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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I'm new to this forum so thanks in advance for your help. l Will try and fix this stalling issue myself B4 I go to the professionals and pay big$.
2013 Diesel Outback Cvt premium 175,000ks.
Melbourne, Australia.

Noticed an issue 2 months back, it has always started great straight away within half a second hot or cold.
Then it started to occasionally misfire on startup and would have to start a second time and it starts ok.
Gradually this became more frequent, but now when it starts ok and runs for a short time then stalls. It can stall within 1 second or can idle normally for 5, 10 seconds or longer then stall. It dosen't run rough, it just cuts out. Sometimes it idles for 30 seconds then I put it into gear (reverse or Drive) starts moving then cuts out. Sometimes it's been ok and I've driven it for 20 minutes and no problems, but next time same stalling issues come back.

Checks I've done so far.
-Spare key, same problem
-Key batterys are good.
-Immobilizer seems to be working properly, light turns off when key inserted and started. Stays off when stalled.
-Battery tested and connections look fine
-No fault codes.
-Service done after this issue started, new oil air & fuel filter.

Any advice from you guys would be much appreciated.

Cheers Dale.
 

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MY17 Outback Diesel Premium
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The only time I have had a random stalling issue in a car was when I had some crap in the fuel tank. The crap would randomly block the fuel line from the tank and starve the engine. When the engine stalled, the crap would drop away from the fuel line intake and the car would restart and the random cycle would repeat.

In aircraft in tropical conditions water from condensation can build up in the tank to the point where it will block the fuel line (ie the engine sucks in water instead of fuel). The random nature then depends on the slope of the car at the time (ie the slope of the tank then determines the depth of the water at the fuel intake line).

The solution was to run the car down to near empty. Have a few liters of fresh clean fuel in a jerry can. Drain the fuel tank into a glass container. See what comes out - crud, water etc. If it is water from condensation, it may be your answer and skip the next bit.

<CAUTION - I have not done this on an Outback, so this is generic advice>

Now the stinky bit. You may need a new fuel pump access panel gasket.

Park the car somewhere level and well ventilated.

Access the fuel tank (in the Outback you remove the lower half of the rear seat). In the car I had at the time, I could remove the fuel tank from the car and clean it out seperately.

Open up the fuel pump access panel <MAJOR WARNING - you now have an open tank filled with fuel fumes. Any spark or flame could cause an explosion or fire. Be careful about static build up.> The fuel pump may be attached to the access panel. Have a bucket in the car handy to place it in so you don't get drips of fuel on the carpet or seats.

Have a look inside the tank using a water proof torch (these are sealed and won't be an ignition source). Don't put the torch inside, just shine in through the opening. <Don't drop anything into the fuel tank - empty your pockets before you bend over!>.

If you still have crud in the tank, give it a rinse with some of the clean fuel. You can also use methylated spirits - just don't leave a lot of metho in the tank afterwards as it will dilute the fuel. If you still have large crud you may be able to fish it out by hand or with grabbers.

Check the condition of the access plate gasket. Replace if necessary. Replace the fuel pump access panel.

Replace the rear seat. Put your new clean fuel into the tank.

Leave the windows or doors open and go and have a coffee (or two). It will take some time for the diesel smell to dissipate.

Hopefully that may fix the issue. Take the car to the nearest fuel station and fill up.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Wow thanks Bergfalke that's an awesome reply.
I'll definitely do this and see how it goes. I think your on the right track with a fuel issue. Give me a week or so (I'll keep riding my bicycle to work) and I'll report back to you.

Thanks Dale
 

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Other random thought. Check the wiring and the wiring connectors to the fuel pump. before opening up the tank.

Diesel engines keep running providing they get air and fuel. You can stall them by brute force ie apply enough torque against the engine that it doesn't have enough torque to complete the next compression stroke. The only other way is to block the air or the fuel supply.

The random nature of the stalling suggests intermittent fuel fault of some sort.

Some clues might be to note whether it stalls more frequently when the tank is low (or high) or whether the car is on a slope in a particular direction.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The only time I have had a random stalling issue in a car was when I had some crap in the fuel tank. The crap would randomly block the fuel line from the tank and starve the engine. When the engine stalled, the crap would drop away from the fuel line intake and the car would restart and the random cycle would repeat.

In aircraft in tropical conditions water from condensation can build up in the tank to the point where it will block the fuel line (ie the engine sucks in water instead of fuel). The random nature then depends on the slope of the car at the time (ie the slope of the tank then determines the depth of the water at the fuel intake line).

The solution was to run the car down to near empty. Have a few liters of fresh clean fuel in a jerry can. Drain the fuel tank into a glass container. See what comes out - crud, water etc. If it is water from condensation, it may be your answer and skip the next bit.

<CAUTION - I have not done this on an Outback, so this is generic advice>

Now the stinky bit. You may need a new fuel pump access panel gasket.

Park the car somewhere level and well ventilated.

Access the fuel tank (in the Outback you remove the lower half of the rear seat). In the car I had at the time, I could remove the fuel tank from the car and clean it out seperately.

Open up the fuel pump access panel <MAJOR WARNING - you now have an open tank filled with fuel fumes. Any spark or flame could cause an explosion or fire. Be careful about static build up.> The fuel pump may be attached to the access panel. Have a bucket in the car handy to place it in so you don't get drips of fuel on the carpet or seats.

Have a look inside the tank using a water proof torch (these are sealed and won't be an ignition source). Don't put the torch inside, just shine in through the opening. <Don't drop anything into the fuel tank - empty your pockets before you bend over!>.

If you still have crud in the tank, give it a rinse with some of the clean fuel. You can also use methylated spirits - just don't leave a lot of metho in the tank afterwards as it will dilute the fuel. If you still have large crud you may be able to fish it out by hand or with grabbers.

Check the condition of the access plate gasket. Replace if necessary. Replace the fuel pump access panel.

Replace the rear seat. Put your new clean fuel into the tank.

Leave the windows or doors open and go and have a coffee (or two). It will take some time for the diesel smell to dissipate.

Hopefully that may fix the issue. Take the car to the nearest fuel station and fill up.
Hi again. Just reporting back. Fuel tank and pump check done. Tank is clean, pump is clean including the little mesh filter on the bottom. Cleaned all connections with electric contact cleaner. Tested the pump and it works fine, as in it was pumping plenty of fuel.
Still have the same problem with first start up stalling, and all good once car is warm.

I have done some more research and a Forrester owner (2010 manual Diesel forester with the EE20 Diesel engine). Had very similar issues.
Subaru dealer said it was a timing chain issue $2100 fix.
He decided to have it done and so far after 10 days it has resolved the problem. Replaced timing chain, car runs smoother and fuel economy has improved.

A few other guys with the same issue are now trying to get some extra info from him but no answer yet.

I'm considering replacing the Timing chain, guides etc myself to save some $.
Has anyone done this, I'm guessing it's a big job but if its relatively straight forward and no special tools required I'll give it a go. I'm a fitter by trade and have replaced head gaskets etc.

All replies welcome
Dale.
 
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