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06 3.0R JDM facelift SI Drive-shift paddles. 87 Brumby EA81 (Brat) 4MT D/R
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Re built the u joints on my Brumby (Brat) driveshaft - it was a while ago so don't remember what kits I used.
More preferable / better than buying a 2nd hand drive shaft and joints being close to worn out as well.
Agree there are enough youtube videos on DIY plus dealing with staked in Joints as well.

If the kits are the correct size the joints are centred / located by the circlips inside the yokes into the grooves of each of the cups and should be a perfect fit without any side play
 

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2001 Outback 5 speed, 2000 Outback Automatic, 2002 Legacy Wagon Automatic. All 2.5L
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Harbor Freight has a 20 ton press for $139 with a coupon. I have 2 outbacks, my daughter has one (it used to be mine). At that price the press pays for itself on the next u joint replacement. :29:
 

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06 3.0R JDM facelift SI Drive-shift paddles. 87 Brumby EA81 (Brat) 4MT D/R
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Harbor Freight has a 20 ton press for $139 with a coupon. I have 2 outbacks, my daughter has one (it used to be mine). At that price the press pays for itself on the next u joint replacement. :29:
I used a hammer and the right sized socket to tap out / tap in cups, holding yokes carefully /correctly in a bench vice as per you tube demonstrations.

This method can be used to break out staked joints also as per relevant youtube demonstrations as well
 

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06 OBW 2.5, 05 Forester, had 03 H6 OBW
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I have the HF 20-ton A-frame press. Have used it on a number of wheel bearings. I think every wheel bearing pretty much maxxed it out (rusty NY), with me hanging on the extended pump rod.
 

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I have the HF 20-ton A-frame press. Have used it on a number of wheel bearings. I think every wheel bearing pretty much maxxed it out (rusty NY), with me hanging on the extended pump rod.
The A frame press from the Freight is 6 Ton. They have a 12 ton and 20 ton H Frame press.

I have the 12 Ton and it has not let me down thus far.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I've had the HF 12-ton H-frame for over 10 years now. I love it. I've done many many wheel bearings and suspension bushings on it.
 

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06 OBW 2.5, 05 Forester, had 03 H6 OBW
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Discussion Starter #28
My junkyard shaft is now greasable.


2018-01-30_10-11-44 by Numbchux, on Flickr

Those caps are definitely hardened. 3 holes and my drill and tap are noticeably worn.

I used this carbide-tipped drill bit: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00462RS2Q/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

A hardware-store 1/4 - 28 tap. And a package of grease fittings. I drilled and tapped the hole, retrieved as much as I could with a magnet, then flipped it upside-down and rinsed the joint out with brake clean. Then threaded the fitting in and pushed grease in until it came out clean from under the caps. The joints move much more freely now.


I'll toss it in the car this week sometime.
 
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My junkyard shaft is now greasable.


2018-01-30_10-11-44 by Numbchux, on Flickr

Those caps are definitely hardened. 3 holes and my drill and tap are noticeably worn.

I used this carbide-tipped drill bit: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00462RS2Q/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

A hardware-store 1/4 - 28 tap. And a package of grease fittings. I drilled and tapped the hole, retrieved as much as I could with a magnet, then flipped it upside-down and rinsed the joint out with brake clean. Then threaded the fitting in and pushed grease in until it came out clean from under the caps. The joints move much more freely now.


I'll toss it in the car this week sometime.
Chux didn't know you were on the forum. Glad to see someone local has done this. Then when I have questions when I do mine in my Gen3 wagon eventually I will have a source to ask away with.
 

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01 Outback LL Bean
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My junkyard shaft is now greasable.


Those caps are definitely hardened. 3 holes and my drill and tap are noticeably worn.

I used this carbide-tipped drill bit: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00462RS2Q/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

A hardware-store 1/4 - 28 tap. And a package of grease fittings. I drilled and tapped the hole, retrieved as much as I could with a magnet, then flipped it upside-down and rinsed the joint out with brake clean. Then threaded the fitting in and pushed grease in until it came out clean from under the caps. The joints move much more freely now.


I'll toss it in the car this week sometime.
Nice work!
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Put it in on Friday, driven probably 250 miles since then. Butter smooth.

My nasty hard downshifts are not nearly as violent, but definitely still present.
 
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numb....have you tried testing for thos hard downshifts after doing a battery disconnect reset?

if they are like what I experience, a 'flare' when downshifting at highway speeds, it's gone if I do a TCU reset before a road trip.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Oh yea, tried multiple times. Fluid changes, filter changes. Bypassed my aux cooler. This is the biggest difference I've noticed.

Raising the line pressure in FreeSSM helped keep it from downshifting, which is a decent band-aid. But still just a band-aid.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
The vibration has been present this summer again, regreasing makes it better for a short time, but increasingly shorter (the last one lasted just a couple days).

I grabbed another shaft at UPull. Happened to be out of an '01 OBK LLBean (which made me feel better about the condition of the rear subframe in my '00, that one was way worse and still un-broken).

Rear Ujoint had play in it, which I didn't like, but it's all they had. I got it home pressed the joint out, and it hadn't wrecked anything else. So I ordered a couple 'Zone joints (I had returned the ones I had last winter), they didn't have them in town, but free next day shipping so I should have them tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Alright, new ujoints, and it rides like butter. So nice. Here's how:


1. The joint before I started, you can see some of the 8 little "stakes" being deformations in the outer yoke holding the caps in.

20180827_192114 by Numbchux, on Flickr

I've seen 2 ways to do staked in joints (generally, not specifically Subaru), one is to grind the stakes out, and the other is to just use a press to push through them. In my experimenting on other shafts, it takes an enormous amount of force (easily the most I've ever done on my little 12 ton HF press), so I opted to grind first.

High speed metal cutting bit on the dremel does a pretty good work down in the corners.

20180827_192401 by Numbchux, on Flickr

While I had it out, I used the dremel to make a few light marks on the yoke and the shaft itself to ensure the orientation when it came time to reassemble.

20180827_192552 by Numbchux, on Flickr

2. Then over to the press, make sure to support the other end of the shaft pretty well.

20180827_192748 by Numbchux, on Flickr

3. Once it's pressed off to one side, the stakes become really clear (some of these are ground down, some are un-touched).

20180827_192926 by Numbchux, on Flickr

4. Flip it over and press it back all the way through to flatten those stakes. Then lay it with the opposite yokes supported (a vice works best for this), and pound on the yoke so those cups can be pushed out beyond the ears. Don't pound on the thin part at the top of the ears, and don't pound on the shaft tubing itself.

20180827_193255 by Numbchux, on Flickr

5. Flip over and repeat the other way until those cups are pushed as far out of the yoke as possible. It should get to the point where the cross of the ujoint can be removed from the yoke (if those cups are damaged, you might need to sneak a punch passed the cross to push the cup out further, just make sure not to damage the yoke).

20180827_193408 by Numbchux, on Flickr

6. Then pound the cups out the rest of the way:

20180827_193515 by Numbchux, on Flickr

Rotate the shaft 90*, and repeat steps 1-6 to remove the other 2 caps, and remove the joint completely.

7. Now switch to a softer dremel bit (wire wheel or sanding drum work well) to clean up the inside of the yoke, you want to smooth everything out without taking off really any material. You'll also want to run a flat file across the inner surface of those ears, as the new joints will be held in place by snaprings against this surface.

20180827_195537 by Numbchux, on Flickr

8. Now to start preparing the new joint. The four cups need to be removed from the center cross, inside those cups are needle bearings which have to stay in place, and the only thing holding them there is grease. They *should* be pregreased with assembly lube for this purpose, but I don't trust it, so I hold the caps in place by hand and gently pump some fresh grease through them:

20180827_194557 by Numbchux, on Flickr

9. Then pull the caps off. You'll notice I removed the grease zerk from the one cap to protect it from damage, this is optional, but IMHO a good idea.

20180827_194833 by Numbchux, on Flickr

10. Put the cross in the middle of the yoke, and one of the caps in from the outside. You want to hold the cross inside the cap as tight as possible as you press on it to help keep those needle bearings in place.

20180827_194903 by Numbchux, on Flickr

11. Then press it in well past it's final resting place. This simplifies putting on that snapring, and aligning the opposing cup.

20180827_201328 by Numbchux, on Flickr

12. Put the snapring on the one cup, then put the opposite cup from the other side, and again slide the cross into the new cup as you press it in. This is a bit tricky, as you have to get it pressed in far enough to get the second snapring on, but you don't want to put too much pressure on the bearings to damage them (although, the cross should bottom out in the cups before the needle bearings bear the brunt of the weight)

Back to step 10 to finish the other half of the joint, taking care to reassemble in the same orientation that you started with.

Install the grease zerk (if you removed it), and grease.

20180827_203215 by Numbchux, on Flickr

Now flip the shaft and do it all again at the other end.

Install in the car, and enjoy!
 
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05 manual XTL stage 2 with post facelift JDM front end
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Numbchux,

thank you very much for the walk-through. I am following all of your steps. I have succesfully removed the front ujoint. Am halfway there for the rear one. Can't wait to be done and do a test drive.
How is it holding up?

btw, am doing this on a 120K 2005 OBXT.
 

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2001 Outback H6 3.0l VDC
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Nice, this thread will come in handy when I inevitably have to do mine. Just wanted to ask though, you said you made adjustments to your tcu through freessm? And your car is a '00? I've got an '01 and for some reason freessm won't connect to my tcu, just the ecu.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Still holding up great in both cars. I regreased the '04 shaft a couple weeks ago, it's got a touch of a vibration, but I'm not convinced it has anything to do with the shaft.

The shaft that I added zerks to the factory joints is in my '01 VDC that I just bought. I'll either put new joints in it, or get a junkyard shaft to work on, before I put it back on the road.


Nice, this thread will come in handy when I inevitably have to do mine. Just wanted to ask though, you said you made adjustments to your tcu through freessm? And your car is a '00? I've got an '01 and for some reason freessm won't connect to my tcu, just the ecu.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I did that on my '04. I seem to have lost the cable since then, so I haven't tried it on my '00 or '01.
 
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