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2018 Outaback 2.5i Limited with eyesight.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Back in December our 2018 Outback hit some ice and went off the road. We went over some large boulders and the front end hit a tree before the car came to a stop. There ended up being $6400.00 in damages to the car and we just finally got the car back a few days ago. All parts damaged were replaced with genuine Subaru parts. There was only about a weeks worth of actual work but the parts took forever to come in. Good thing is that you can't even tell the car was in an accident.

No one was hurt but it was miserable being without the car for so long. Consider this a public service announcement and don't wreck your brand new model year car. :smile2:
 

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2016 Outback 3.6R Limited
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175 Posts
Back in December our 2018 Outback hit some ice and went off the road. We went over some large boulders and the front end hit a tree before the car came to a stop. There ended up being $6400.00 in damages to the car and we just finally got the car back a few days ago. All parts damaged were replaced with genuine Subaru parts. There was only about a weeks worth of actual work but the parts took forever to come in. Good thing is that you can't even tell the car was in an accident.

No one was hurt but it was miserable being without the car for so long. Consider this a public service announcement and don't wreck your brand new model year car. :smile2:
Glad you made it through the accident without too much issue.

Stay safe.

Cheers!
 

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2018 Outaback 2.5i Limited with eyesight.
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90 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
"Back in December our 2018 Outback hit some ice"... translates to "I was speeding on icy roads, then I over corrected and went off the road".

Funny how it's the car that did it. :)

I normally wouldn't waste my time responding to this but what you infer is wrong. It took a long time to get parts because the car is new so unless you would like to be without a vehicle for a prolonged period of time you better drive it like a baby. Hence my post.

Since you've made some assumptions on the accident itself I'll clarify the chain of events in case anyone is interested.

I live in a house that sits on a hill with a road that is steep and unpaved (2 tenths of a mile long). As I was driving down the hill as slow as I possibly could by gently riding the brakes with the car and its lowest gear the car continued to gain speed due to gravity and the fact that the tires were slipping on the ice. The intermittent bare spots were far and few between so there was no opportunity to slow the car down enough to make a difference before hitting the next stretch of ice. By the time I reached the bottom of the hill and where the road starts to level off the car was sliding so fast that there was no stopping it before the road ended. There was no way I could make the left turn off my road so in the woods it went.

It wasn't the cars fault it was my fault for attempting to go down my road given the conditions that day. To imply I was speeding without knowing the facts is ridiculous and not all accidents can be avoided. The car now has studded tires like my truck so I have at least mitigated the risk of repeating the same mistake. My living environment is what drew me to a Subaru, but as everyone who has driven in icy conditions knows AWD won't save you from sliding down a hill covered in ice. Those are the facts.

Drive safe.

The good news is that once Subaru gets further into the model year and parts should be easier to come by but for now parts are hard to get.
 

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Ad hoc winter sled ride...

GregS - glad you were OK.

Your description of the incident, read like an unwanted winter sled ride on ice... Hill, gravity, and ice --- not a good combo.

In passing, I've often looked at steep driveways and thought - man that would be a bad situation in ice/snow... again glad you were OK.

... As I was driving down the hill as slow as I possibly could by gently riding the brakes with the car and its lowest gear the car continued to gain speed due to gravity and the fact that the tires were slipping on the ice. The intermittent bare spots were far and few between so there was no opportunity to slow the car down enough to make a difference before hitting the next stretch of ice. By the time I reached the bottom of the hill and where the road starts to level off the car was sliding so fast that there was no stopping it before the road ended. There was no way I could make the left turn off my road so in the woods it went...
 

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'15 Outback 2.5i Premium
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Try xmode. It is supposed to help with speed downhill.
From the description of the incident, I doubt it would have helped here.

If there's not enough friction between wheels and road to resist gravity, you're gonna' move downhill. Period.

Solution: increase the coefficient of friction (studs, chains, perhaps tires), or avoid the situation.
 

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2018 Outaback 2.5i Limited with eyesight.
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90 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
From the description of the incident, I doubt it would have helped here.

If there's not enough friction between wheels and road to resist gravity, you're gonna' move downhill. Period.

Solution: increase the coefficient of friction (studs, chains, perhaps tires), or avoid the situation.

I probably should have had it in X Mode but didn't think of it before I started out of my drive way. I think the studded tires are my best option given my road (it is very icy right now and so far so good with the new tires). There was literally zero traction the day of the accident and I started out at a crawl. Gravity and ice were just too much for the car and tires to handle.
 

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I normally wouldn't waste my time responding to this but what you infer is wrong. It took a long time to get parts because the car is new so unless you would like to be without a vehicle for a prolonged period of time you better drive it like a baby. Hence my post.

Since you've made some assumptions on the accident itself I'll clarify the chain of events in case anyone is interested.

I live in a house that sits on a hill with a road that is steep and unpaved (2 tenths of a mile long). As I was driving down the hill as slow as I possibly could by gently riding the brakes with the car and its lowest gear the car continued to gain speed due to gravity and the fact that the tires were slipping on the ice. The intermittent bare spots were far and few between so there was no opportunity to slow the car down enough to make a difference before hitting the next stretch of ice. By the time I reached the bottom of the hill and where the road starts to level off the car was sliding so fast that there was no stopping it before the road ended. There was no way I could make the left turn off my road so in the woods it went.

It wasn't the cars fault it was my fault for attempting to go down my road given the conditions that day. To imply I was speeding without knowing the facts is ridiculous and not all accidents can be avoided. The car now has studded tires like my truck so I have at least mitigated the risk of repeating the same mistake. My living environment is what drew me to a Subaru, but as everyone who has driven in icy conditions knows AWD won't save you from sliding down a hill covered in ice. Those are the facts.

Drive safe.

The good news is that once Subaru gets further into the model year and parts should be easier to come by but for now parts are hard to get.
Glad you're OK.

This is the most cogent explanation on why AWD (even Subaru) needs winter tires that bite into the ice.

As you all know, with the foot on the brake and gravity pulling you along on the ice, AWD is of NO value. The only thing that will help is a tire, stud, or chain that will bte into the ice and stop the car. All seasons tires are entirely inadequate in this and many other situations.
 

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2017 Outback 2.5i Limited
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I normally wouldn't waste my time responding to this but what you infer is wrong. It took a long time to get parts because the car is new so unless you would like to be without a vehicle for a prolonged period of time you better drive it like a baby. Hence my post.

Since you've made some assumptions on the accident itself I'll clarify the chain of events in case anyone is interested.

I live in a house that sits on a hill with a road that is steep and unpaved (2 tenths of a mile long). As I was driving down the hill as slow as I possibly could by gently riding the brakes with the car and its lowest gear the car continued to gain speed due to gravity and the fact that the tires were slipping on the ice. The intermittent bare spots were far and few between so there was no opportunity to slow the car down enough to make a difference before hitting the next stretch of ice. By the time I reached the bottom of the hill and where the road starts to level off the car was sliding so fast that there was no stopping it before the road ended. There was no way I could make the left turn off my road so in the woods it went.

It wasn't the cars fault it was my fault for attempting to go down my road given the conditions that day. To imply I was speeding without knowing the facts is ridiculous and not all accidents can be avoided. The car now has studded tires like my truck so I have at least mitigated the risk of repeating the same mistake. My living environment is what drew me to a Subaru, but as everyone who has driven in icy conditions knows AWD won't save you from sliding down a hill covered in ice. Those are the facts.

Drive safe.

The good news is that once Subaru gets further into the model year and parts should be easier to come by but for now parts are hard to get.
My apologies for the incorrect inference, and thanks for filling in the details. Anyone who frequents car forums reads it a lot. Someone blames the car for their own ability to drive their vehicle.
 

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Outbrat XT, 3.0R Limited, 2.5i Touring
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I normally wouldn't waste my time responding to this but what you infer is wrong. It took a long time to get parts because the car is new so unless you would like to be without a vehicle for a prolonged period of time you better drive it like a baby. Hence my post.

Since you've made some assumptions on the accident itself I'll clarify the chain of events in case anyone is interested.

I live in a house that sits on a hill with a road that is steep and unpaved (2 tenths of a mile long). As I was driving down the hill as slow as I possibly could by gently riding the brakes with the car and its lowest gear the car continued to gain speed due to gravity and the fact that the tires were slipping on the ice. The intermittent bare spots were far and few between so there was no opportunity to slow the car down enough to make a difference before hitting the next stretch of ice. By the time I reached the bottom of the hill and where the road starts to level off the car was sliding so fast that there was no stopping it before the road ended. There was no way I could make the left turn off my road so in the woods it went.

It wasn't the cars fault it was my fault for attempting to go down my road given the conditions that day. To imply I was speeding without knowing the facts is ridiculous and not all accidents can be avoided. The car now has studded tires like my truck so I have at least mitigated the risk of repeating the same mistake. My living environment is what drew me to a Subaru, but as everyone who has driven in icy conditions knows AWD won't save you from sliding down a hill covered in ice. Those are the facts.

Drive safe.

The good news is that once Subaru gets further into the model year and parts should be easier to come by but for now parts are hard to get.
What kind of snow tires do you use in the winter?

I didn't have rental coverage but I do now. Luckily we had an extra vehicle.
Lesson learned.
 

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2016 Outback
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You got your car back fast compared to others and you weren't hurt.
Nothing stops on ice.
The heavier it is the longer it takes to stop, especially on ice!
I wouldn't complain...
 

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2018 OB Limited 3.6R
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202 Posts
Good to know about the timeframe. I recently hit a sofa in the highway. Yes you read that right, a sofa.

It was the middle of the night, on a highway with no lights across bridge over a lake traveling just shy of 65. 18 wheeler to my left, tailgating SUV behind, narrow shoulder and concrete barrier on my right. Suddenly a sofa came into view sitting halfway into the lane and into the shoulder. All I could do was brake as much as possible without getting rear ended and come about a half mirror width away from the 18 wheeler to avoid a full frontal collision. We were fortunate. The 18 wheeler had just blown into our lane due to high winds moments before. The driver over corrected back into their own lane giving us just a little extra room for the attempted avoidance maneuver.

We probably hit it at about 45 mph. Front end is a bit damaged but driveable. Airbags did not deploy and eyesight never made a peep. Estimate for the car at this moment is about $3500. We were fine. I figured the sofa was toast but it had nary a scratch. Where was that sofa when I had young children in the house?
 

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2014 3.6R Limited
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Onna the funniest things I ever saw driving involved a sofa! It was in broad daylight too! We were following our friends down the interstate and that sucker hit a sofa! Did he just knock it outta the way? No!!!! His car jumped up on it and he was dragging that sucker down the road with the drivers side front wheel up on the sofa! :grin2: I wish I had a camera at the time. We eased up next to them and the older man's Eyes that was riding with him were bigger than silver dollars! If he looked out the window straight out he was looking at pavement. I think he drug that couch over a mile before it finally gave up and fell apart. Amazingly it really didn't do much to his car. After that happened all you had to do was say anything about that sofa and they were fighting words! To this day I still can't see how he hit that sofa! There was no one else around and we were on flat level ground. Needless to say laughing to the point of tears rolling outta my eyes happened many times after! >:)

Good to know about the timeframe. I recently hit a sofa in the highway. Yes you read that right, a sofa.

It was the middle of the night, on a highway with no lights across bridge over a lake traveling just shy of 65. 18 wheeler to my left, tailgating SUV behind, narrow shoulder and concrete barrier on my right. Suddenly a sofa came into view sitting halfway into the lane and into the shoulder. All I could do was brake as much as possible without getting rear ended and come about a half mirror width away from the 18 wheeler to avoid a full frontal collision. We were fortunate. The 18 wheeler had just blown into our lane due to high winds moments before. The driver over corrected back into their own lane giving us just a little extra room for the attempted avoidance maneuver.

We probably hit it at about 45 mph. Front end is a bit damaged but driveable. Airbags did not deploy and eyesight never made a peep. Estimate for the car at this moment is about $3500. We were fine. I figured the sofa was toast but it had nary a scratch. Where was that sofa when I had young children in the house?
 
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