Subaru Outback Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Brucey
'17 3.6
Joined
·
11,412 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Here is a quick how to to make sway bar disconnects for less than 5$.

So here is where I'm at:

I've decided I love my sway bars when driving on the road.

I've also decided that they don't change the capability of the Outback all that much by leaving them on. My previous testing showed less than a 2" change in travel for the rear wheels.

A lot of Jeep guys take them off and it makes sense. However I still drive on road 95-98% of the time. It doesn't make sense to me to remove them permanently.

The newer Jeep Rubicon's (and Dodge Power Wagon) have electronic disconnect sway bars that split in half from a switch right in the dash. I would love to emulate this however I have better things to waste money on. :wink2:

I do think the sway bars make the ride a little rougher than it can be. Especially on dirt roads.

I was at the hardware store today and decided to look into sway bar disconnects and while trying to size out cotter pins / hitch pins I had an epiphany: why bother replacing it?

I already have a suitable pin for my sway bar.

So with that, here is the how to:

Parts needed:

2 count 3/16" by 1" Lynch pin (one for each side)

Here is a 2 pack on Amazon for under four dollars shipped.

Here is a an assortment 50 pack for under twenty dollars.

A washer. I used an M10 washer. You can likely use a 3/8" as well if you prefer freedom units.

Tools I used:

Drill or drill press with 3/16 drill bit.

Vice or some method to secure a bolt.

14mm socket wrench and wrench.

Sharpie (not required)

Center punch (not required)

Directions:


Start by removing the end link bolt. On a 2015-2019 Subaru Outback it's 14mm bolt with a 14mm nut on the other end. Note how far down the nut goes on the bolt. Mark the nut and take the nut and bolt and secure it. I put mine in a vice. Thread the nut onto the bolt so that it's at the same depth it sat when holding the end link on the car:



Mark the center of one of the faces of the nut and center punch it to prevent the drill bit from walking.

Drill the center of the face of the nut:



When you get to the bolt, congratulations, you're halfway there. Continue drilling.

Drill through the nut and bolt completely:



Once drilled through. Remove the nut. Confirm to see if your 3/16" pin will fit in your 3/16" hole.



Congratulations! You're done. You now have a quick disconnect sway bar and can now easily cross the Rubicon Trail or Woodpecker Mine in your otherwise stock Subaru Outback. :wink2:

Install is simple: Put the bolt through and use a washer and the lynch pin to hold the bolt in place.



When you get to a place you don't want your sway bars connected it's a simple process:

Pull the pin and then remove the bolt and washer. Hold onto all 3. You'll need them to reinstall.

I was able to do this on a 2017 Subaru Outback with an ADF 2" lift and 245/65/17 KO2 tires while the car was sitting on the ground. I would love to hear if there is enough room in stock form to perform the same task. Anyone want to contribute?

I believe this method will work for most Subaru Outbacks and possibly other Subaru's and even other brands.

As always, feedback welcome.

Stay frosty!
 

Attachments

·
Master Caster
2005 XT, Mildly Modified...2006 XT Limited, Highly Modifed
Joined
·
16,144 Posts
Stay Frosty. Really nice work. I'm sure it will make a bit of noise, but for wheeling trips, that's an easy trade off.
 

·
Brucey
'17 3.6
Joined
·
11,412 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Stay Frosty. Really nice work. I'm sure it will make a bit of noise, but for wheeling trips, that's an easy trade off.
I've noticed a subtle click now.

I was thinking a rubber washer or possibly a lock washer could dampen it.
 

·
Registered
2015 Outback Limited 3.6r
Joined
·
351 Posts
How difficult was it to remove the pin while the bolt was in the frame? It looks like there would be some great pressure there, plus you'd be pulling the pin at an awkward angle a little bit, no?
You successfully tested it out so I'm very impressed it worked so well!
Let us know how a rubber washer would work for noise/vibrations.
 

·
Master Caster
2005 XT, Mildly Modified...2006 XT Limited, Highly Modifed
Joined
·
16,144 Posts
I've noticed a subtle click now.

I was thinking a rubber washer or possibly a lock washer could dampen it.
The bushing that is in the endlink has a metal crush sleeve and then a rubber component. The torqued bolt locks the metal sleeve in place and the the rubber is locked and the endlink has some damping. Unless this lower bushing gets torqued and locked, there will always be some noise due to movement.

I don't see your design being something used on a daily driver. Unless its like some Jeeps and trucks, all it really is is a "wheeler". Guys like that will put up with that type of NVH.

I see this a solution for someone who is going wheeling on the weekend. The disconnects go in for the weekend and the bolts go back in for DD.

Hmmm. Maybe some nylon washers, like a fender washer. My True Value has these in all types of thickness and sizes. They actually deform over time but I am talking a coupe months. I used them inplace of metal washers when I installed solid front endlinks to help reduce the NVH.
 

·
Master Caster
2005 XT, Mildly Modified...2006 XT Limited, Highly Modifed
Joined
·
16,144 Posts
How difficult was it to remove the pin while the bolt was in the frame? It looks like there would be some great pressure there, plus you'd be pulling the pin at an awkward angle a little bit, no?
You successfully tested it out so I'm very impressed it worked so well!
Let us know how a rubber washer would work for noise/vibrations.
I would think one would need to drive the bolt, punch and a hammer. Unless you can get parked with no load on the bar. But I would like it would be difficult, just not something done with frozen fingers by hand.

I like it alot.
 

·
Brucey
'17 3.6
Joined
·
11,412 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
How difficult was it to remove the pin while the bolt was in the frame? It looks like there would be some great pressure there, plus you'd be pulling the pin at an awkward angle a little bit, no?
You successfully tested it out so I'm very impressed it worked so well!
Let us know how a rubber washer would work for noise/vibrations.
Removing the bolt was super easy. Just a 14mm socket and wrench. I just continued reversing the bolt out and it pushed itself out.

The reinstall was slightly harder. I had to push the end link up some by pushing the bar up. Nothing I couldn't do again.

I also had the idea to cut the end links themselves in half and weld in a threaded rod and then have a long captured nut that could thread onto both pieces.

I worry with using that method the nut could potentially back itself off over time.

I also thought about having a collar that slips on and is held in place with pins. Kind of like this:



However lining up the link becomes the problem then. I would need to compress and decompress the suspension some to make it work.
 

·
Brucey
'17 3.6
Joined
·
11,412 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I don't see your design being something used on a daily driver. Unless its like some Jeeps and trucks, all it really is is a "wheeler". Guys like that will put up with that type of NVH.

I see this a solution for someone who is going wheeling on the weekend. The disconnects go in for the weekend and the bolts go back in for DD.
If I can't get the click gone entirely I like your "install for weekend trips" idea.

I would think one would need to drive the bolt, punch and a hammer. Unless you can get parked with no load on the bar. But I would like it would be difficult, just not something done with frozen fingers by hand.

I like it alot.
I must have lucked out with how the suspension was setting with how the car sat in the garage. I specifically did this without putting it on ramps or using a jack as I didn't want to bother with that much effort and it would be silly to have to drag all those tools to the trail (although you carry them so I could just use yours :wink2:)
 

·
Registered
2008 Outback H6
Joined
·
79 Posts
If I can't get the click gone entirely I like your "install for weekend trips" idea.



I must have lucked out with how the suspension was setting with how the car sat in the garage. I specifically did this without putting it on ramps or using a jack as I didn't want to bother with that much effort and it would be silly to have to drag all those tools to the trail (although you carry them so I could just use yours :wink2:)
any updates a year on out? I'm looking to do something similar for a quick release, but the car is mostly on road. I don't want an annoying click.
 

·
Brucey
'17 3.6
Joined
·
11,412 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
any updates a year on out? I'm looking to do something similar for a quick release, but the car is mostly on road. I don't want an annoying click.
I pretty much never used it.

When I remove the end link it's easy to just unbolt it. I can do it with the car sitting on the ground in five minutes.

The front is easier because of the turnbuckle style end link from rallitek. I just turn the wheel.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top