Subaru Outback Forums banner

1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I bought this car on Monday and left it at the dealership and brought the car home today, coming from Honda Accord I4, this car really feels sluggish and tight in the steering and acceleration. ALso would like to know what are the pre-cautions I need to take for first few thousand miles.
 

·
Registered
2007 Chrysler 300C built 5.7
Joined
·
396 Posts
Are those not things that should crop up in a test drive?? This isn't a CTS-V wagon or Magnum SRT8.

The good book says to not go over 4000rpm for the first thousand miles. I had my first oil service done around 2500 miles.
 

·
Registered
2017 Outback, 14 Jeep Grand Cherokee, 07 BMW E-93
Joined
·
604 Posts
Also help us help you tell us what OB you have, which engine, which options.
I agree that the test drive or drives should have been long enough to allow you to get a feel for what is to come...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
2.5i CVT premium. I test drove it in the city. Not sure if its about getting used to the higher ride and new car and the CVT.
 

·
Registered
2012 Outback prem, CVT - graphite gray
Joined
·
6 Posts
Having just got one myself, I think you'll find the cvt takes a little getting used to. It felt like a traditional automatic with a high stall converter at first. Also with any new car there seems to be a "driver break in period", you are hyper sensitive to all the little nuances even if it's just because your old car was worn out.

Careful not to change out the factory oil too soon, it usually has special additives in it.



This isn't a CTS-V wagon or Magnum SRT8.
Because those cars perform exactly like the 4 cyl Accord he was comparing it to. ???
 

·
Registered
2019 2.5i Outback Limited, CVT, Nav, Eyesight and the rest of the safety stuff.
Joined
·
171 Posts
The CVT does take some getting used to if you haven't driven one before. A whole different feel from the "normal" automatics.
 

·
Premium Member
2005 3.0 R n totaled
Joined
·
7,529 Posts
Comparing to Honda (Civic or Accord with miles on them) it will feel sluggish! You will get used to it, like previously mentioned, CVT is a whole different "animal"!
 

·
Registered
2013 2.5i Premium 6mt, Twilight Blue
Joined
·
2,378 Posts
Mamamia, welcome to the forum and congratulations on your purchase.From the Accord to the Outback, you're looking at an extra 500+ lbs, an AWD system and ultimately a very different vehicle. Hopefully the OB fits your needs beyond power and acceleration as those really aren't it's primary features. Give it some time, and hopefully you'll come to enjoy it.

As far as initial break in, as Latigo said the Owner's Manual suggests staying below 4k RPM for the first 1,000 miles. Also, avoid staying at a constant RPM for a long duration (e.g., cruise control on a flat stretch of highway). Other than that, enjoy the ride :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
I bought this car on Monday and left it at the dealership and brought the car home today, coming from Honda Accord I4, this car really feels sluggish and tight in the steering and acceleration. ALso would like to know what are the pre-cautions I need to take for first few thousand miles.
I also noticed the tight steering feel when I first drove my 13. Im only at 1100 miles at this point, but it seems to have lightened up a bit. Maybe it's just the from-the-factory tight parts breaking in... or maybe I'm just getting used to it. As for the acceleration, You have to press your foot down pretty far to tell the CVT computer to kick it up a notch, otherwise it seems to stay in gas-miser mode. Also, as others have mentioned, the CVT experience is weird until you get used to it. There is a disconnect between the sound the engine is making and the acceleration that is very different from the rev-shift-rev-shift of a regular automatic trans.
 

·
Registered
'11 Outback 2.5i CVT - '06 Forester X 5MT
Joined
·
1,766 Posts
I can only second what's been said.

The CVT "feels" more sluggish because you don't get that high rev, kick down a gear feeling when you floor it. It just maintains and consistent rpm and changes the gear ratio to get you going. If you need the kick back feeling, tap it down a gear or two.

As sluggish as the car may feel, I've had a few 4 cyl cars play with me at stop lights and I've never had one pull away from me. They may have a little jump when they floor it, but the OB just pulls straight ahead.

Coming from someone who prefers a MT over and AT, I think the CVT is 10x better than any EAT I've driven. It finally does what an AT should, keeps the car moving without feeling the gears shift.

Welcome to the forum and enjoy your OB. Once you own it for a few months and use it for what it's intended, your old car will be no comparison ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
I can only second what's been said.
Coming from someone who prefers a MT over and AT, I think the CVT is 10x better than any EAT I've driven. It finally does what an AT should, keeps the car moving without feeling the gears shift.
Every time a read a review describing CVT's as "slippy" or "rubber band like" I grimmace. Keeping the engine in the optimum power band should be touted as an advantage... instead it seems like its frowned upon by reviewers. I admit to being a CVT skeptic before getting one, now I'm a believer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I feel the same way. I bought a 2013 Premium two weeks ago. My old car was a Hyundai Sonata. To me, the Outback seems huge when I am driving it--which is weird because it is not THAT big. And the gas and the break are taking some getting used to. When I take off from a stop I have to just barely barely touch the gas pedal or it will ZOOM away, yet when I am moving I have to press down pretty hard to get it to accelerate. And when I am going slow the breaks are so spongy and squishy and go down so far, that I seriously wonder if something is wrong with them. But when I am going fast they feel normal.

<O:pBut I got the Outback for the AWD and so that I have pretty of room to go camping and carry things around like my bicycle. So I am not really complaining. Just hoping I get used to it.<O:p></O:p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
So its just not me :)

Main reason I went with Outback was due to the AWD and additional space it provides for my outdoorsy needs :)

Now I know Subaru has some pretty good engineers, they have to fire the fella who decided on a 170HP engine for this cawagon. They should have gone for better HP when they re-designed the engine for Ouback 2013.
 

·
Registered
2016 Subaru Outback Limited 2.5i
Joined
·
161 Posts
So its just not me :)

Main reason I went with Outback was due to the AWD and additional space it provides for my outdoorsy needs :)

Now I know Subaru has some pretty good engineers, they have to fire the fella who decided on a 170HP engine for this cawagon. They should have gone for better HP when they re-designed the engine for Ouback 2013.
It seems you are not use to the CVT, give it some time. The power is adequate. But the CVT can make the engine seem weak under hard to moderate acceleration. But if you watch the speedometer it actualy accelerates pretty well, especialy from 45 to 60 mph. Now 0-60 may be at the different story, but that does not matter to me, in real world driving condtions it very rarely comes up.
 

·
Registered
2012 Outback, 3.6R Limited
Joined
·
80 Posts
So its just not me :)

Main reason I went with Outback was due to the AWD and additional space it provides for my outdoorsy needs :)

Now I know Subaru has some pretty good engineers, they have to fire the fella who decided on a 170HP engine for this cawagon. They should have gone for better HP when they re-designed the engine for Ouback 2013.
They've already done this, it's called the 3.6R
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
So its just not me :)

Now I know Subaru has some pretty good engineers, they have to fire the fella who decided on a 170HP engine for this cawagon. They should have gone for better HP when they re-designed the engine for Ouback 2013.
Yeah... I've been waiting for the H12 Outback for years. I've seen the Outback H6 get toasted every time by Audi S6's and Jaguar XKRs. Subaru better get better acquainted with their drivers expectations or they are doomed. :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I meant increasing the power of 2.5 Engine not providing 3.6 as an alternative. Toyota, Honda, Nissan are doing an excellent job in engine technology and still offering good MPG requirements.

Sorry I'm not in a fanboy mode to defend Subaru here, I made the decision to buy it based on AWD and space, the interior is excellent,featured offered in base model are next to none. But Powertrain certainly needs a shakeup.

BTW can anyone chime in on how a comparable Legacy does, since it shares the same powertrain and loses all that additional weight which comes with the wagon.

I don't floor the gas pedal, coasting and going easy on the gas is my style of driving so don't expect the OB to compare with high dollar, high power vehicle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
374 Posts
Toyota, Honda, Nissan are doing an excellent job in engine technology and still offering good MPG requirements.
Hope you do realize AWD affects MPG. Unlike Subaru, Toyota and Honda offers only on-demand AWD/4WD. So, under normal driving conditions they pretty much behave like FWD cars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
I meant increasing the power of 2.5 Engine not providing 3.6 as an alternative. Toyota, Honda, Nissan are doing an excellent job in engine technology and still offering good MPG requirements.

Sorry I'm not in a fanboy mode to defend Subaru here, I made the decision to buy it based on AWD and space, the interior is excellent,featured offered in base model are next to none. But Powertrain certainly needs a shakeup.

BTW can anyone chime in on how a comparable Legacy does, since it shares the same powertrain and loses all that additional weight which comes with the wagon.

I don't floor the gas pedal, coasting and going easy on the gas is my style of driving so don't expect the OB to compare with high dollar, high power vehicle.
I'm sure Subaru will be adding direct injection at some point. Subaru probably has a fraction of the R&D budget of Honda/Toyota/Nissan. They probably have lots of plans for the FB25 engine platform... but they can't afford to make mistakes.

Mazda's 2.0L in the CX5 puts out 155 horses on regular gas, but uses a 13-1 compression ratio and direct injection to do it... it took them 10 years of research to do it... How Mazda's Skyactiv Fuel-Efficiency Technology Works | Vehicles & Technology content from WardsAuto. I think I read that their 2.5L Skyactive will be somewhere north of 185hp.

Legacy 2.5i CVT Curb Weight = 3392lbs Outback 2.5i CVT Curb Weight = 3459.
 

·
Registered
2012 Outback 2.5 Premium - Former: Golf TDI
Joined
·
454 Posts
Hope you do realize AWD affects MPG. Unlike Subaru, Toyota and Honda offers only on-demand AWD/4WD. So, under normal driving conditions they pretty much behave like FWD cars.
You mean exactly like the OB's with CVT's electronic clutch pack leaves 80% of the power to the front wheels unless more is needed in the rear (giggidy)? :D

In all seriousness, I've yet to see many similar AWD vehicles get much better than the OB will according to fuelly, not just window stickers. It doesn't seem that a consistent 30+ mpg is likely in a RUG-fuelled, AWD vehicle despite some automaker claims (look no further than the 2012+ Impreza's)
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top