called in to secure, fortify, (Sea Bees), build airfields, and maintain position. Sailors, marines, filipinos were known by their enemies as frightening tough men. I find the tactics Interesting since we are talking about native alies, small land masses surrounded by water and men we knew who were part of that incredibly huge war.
 

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Hi friends,

I have a delima that I seek your council with. I have a 2018 Outback 3.6R, and a couple weeks ago I brought it in for an oil change. The Subaru dealer is a bit out of town (~15 or so miles), and after they did the oil change I drove back and ran a few errands. The next day when I went to work, the Check Oil light came on as I was entering my work. Now, and I'm leaving out some details here, I work in a secure compound and at certain points along my drive I cannot stop my car, and so I had to keep driving for ~1/4 mile before I was able to stop. Once I did, when I checked the oil the dipstick came back completely dry. I called the dealer, and they drove up to meet me outside of my work, but the nearest exit was about ~3/4 mile away (total drive distance with check oil light on was ~1 mile). Essentially they put oil in and drove it back down to the dealer to check it out, and in the mean time they left me with a loaner. When they met me later in the day, the service manager said a couple things that stuck out to me: 1) "you can drive over a thousand miles after the check oil light comes on, it's just there to let you know to look into possible oil leaks" and 2) "You have 5 computers in this thing and we couldn't find any fault codes indicating that something was wrong. There is no way any damage occurred." Furthermore, he indicated that they hadn't actually forgot to put oil in, but rather their digital oil scale/filler was miscalibrated, and so it didn't put enough oil in. He then offered me a free oil change for the trouble, and promptly left.

This happened a couple weeks ago, and after thinking about it for a while I called Subaru customer support, and after they collected my data, they followed up with the dealer and then a representative called me back. He essentially repeated what the service manager said, but he said something that surprised me: that they underfilled my oil by less than a quart, and that the dipstick will come back dry if the oil pan is any more than one (1) quart low, and therefore I had over 4 quarts in the system and so there's no way that any damage could have possibly occurred. He offered me a $300 coupon for subaru service for my trouble.

I'm not a litigious or spiteful person, and I'm prepared to just move past this, however I'm fairly agitated. My brain tells me that it's unlikely that I incurred any damage to my engine from having driven 20 miles since the dealer and about 1 mile since the light came on, but there's no way to know for sure unless the engine is pulled apart, and moreover it's impossible to know how it will affect the long-term reliability of the engine. I also find it hard to believe that the entire range of the dipstick is less than 1 quart, but since I've never changed the oil on this car, I can't say for sure.

So I suppose my question for the audience is this: should I try to push this any further, given my circumstances, or should I accept the $300 (and free oil change) and move on with my life? I've lost a lot of confidence in Subaru service as a result of this, but I don't know how reasonable it is for me to expect Subaru to compensate me for this.

Thoughts?

Cheers,
IHateMayonnaise
For some peace of mind, consider this. After 6-7K mi on this oil, have your oil analyzed at Blackstone Labs. Cost is $25 for basic, another $10 to test how much additive remains. They do a detailed breakdown of all wear metals (from all bearings) and will tell you in the report if the engine wear is normal/typical for your vehicle at xx miles on the engine. Note there's also a Blackstone Labs that sells body building supplements, so get the right one.

You contact them first for a free test kit which they mail you. Send in a sample and they send a new free test kit and so on. You return in the regular mail. Yes, it's ok to mail used motor oil. Further, after you receive the report you can email the tech with any questions and get a dialog going if you have follow-up questions. They are very helpful and communicative. Example: I asked "what oil do you and your pals at work use?" Answer: "The cheapest conventional oil we can find on sale". This was a few yrs ago before many auto makers were specing synthetic oil. He stated the difference in wear metals, conventional to syn, was insignificant in normal use. None the less, I use syn for extra margin and extended drain intervals and get it cheap at Walmart.

If you were running dangerously low for x miles there's likely excessive wear metals in the mix that would show up in the analysis. If wear metals are normal and oil consumption is normal, I'd say you dodged a bullet and are fine. I'm on 2nd Outback (2008) and oil consumption on this one and the previous '98 is/was virtually zero, but some have seen a quart or so per change and the dealers say "normal". I've somehow been lucky with my vehicles (many decades) with near zero oil consumption. Today, the '08 Outback and '07 Honda Ridgeline. Same story on the truck.

An oil analysis is also informative when you do run the full 7500mi or whatever the car maker recommends for the change interval to see how much life is left in the oil, conventional or syn, assuming a major name brand. You will likely be pleasantly surprised. Oil lasts longer than most think, and black does not mean it's "worn out". It's just blow-by carbon in suspension. Carbon is black. I sent in a 2 year old sample with 7.5K mi and was told "give it another 1K mi next drain cycle". This was Napa 5-30 synthetic in the Outback 2.5i. ($3.50/qt on sale) I asked about going over 1 year and he said "oil does not go bad sitting in the garage.". Said he'd seen people go 3 years with no problems. This of course assumes no water or coolant in the oil. My water or coolant is always zero. If there's water/coolant in the oil.all bets are off and your engine needs immediate attention, though there is an additive in all reputable motor oils to mitigate a small amount of water from normal start-up condensation.

PS: Based in CA, I have nothing to do with Blackstone Labs in Indiana. Nor do I know anyone who works there. :)
 

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I have been changing oil for 50 years. It's so easy to do correctly that I am astonished that my dealer said my warranty would be affected if I did not have my oil changed by an ASE certified shop. I almost walked out before taking possession of my wife's 2019 Forester. A call to SOA confirmed that Subaru might ask to see evidence that I purchased the proper oil and filter at regular intervals. At 66 years old, I still say nobody can change oil better than I can.
Now, regarding driving your Subaru will oil low enough to illuminate the "Low oil level" indicator. It's not a problem. If you drove any distance with low oil PRESSURE, that would be a BIG problem. So, like others have posted, if you saw two oil warning indicators, then you should be concerned. If it was just "Low Oil Level", the worse that could happen is the engine may begin to overheat - The oil can dissipate more heat than the antifreeze coolant -especially if the thermostat has not yet opened. You did not mention excessive engine temperature, so I think your Subaru has not suffered.
Take the $300 service credit and be grateful, and if it was me, I would change my own oil. Yeah, it can be messy, but at least I know it was done correctly.
 

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I'd just move on as far as the underfilling is concerned, especially having been given some minor freebies. The only thing I'd be concerned about is trusting the dealer workshop going forward, so what I'd be pushing for is for them to explain how they have improved their systems to ensure that it never happens again to anyone, or I'd be going somewhere else next time.
 

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OK, so yes I posted the image of the two indicators described in the manual for the 2019. Now it gets more confusing, as I will post an image of another part of the manual (B/W), description (B/W), and an image from the quick start guide (Color).

I'm not sure my OB '19 has anything but a pressure indicator... :unsure: o_O
It could be that the indicator is two in one. The wavy line could be a separate indicator that just happens to be right below the oil can. It may be documented as two separate indicators due to the two lightly different meanings, but they may physically be in the same place on the dash.
 

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I've read through this and I'm not too crazy about Gomer Pyle.
The oil level light not coming on til the next day may be due to the sensor hanging up. It's happened with previous models, it either hangs up high or hangs up low after a drain and fill.
The dipstick - Dry dipstick is about 2 quarts low on any Subie. They fed you BS.
If the automated oil pump was not calibrated, how many more cars were under-filled? More BS.
The car can run fine with low oil, just not at high rpms for extended periods.
The weight of the oil is an issue. Too light oil after engine warm up reduces the ability to lubricate and operate the cam systems effectively.

If the dealership is so certain that there was no damage, there should not be an issue in covering the engine mechanical/internal components for 10/100. What do they have to lose? If they are correct, no loss, no cost. As long as the maintenance schedule is followed, as posted by Subaru/Fuji, then they can't say it's lack of maintenance and it can be traced back to this event. I hope they documented it and gave you a copy.

Once wear on a bearing starts, nothing can be done to stop it. The bearing surface will continue to wear at an accelerated rate no matter what you try to do. Score marks get bigger, surface area gets thinner. It's like tire wear. Once low pressure starts a wear pattern, correcting the pressure will not correct the wear rate. It will continue. Same with bad alignment to good alignment. Nothing can be done to change the wear pattern on the tire.

As long as the engine had about 3 quarts in it, there's a high probability that there is no damage. Since the oil pressure light didn't come on, I'd say you may be in the clear.
 

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Hi friends,

I have a delima that I seek your council with. I have a 2018 Outback 3.6R, and a couple weeks ago I brought it in for an oil change. The Subaru dealer is a bit out of town (~15 or so miles), and after they did the oil change I drove back and ran a few errands. The next day when I went to work, the Check Oil light came on as I was entering my work. Now, and I'm leaving out some details here, I work in a secure compound and at certain points along my drive I cannot stop my car, and so I had to keep driving for ~1/4 mile before I was able to stop. Once I did, when I checked the oil the dipstick came back completely dry. I called the dealer, and they drove up to meet me outside of my work, but the nearest exit was about ~3/4 mile away (total drive distance with check oil light on was ~1 mile). Essentially they put oil in and drove it back down to the dealer to check it out, and in the mean time they left me with a loaner. When they met me later in the day, the service manager said a couple things that stuck out to me: 1) "you can drive over a thousand miles after the check oil light comes on, it's just there to let you know to look into possible oil leaks" and 2) "You have 5 computers in this thing and we couldn't find any fault codes indicating that something was wrong. There is no way any damage occurred." Furthermore, he indicated that they hadn't actually forgot to put oil in, but rather their digital oil scale/filler was miscalibrated, and so it didn't put enough oil in. He then offered me a free oil change for the trouble, and promptly left.

This happened a couple weeks ago, and after thinking about it for a while I called Subaru customer support, and after they collected my data, they followed up with the dealer and then a representative called me back. He essentially repeated what the service manager said, but he said something that surprised me: that they underfilled my oil by less than a quart, and that the dipstick will come back dry if the oil pan is any more than one (1) quart low, and therefore I had over 4 quarts in the system and so there's no way that any damage could have possibly occurred. He offered me a $300 coupon for subaru service for my trouble.

I'm not a litigious or spiteful person, and I'm prepared to just move past this, however I'm fairly agitated. My brain tells me that it's unlikely that I incurred any damage to my engine from having driven 20 miles since the dealer and about 1 mile since the light came on, but there's no way to know for sure unless the engine is pulled apart, and moreover it's impossible to know how it will affect the long-term reliability of the engine. I also find it hard to believe that the entire range of the dipstick is less than 1 quart, but since I've never changed the oil on this car, I can't say for sure.

So I suppose my question for the audience is this: should I try to push this any further, given my circumstances, or should I accept the $300 (and free oil change) and move on with my life? I've lost a lot of confidence in Subaru service as a result of this, but I don't know how reasonable it is for me to expect Subaru to compensate me for this.

Thoughts?

Cheers,
IHateMayonnaise
I agree with iamian. With that said, I have a '13 Outback that consumes about a quart of oil every 1,800mi. Subaru did a consumption test and stated consumption was normal. There have been times on a trip where the oil light has come on (solid lit - not blinking) and I've driven the car 800mi with the light on (dipstick showed down a quart). That was about 60K mi ago. Car currently has 112K and isn't performing any differently. I'm guessing you're fine but the extra warranty coverage may give you additional piece of mind.
 

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I agree with iamian. With that said, I have a '13 Outback that consumes about a quart of oil every 1,800mi. Subaru did a consumption test and stated consumption was normal. There have been times on a trip where the oil light has come on (solid lit - not blinking) and I've driven the car 800mi with the light on (dipstick showed down a quart). That was about 60K mi ago. Car currently has 112K and isn't performing any differently. I'm guessing you're fine but the extra warranty coverage may give you additional piece of mind.
 

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I agree with iamian. With that said, I have a '13 Outback that consumes about a quart of oil every 1,800mi. Subaru did a consumption test and stated consumption was normal. There have been times on a trip where the oil light has come on (solid lit - not blinking) and I've driven the car 800mi with the light on (dipstick showed down a quart). That was about 60K mi ago. Car currently has 112K and isn't performing any differently. I'm guessing you're fine but the extra warranty coverage may give you additional piece of mind.
From Subaru Service Bulletin 02-157-14R; 8/28/2014; Revised 11/14/2016

The oil consumption test is for them to change the oil and filter. The engine oil level is checked at 1200 miles for consumption amount. The test only requires 1/3 quart consumption in 1200 miles. That's in the bulletin. If you're going through a quart in 1800, you'd qualify. The bulletin also states that a one time occurrence is all that is necessary to confirm.

Once it's confirmed the engine is using oil, a new small block is installed.

Did they wait until 1800 miles to check the oil level?
Does the light come on prior to the 1200 miles mark?
How did they measure the oil quantity in the engine? They are supposed to receive the vehicle, park it on a level surface and wait 5 minutes before checking the level.

Don't let the dealer put you off. They get paid by SOA to do the work, just not the regular rate and they can't mark up the engine cost because SOA ships it to them free.
 

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FWIW - I looked at my '19 2.5i, and under the Oil filter, in the vacinity of the filter are what looks like two sensors. I presume one is pressure and one is level, but I'm not positive. Maybe there are two pressure sensors there, and the level is somewhere else. ;)

Anyway, looks like the simple indicator with the oil can doesn't have a wavy line under it. But, I think if the level was an issue, there would be some big graphic on the center display... Can someone confirm? When my dash self-tests on startup, the oil can appears by itself (I believe for pressure), and not with another wavvy-line indicator underneath for level.
 

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FWIW - I looked at my '19 2.5i, and under the Oil filter, in the vacinity of the filter are what looks like two sensors. I presume one is pressure and one is level, but I'm not positive. Maybe there are two pressure sensors there, and the level is somewhere else. ;)

Anyway, looks like the simple indicator with the oil can doesn't have a wavy line under it. But, I think if the level was an issue, there would be some big graphic on the center display... Can someone confirm? When my dash self-tests on startup, the oil can appears by itself (I believe for pressure), and not with another wavvy-line indicator underneath for level.
The dash lights are also different colors... where there is a level warning, it's yellow, where it's a pressure warning it's red. They don't change colors.... the one in the outback is red. There is no warning LED for oil level, so that one will be in the multifunction display between the speedometer and the tachometer. Like when you get a low pressure tire warning.

you can see what dedicated warning lights are available during the power on self test of the dash lights at startup.
 

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Very few people today know what a Quonset hut is, and even fewer know how it got the name. And still fewer yet have ever been in one!
My family lived in one for a while when my dad first got transferred to Atsugi, Japan. It was a month before he was able to find off base housing for us. 1967, I was 9 years old . . .

I never knew how it got its name until you made me look it up, thank you Wikipedia!
 
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