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I just replaced the OEM battery in my 07 Outback with a DieHard Platinum Group 35, which is on sale online with in-store pickup. BTW this is identical to the much more expensive Odyssey AGM battery:

DieHard Platinum Battery : Best Car Battery Deals at Sears

The general dimensions are the same, but the top of the Platinum is stepped inwards, so the stabilizing ears on the Subaru hold down bar are 0.3 inches away from each side, so there is nothing to keep the battery from shifting back and forth under driving loads and rough roads. Since this battery is much heavier than the OEM one, I am a little worried.

For now I have glued some rubber blocks under the ears, but I don't expect them to last long and they aren't a good fit. Can anyone recommend a solution, perhaps an adjustable bar (that can be adjusted width-wise)? I don't want to spend $$$ on an Odyssey aluminum mount kit. I may have to build a new bar of my own design out of aluminum bar stock.

I'll post a pic of the installed battery shortly.

Thanks.

John Davies
Spokane WA USA
 

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Discussion Starter #2
It's a nice looking battery and really stands out with its gray case:



This shows the front part of the hold down bar with the gap and rubber piece installed:



John Davies
Spokane WA USA
 

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Is it attached to the car at all other than the cables? Move it around, how much does it move? I'll be honest, IMHO I probably wouldn't be that worried about it. The bottom battery bracket on my old '95 Grand Prix had rusted away... only thing really holding it in was the washer fluid reservoir on top of it. Drove it for 2 years like that without incident.
 

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Is it attached to the car at all other than the cables? Move it around, how much does it move? I'll be honest, IMHO I probably wouldn't be that worried about it. The bottom battery bracket on my old '95 Grand Prix had rusted away... only thing really holding it in was the washer fluid reservoir on top of it. Drove it for 2 years like that without incident.
Sorry, I am not going to let it go as is. Regardless of your own experience (!) I won't drive on rough forest roads with a marginally secure battery. I won't risk it getting loose and shorting out in a crash or rollover.

The only thing keeping the battery from shifting is the friction between the top of the case and the bottom of the bar. There needs to be some support on the sides. I can't reef down on the hold down rods since they are only 6 mm, and the bar will bow up in the middle since there are those pesky overhangs....

One possibility is a piece of heavy sheet rubber under the battery (a piece of mudflap), in place of the plastic drip tray. That would serve to anchor it better. Since the battery is completely sealed there is no need for any sort of sealed catch pan. Unfortunately there is minimal clearance where the battery tucks under the sheet metal at the fender, so I would have to do some cutting and grinding ;(

John Davies
Spokane WA USA
 

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Sorry, I am not going to let it go as is. Regardless of your own experience (!) I won't drive on rough forest roads with a marginally secure battery. I won't risk it getting loose and shorting out in a crash or rollover.

The only thing keeping the battery from shifting is the friction between the top of the case and the bottom of the bar. There needs to be some support on the sides. I can't reef down on the hold down rods since they are only 6 mm, and the bar will bow up in the middle since there are those pesky overhangs....

One possibility is a piece of heavy sheet rubber under the battery (a piece of mudflap), in place of the plastic drip tray. That would serve to anchor it better. Since the battery is completely sealed there is no need for any sort of sealed catch pan. Unfortunately there is minimal clearance where the battery tucks under the sheet metal at the fender, so I would have to do some cutting and grinding ;(

John Davies
Spokane WA USA
It wasn't "marginally secure"... it didn't move. In that 2 year period I slid off the road and went through a fence and ran over a deer... never once did the battery get loose.
 

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Your current hack looks like it would work long term, otherwise maybe make up some stepped shims from wood trim stock?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I didn't get any leads to a new bar that fits better, so I made my own out of a nice scrap piece of 6061-T6 bar stock that I picked up at a metal supply company for about US$4.00. Because there is no slop in the fit, the battery is held dead tight with no movement.





I didn't bother painting it since these AGM batteries are sealed up tight and don't vent any corrosive fumes.

John Davies
Spokane WA USA
 

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Looks bomb proof.

What did you use to cut it?
LOL - I wish I could say I used a vertical mill. I sure would like to have one and the skill to use it....

I actually did most of it with hand tools. I have a big coarse flat file that I used for years to dress out stone damage on aircraft propellers back when I was an A&P. It has been nearly two decades since I quit that work.

It has widely spaced curved teeth, is single cut, and has no teeth on the sides. You take long strokes and the aluminum comes off in nice shavings and usually doesn't clog the file. It makes fast work of aluminum, but it still took me three hours to make the durn thing.

You have to buy one from an aircraft specialty supply - they are very expensive and are not common. Mine was used and I got it from Boeing Surplus in Seattle.



I used a standard 1/2 to 1 inch step drill bit in my drill press to make the lightening holes,including the chamfers. They dress up an otherwise plain piece of metal.

It turned out nice, which is a good feeling when you spent half a day screwing with it ;)

Odyssey makes a bunch of exotic alloy hold down kits - I am sure one will fit this battery which is made by Odyssey for Sears. I didn't want to spend $150 on one. ... http://shop.odysseybattery.com/c/accessories_hold-down-kits

John Davies
Spokane WA USA
 

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How about a piece of rubber hose on the center bar. Slit the piece lengthways and wrap it around the center bar. As you say, any piece of rubber under that bar would help against shifting.
 

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The best is to put non-skid black tape on the bottom of the battery well - same kind that kids put on their skateboards. It's available in any skateboard shop. I have used it before on other cars, when I replaced batteries with the size other than OEM.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It's only about six months since it was installed, but how's the Diehard Platinum flat-plate AGM battery performing?
It is doing fine with no issues. It cranks the engine quickly and has a lot of reserve capacity, and what else can you really say about a battery? I will be able to judge better after five or six years.

It and the alloy hold down make me smile whenever I open the hood. It adds some nice bling to the engine compartment.

So far I give this battery five stars, if you use a proper hold down.

One downside is that to get any AGM battery to 100% capacity, you have to charge it with an expensive charger rated for gel batteries. A car alternator will charge it most of the way, but it never gets fully topped up. But it still has more available juice than a regular lead acid battery. This charger is on my wish list, and the price dropped US$15 in the last six months:

Odyssey OMAX-25A-1B

John Davies
Spokane WA USA
 

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The best is to put non-skid black tape on the bottom of the battery well - same kind that kids put on their skateboards. It's available in any skateboard shop. I have used it before on other cars, when I replaced batteries with the size other than OEM.
That sounds like an excellent cheap fix, but I still feel better when the mount itself eliminates any possible movement. And with my free labor, my bracket cost US$4....

John Davies
Spokane WA USA
 

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It is doing fine with no issues. It cranks the engine quickly and has a lot of reserve capacity, and what else can you really say about a battery? I will be able to judge better after five or six years.

It and the alloy hold down make me smile whenever I open the hood. It adds some nice bling to the engine compartment.

So far I give this battery five stars, if you use a proper hold down.

One downside is that to get any AGM battery to 100% capacity, you have to charge it with an expensive charger rated for gel batteries. A car alternator will charge it most of the way, but it never gets fully topped up. But it still has more available juice than a regular lead acid battery. This charger is on my wish list, and the price dropped US$15 in the last six months:

Odyssey OMAX-25A-1B

John Davies
Spokane WA USA
would this one work? (< $50)

Amazon.com: Battery Tender 021-0128 Battery Tender Plus 12V Battery Charger: Automotive
 

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