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I wish I was in a place where a free update to a distance to empty display and a trip to the dealer was my biggest complaints about life.


It’s not a “free update.”

It’s a recall on a flawed product.

Some of us have more important things to do than making extra trips to a car dealer.


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Discussion Starter #22
Perhaps you should find a vehicle that doesn't have any built in software, then they won't have to impose on you for occasional software updates. A bicycle, for example, should fit your "no software updates" requirements just fine.:grin2:

That's kind of a stupid point of view.


I can update my PC, both software and BIOS.
I can update my phone software.
I can update my TV software.
I can update my Modem software.
I can update my Golf Buddy software.
I can update my Garmin software.


But I can't update my Subaru software.


Isn't the conclusion obvious?
 

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Isn't the conclusion obvious?
Yeah:
That's kind of a stupid point of view.
You can't drive your PC anywhere.
You can't drive your phone anywhere.
You can't drive your TV anywhere.
You can't drive your modem anywhere.
You can't drive your Golf Buddy anywhere.
You can't drive your Garmin anywhere.
But you can drive your Subaru anywhere in the country.

Edit - Management Summary: A motor vehicle isn't a PC ... or a phone ... or a TV ... or a modem ... or a Golf Buddy ... or a Garmin.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Yeah:
That's kind of a stupid point of view.
You can't drive your PC anywhere.
You can't drive your phone anywhere.
You can't drive your TV anywhere.
You can't drive your modem anywhere.
You can't drive your Golf Buddy anywhere.
You can't drive your Garmin anywhere.



But, you see, they are all computer systems. OK?
All but one can be updated. OK?


I'm sorry you are struggling so hard to comprehend something so obvious.



It is obvious you are in love with your car and I didn't mean to hurt your feeling by pointing out a flaw in something you love.
 

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Brucey
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It’s not a “free update.”

It’s a recall on a flawed product.

Some of us have more important things to do than making extra trips to a car dealer.


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So then don't go to the dealer.

Don't trust the distance to empty display.

They shouldn't be trusted in the first place.

They weren't accurate 30 years ago and they're not accurate now.
 

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That's kind of a stupid point of view.


I can update my PC, both software and BIOS.
I can update my phone software.
I can update my TV software.
I can update my Modem software.
I can update my Golf Buddy software.
I can update my Garmin software.


But I can't update my Subaru software.


Isn't the conclusion obvious?
You discovered that systems that are considered likely to need updates are easy to update, while systems that are not expected to need to be updated are harder. How long have you been driving, and have you ever needed to have gauge cluster software updated before? It sure looks like Subaru never expected to need to do in-the-field updates, since the dealers didn't have the necessary tools on hand to be able to do it. And can you understand why they might not want to make it easy for an end-user to update the software on the device that stores and displays the odometer?

My Instant Pot is computer-controlled, but I can't update it. I guess it's useless. Or maybe they figured that once you bought one, the odds of needing to update the software on it is pretty slim.

So which of the items you listed are subject to the same FMVSS/NHTSA/DOT regulations as your Subaru? And which of them have NHTSA-regulated recalls on them? As soon as an issue becomes a recall, there's a list of obligations that are imposed on the manufacturer... things like being able to maintain a list of affected vehicles, and the repair status of each vehicle. Go look at the thread on the radio head unit recall for MY 18 vehicles; even though it is possible for the user to update the radio software (via the Subaru Map Updater), the fix for that recall was dealer-only. And they even kept you from download updates through the map updater until after your car was flagged as fixed. Compared to other vehicles I've owned, I'm actually pretty impressed that the only recalls on my Outback have been fixable by quick software updates, and have been pretty low-impact.

Finally, you also can't update the software on your ECU, Transmission, Body Control Module, and probably some others. These are more likely to need updates than the gauge cluster (see for example the updates for short-trip battery charging and the door lock lockout with flashers on, as well as a bunch of other TSB's), and yet they're all dealer-applied-only. And this is all pretty much standard in the automotive industry; except for a few performance cars, if you want to tune your ride you have to either go through a dealer to have a specific manufacturer tune installed, or add a piggyback tuner.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
You discovered that systems that are considered likely to need updates are easy to update, while systems that are not expected to need to be updated are harder. How long have you been driving, and have you ever needed to have gauge cluster software updated before? It sure looks like Subaru never expected to need to do in-the-field updates, since the dealers didn't have the necessary tools on hand to be able to do it. And can you understand why they might not want to make it easy for an end-user to update the software on the device that stores and displays the odometer?

My Instant Pot is computer-controlled, but I can't update it. I guess it's useless. Or maybe they figured that once you bought one, the odds of needing to update the software on it is pretty slim.

So which of the items you listed are subject to the same FMVSS/NHTSA/DOT regulations as your Subaru? And which of them have NHTSA-regulated recalls on them? As soon as an issue becomes a recall, there's a list of obligations that are imposed on the manufacturer... things like being able to maintain a list of affected vehicles, and the repair status of each vehicle. Go look at the thread on the radio head unit recall for MY 18 vehicles; even though it is possible for the user to update the radio software (via the Subaru Map Updater), the fix for that recall was dealer-only. And they even kept you from download updates through the map updater until after your car was flagged as fixed. Compared to other vehicles I've owned, I'm actually pretty impressed that the only recalls on my Outback have been fixable by quick software updates, and have been pretty low-impact.

Finally, you also can't update the software on your ECU, Transmission, Body Control Module, and probably some others. These are more likely to need updates than the gauge cluster (see for example the updates for short-trip battery charging and the door lock lockout with flashers on, as well as a bunch of other TSB's), and yet they're all dealer-applied-only. And this is all pretty much standard in the automotive industry; except for a few performance cars, if you want to tune your ride you have to either go through a dealer to have a specific manufacturer tune installed, or add a piggyback tuner.



Yawn. Zzzzzzzz.
 

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What we don't have yet in this thread, as we've had in many other very similar ones, is a crotchety old-timer posting that one should never let their gas gauge go below 1/4 regardless of what the lights indicate, and then mocking everyone that ran out of gas alongside of the road at some point.
 

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What we don't have yet in this thread, as we've had in many other very similar ones, is a crotchety old-timer posting that one should never let their gas gauge go below 1/4 regardless of what the lights indicate, and then mocking everyone that ran out of gas alongside of the road at some point.
Ok I will. "...one should never let their gas gauge go below 1/4 regardless of what the lights indicate...." Yes, you would be a low IQ neanderthal imbecile for running out of gas.

Laughing at oneself and with others is good for the Soul!
 

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Perhaps you should find a vehicle that doesn't have any built in software, then they won't have to impose on you for occasional software updates. A bicycle, for example, should fit your "no software updates" requirements just fine.:grin2:
Guess you haven't seen a fully tricked out professional road bike in awhile... :smile2:
 

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What we don't have yet in this thread, as we've had in many other very similar ones, is a crotchety old-timer posting that one should never let their gas gauge go below 1/4 regardless of what the lights indicate, and then mocking everyone that ran out of gas alongside of the road at some point.

Well.....

I don't use either one. I just look at the gauge. If it reads anywhere near 1/4 then I waited longer than normal to fill up.


I guess I was a little lacking on the crotchety and the mocking. I will have to work on that.:grin2:
 

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When I'm at 1/4 tank I fill it up. Never use distance to empty.

When i have the car in for the 18k service i'll let them do this so long as it doesn't delay me much. If it will, i don't need it.
 

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So then don't go to the dealer.

Don't trust the distance to empty display.

They shouldn't be trusted in the first place.

They weren't accurate 30 years ago and they're not accurate now.

Excellent point.

I've driven many late model rental cars that have that feature... couldn't care less what it said...

I go by the gas gauge, and when it drops below a quarter tank, I fill up.

I don't need some software to guesstimate how long it will be until I'm walking.>:)
 

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Since it also meant reprogramming the inaccurate gas gauge, which often showed more gas in the tank than there was, an invitation to running out of gas in the middle of nowhere, I had the update done yesterday. It took so little time that I just waited for it to be done.
Did it do any good? Too soon to tell.
 

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Brucey
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Since it also meant reprogramming the inaccurate gas gauge, which often showed more gas in the tank than there was, an invitation to running out of gas in the middle of nowhere, I had the update done yesterday. It took so little time that I just waited for it to be done.
Did it do any good? Too soon to tell.
Wait is it the gas gauge or the distance to empty display that's under the recall?
 

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Wait is it the gas gauge or the distance to empty display that's under the recall?
Distance to empty software logic. Below is the email I got.

If it was the gas gauge it would be serious. This is not.

**************

Important News - Please open and read immediately

*

Important Information



Subaru Service Program WUD-89
Distance-to-Empty Software Update

Regarding VIN: xx

Dear Subaru Owner:

We would like to thank you for your selection of a Subaru vehicle. We take pride in our products and are committed to your continued satisfaction.

Subaru has developed a software update to the Distance-to-Empty logic (which indicates how far you can travel on existing fuel levels) for certain 2017 model year Legacy and Outback vehicles. This software update is intended to ensure improved accuracy of your vehicle’s Distance-to-Empty feature which is displayed in the vehicle instrument panel.

You received this notice because our records indicate that you currently own one of these vehicles.

WHAT SUBARU WILL DO
Subaru will reprogram the Distance-to-Empty logic in your vehicle at no cost to you.

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO

Please contact your Subaru retailer (dealer) for an appointment to have the Distance-to-Empty software updated in your vehicle, free of charge.


HOW LONG WILL THE REPAIR TAKE?
The time to perform this software update is approximately 30 minutes. However, it may be necessary to leave your vehicle for a longer period of time on the day of your scheduled appointment to allow your Subaru retailer flexibility in scheduling.

CHANGED YOUR ADDRESS OR SOLD YOUR SUBARU?
If you have moved or sold your vehicle, please update this information online at www.subaru.com, select ‘Customer Support,’ then select ‘Address Update’ or ‘Ownership Update’ from the drop-down menu.

IF YOU HAVE PREVIOUSLY PAID FOR A REPAIR
If you have already paid for repairs associated with this coverage, you may be eligible for reimbursement. Reimbursement consideration will be based on the amount an authorized Subaru retailer in your area would charge for the same repair.

Please send the original service repair order, which has the name of the repair facility, date of repair, mileage at the time of repair, complete 17-digit vehicle identification number (VIN), and your name, with correct mailing address and telephone number to the address listed below.

Subaru of America, Inc.
Customer-Retailer Services Department, Attention: WUD-89 Service Program
P.O. Box 9103, Camden, NJ 08101-9877

Please send original receipts only and retain a photocopy for your records. Please be assured that we will attempt to process your reimbursement request as quickly as possible, but it may take up to 60 days for this process to be completed.

IF YOU NEED FURTHER ASSISTANCE:
To locate the nearest Subaru retailer, you can access our website at www.subaru.com and select ‘Find a Retailer.’

For additional information, please go to: http://www.wud89.service-campaign.com.

If you need additional assistance, please contact us directly: By email: Go to www.subaru.com/customer-support.html
By telephone: 1-844-373-6614 Monday through Friday between 8:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. ET

By U.S. Postal mail: Write us at Subaru of America, Inc.
Attn: Customer-Retailer Services Department
P.O. Box 9103, Camden, NJ 08101-9877

Please contact us immediately if the Subaru retailer fails or is unable to make the necessary repairs free of charge.

Your continued satisfaction with your Subaru is important to us.* Please understand that we have taken this action in the interest of your vehicle’s proper operation.* We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this matter may cause and urge you to schedule an appointment as soon possible.

Sincerely,
Subaru of America, Inc.

A subsidiary of SUBARU CORPORATION
 

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Had mine done this morning with the 36,000 mile service. Took an hour and a half all told. Probably the easiest recall fix I've ever had
 

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What we don't have yet in this thread, as we've had in many other very similar ones, is a crotchety old-timer posting that one should never let their gas gauge go below 1/4 regardless of what the lights indicate, and then mocking everyone that ran out of gas alongside of the road at some point.
That's because I wasn't hear to complain how I relied on the DTE on my brand new Outback, after doing the same for 3 years on my Legacy with no problems, and ran out of gas with 70 miles to go!

Why do I like to rely on the DTE? Because I get a discount from my local grocery store for a tank fill-up, regardless of how much gas I put in. So the more I put in, the more I save on discounted fuel. Unless I run out...

Others can always come up with reasons why I shouldn't utilize the technology I paid for, but even with being a long time computer systems expert, and understanding how techies can get carried away with overly fancy algorithms, I like the convenience, which is why I bought the car I did. If it doesn't work correctly, then it's a flawed product, regardless of why someone chooses to use the feature or not.
:smile2:
 
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