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2019 3.6 Touring & 2018 H6 Limited. Previously also owned a number of Outbacks.
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187 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know the effect of adding weight to the left rear and/or right rear of the vehicle... how it changes the camber and toe on left rear & right rear?

The reason I ask is because currently it seems that the right rear camber is more negative than the left rear with a difference of ~-1.00 but the right rear has more positive toe (to offset). I have yet to add a camber bolt since the ride okay. I just don't want the difference to be worse when weight is added...

btw, also consider there is only the driver with no front passenger with the weight of passengers equally distributed in the rear.

Thanks in advance,
 

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2013 BRZ 2005 OBXT
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231 Posts
Load has a huge impact on the alignment of a vehicle (Especially the gen3 like I have)

What I did to get a favorable driving experience in my wagon is 0 the Toe with 150-200lbs in the back of the car. Then even empty the car drives well.
 

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Lawn ornament XT
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14,368 Posts
When you put a car on an alignment rack, you're generally supposed to verify that there isn't any cargo or other extra weight in the car.

As you add weight to a car, the resting position of the suspension will change. The angles will change at different points in the normal range of motion, at least for many common suspension designs.

So if you want to do it by the book, you make sure the car is empty.

Over the years, owners have learned that the 3rd generation Outback gains toe and handles poorly when the rear suspension is compressed with load- the change in toe has a large impact and it isn't good. I don't know if the same is true for your 4th generation model, but the suspension sure looks similar to me.

There isn't an easy way for owners to change the alignment specifications published in the databases, so the answer is to pre-load the trunk with 200lbs and tell the alignment tech to do it anyway. The numbers wind up looking wrong once the weight comes out, but an error in that direction doesn't harm the handling anywhere near as much.

This isn't the first time it has happened- they are used to using that trick on certain other cars too.
 

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2010 2.5 CVT Limited
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1,521 Posts
Speaking generically, most suspensions tend to increase negative camber when compressed. Some are better at maintaining neutral and some are worse.

As for toe, generally the preference is for the rear tires to toe-in when the suspension is extended. This enhances braking stability. I'm unsure if this is how the OB suspension behaves, but I would be surprised if it was otherwise. This also means when the suspension is compressed, the toe goes out.

I'm not sure I understand how toe on one side can be used to offset camber on the other side.
 

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2012 OB , 2017 Impreza
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3,348 Posts
Does anyone know the effect of adding weight to the left rear and/or right rear of the vehicle... how it changes the camber and toe on left rear & right rear?

The reason I ask is because currently it seems that the right rear camber is more negative than the left rear with a difference of ~-1.00 but the right rear has more positive toe (to offset). I have yet to add a camber bolt since the ride okay. I just don't want the difference to be worse when weight is added...

btw, also consider there is only the driver with no front passenger with the weight of passengers equally distributed in the rear.

Thanks in advance,
Most alignment procedures SPECIFICALLY say to place a load (sandbag...etc) in the drivers seat before proceeding....I wonder how many shops actually follow this procedure?
 

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OBW H6 VDC, Tribeca, XT6
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12,390 Posts
why not just get an alignment like the millions of other people that never have issues no matter the driver or weight, etc?

unless you're tracking and aggressively driving...then your question and answers may differ.
 
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