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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As an almost new owner - we bought a new 2021 Outback Premium in June (2021) then canceled the deal before we took delivery because it needed a new computer, wiring harness, fuel pump, fuel rods, and other pieces and wouldn't be delivered until after the middle of July due to parts shortage (covid-19).

I read the owners manual on "Eyesight" and the limitations which can affect its performance with no indication of what change in behavior we might encounter.

After reading the owners manuals I realized I wasn't buying a car with a computer I was buying a computer mounted on 4 wheels. As a retired (11 years ago) computer systems engineer I was very worried about a computer driving the car. What happens if it "decides" it doesn't like what the the human operator is doing?? Time to go back to Toyota that I had been owning since 1973..

Though the Outback NOT the Rav4 or Highlander meet our needs. More research I realized all new manufactured cars have "a partially autonomous safety system". And each manufacture has their own idea of what type of system they use. So we still are going to buy an Outback (Limited this time) and learn how Eye Sight operates. It should get better with each new generation and the new cars should have less problems than the 2012 models.

While we wait for the 2022's we want to get up to speed on the idiosyncrasies of Eye Sight. Thanks for whatever info you can offer.
 

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2020 Outback Premier 2.5i
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I have no issues with mine. However, I don't use either of the lane centering functions because
a) many city streets I drive on don't have regular lane border markings so it turns itself off anyway, and
b) I don't like the steering wheel trying to shift the car around while I'm controlling it.
It seems to favour one side too much for my liking so these have been turned off for months. I wouldn't worry about the systems 'not working' as much as I'd worry about those which might run amok. In the case of OB's the default seems to be to turn off rather than make decisions.

If you watch any vids where they test various cars for frontal collision avoidance by braking, you'll see that the Eyesight system outperforms many other makes. Anything that helps me to avoid an accident is important to me (e.g. rear cross traffic alert, automatic braking in reverse, side proximity warnings, etc.).
 

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2021 OBXT
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I think the issue with Eye-sight is that it's based on the idea that average driver is not very alert or paying attention to what they're doing. This is my first automatic car and it's so easy to drive, I can see how that may make sense.

However my experience has been really poor, to the point where I feel like the frontal collision avoidance is dangerous. I've had two scenarios repeat themselves over and over again:

1. There is no danger and the system triggers, this can happen you're going around a curved road and the system pics up some object that's not actually in your path (a road divider, a parked car, a large sign)

2. There is an issue, I'm aware of it and then a couple of lights flash on my dashboard, causing me to take my eyes off the road at a critical time

3. There is an issue and the system is totally unaware and doesn't respond. When there's a car pulling out or across traffic suddenly and without enough room, the system seems totally unaware

All in all I find the system either annoying, dangerous or useless and I wish there was a permanent turn off
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Micron and Chad.
Micron I like that the default setting to turn off rather than make decisions.

Chad, A "work-around" for driving in the mountains might be using the Car-wash setting and just turn it off when I know I'm going through mountains. I don't like surprises either. Read about that in the manual somewhere. I'm working on instructions for my wife with scenario's and work-arounds.

One analogue work-around for turning off the system is to tape a card over the cameras. I read about that on this forum. System boots up, doesn't see anything and shuts down. Will try that when I have a "car to play with".
 

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2021 Touring XT Abyss Blue Pearl
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I think the issue with Eye-sight is that it's based on the idea that average driver is not very alert or paying attention to what they're doing. This is my first automatic car and it's so easy to drive, I can see how that may make sense.

However my experience has been really poor, to the point where I feel like the frontal collision avoidance is dangerous. I've had two scenarios repeat themselves over and over again:

1. There is no danger and the system triggers, this can happen you're going around a curved road and the system pics up some object that's not actually in your path (a road divider, a parked car, a large sign)

2. There is an issue, I'm aware of it and then a couple of lights flash on my dashboard, causing me to take my eyes off the road at a critical time

3. There is an issue and the system is totally unaware and doesn't respond. When there's a car pulling out or across traffic suddenly and without enough room, the system seems totally unaware

All in all I find the system either annoying, dangerous or useless and I wish there was a permanent turn off
I have to counter your reluctance with the anecdote of the car saving us from rear-ending another car in Portland. I would not use cruise and lane keep around a sharp curve though. I was testing today and it nearly wrecked the car, ran over the double yellow line then veered toward the ditch on the inside sharply. On the open road it works great to follow traffic at X car lengths behind. I love the way the car can autonomously follow the car ahead in a traffic jam with near zero driver input. If you sit for less than 4 or 5 seconds the car will start and follow till stops again on it's own. If more than 4 or 5 seconds a 'hold' lights up on the display and you have to hit RES for the car to move.
I really like the way it makes a long trip less fatiguing, we just were 4259 miles out to the coast and back.
 

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2020 Onyx
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I think in 2023 the next generation "Eyesight X" will be coming to the Outback (speculation). It's already in the Levorg in Japan.


One member had a broken windshield and after that, the glass installer did both a static calibration with test patterns as well as a dynamic on-road calibration and after that the eyesight worked better than new.

If your Eyesight is behaving strangely I'd ask Subaru to re-calibrate it under warranty.

Having said that, there are some characteristics of Eyesight Automatic Emergency Braking on my car, which I think Eyesight is working fine (has not been re-calibrated).
  • If you are behind someone who is taking a right turn and you're going straight, if that person slows down to take the turn Eyesight doesn't assume the person will take the turn and will alert and potentially emergency brake, especially if you are accelerating. While 99.999% of the time someone turning will complete the turn, there are rare instances where the person has to stop unexpectedly or will decide not to turn after all and veer back onto the road.
  • If there are cones or other cars or other objects in front of a very sharp turn, if you accelerate towards the turn AEB could turn on, not realizing you're going to turn. Again it assumes that you might not make the turn.
Those are the only two false positive situations I have encountered on my car. Some people have reported that a certain twisty road, possibly with elevation changes, that AEB routinely false positives, so if you have roads like that in your area they would be a great test-drive location.

If you do use lane-keep assist or lane centering (I do not) and you gently try to guide the steering wheel left or right of where the car thinks it should be, the car will try to resist you and if you let go of the wheel it may veer (overcorrect) out of your lane. So if you need to correct these autonomous steering features you must do so positively not gently until you can turn it off.
 

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2022 Outback Touring XT
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I think in 2023 the next generation "Eyesight X" will be coming to the Outback (speculation). It's already in the Levorg in Japan.


One member had a broken windshield and after that, the glass installer did both a static calibration with test patterns as well as a dynamic on-road calibration and after that the eyesight worked better than new.

If your Eyesight is behaving strangely I'd ask Subaru to re-calibrate it under warranty.

Having said that, there are some characteristics of Eyesight Automatic Emergency Braking on my car, which I think Eyesight is working fine (has not been re-calibrated).
  • If you are behind someone who is taking a right turn and you're going straight, if that person slows down to take the turn Eyesight doesn't assume the person will take the turn and will alert and potentially emergency brake, especially if you are accelerating. While 99.999% of the time someone turning will complete the turn, there are rare instances where the person has to stop unexpectedly or will decide not to turn after all and veer back onto the road.
  • If there are cones or other cars or other objects in front of a very sharp turn, if you accelerate towards the turn AEB could turn on, not realizing you're going to turn. Again it assumes that you might not make the turn.
Those are the only two false positive situations I have encountered on my car. Some people have reported that a certain twisty road, possibly with elevation changes, that AEB routinely false positives, so if you have roads like that in your area they would be a great test-drive location.

If you do use lane-keep assist or lane centering (I do not) and you gently try to guide the steering wheel left or right of where the car thinks it should be, the car will try to resist you and if you let go of the wheel it may veer (overcorrect) out of your lane. So if you need to correct these autonomous steering features you must do so positively not gently until you can turn it off.
I love that, when you hold the wheel to correct the lane centering, and it says, fine f u, and would gladly over correct out of your lane into a passing car or semi, like thanks Eyesight, passive aggressive b**
 

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20 Outback Premium; former 19 Outback Premium, 85 GL Wagon, 87 GL-10 Wagon
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I leave everything on, works great, a few "tricks" I've learned from experience:
1. Loose grip on the wheel works better than trying to overpower it.
2. If 1 above doesn't feel right to you, just hit the lower right button on the steering wheel to turn off lane centering, now you're steering manually. You can turn lane centering back on by hitting the lower right button again, and more often than not it will now feel better. Similarly, if it ever feels like it's wandering, just tap it off and right back on to smooth it out.
3. In those situations where a car ahead of you is turning and your car starts to slow down because it's not sure, light pressure on the accelerator will tell the car you know what's really going to happen and it will relinquish control to you and stop the deceleration. Of course, if you really are going to rear end someone, there will be a point where the car really will try to prevent the collision by braking very abruptly as a last resort.
4. Our dealer does a new owner welcome session where they take you out back to demonstrate what Eyesight can do, things like preventing you from hitting a wall or stopped vehicle, stuff like that. Highly recommend attending one of those sessions at your dealer.
5. Ultimately it's a driving aid, like an extra set of eyes, not a replacement for the driver. If you like it, great, but you can always turn it off if you don't. I occasionally click mine off as in #2 above when passing trucks, stuff like that because sometimes I intentionally don't want to be in the center of the lane. Otherwise, though, I find the extra set of eyes a nice safety backup when driving.
 

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2021 Outback Sport 2.5i
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I leave everything on, works great, a few "tricks" I've learned from experience:
1. Loose grip on the wheel works better than trying to overpower it.
2. If 1 above doesn't feel right to you, just hit the lower right button on the steering wheel to turn off lane centering, now you're steering manually. You can turn lane centering back on by hitting the lower right button again, and more often than not it will now feel better. Similarly, if it ever feels like it's wandering, just tap it off and right back on to smooth it out.
3. In those situations where a car ahead of you is turning and your car starts to slow down because it's not sure, light pressure on the accelerator will tell the car you know what's really going to happen and it will relinquish control to you and stop the deceleration. Of course, if you really are going to rear end someone, there will be a point where the car really will try to prevent the collision by braking very abruptly as a last resort.
4. Our dealer does a new owner welcome session where they take you out back to demonstrate what Eyesight can do, things like preventing you from hitting a wall or stopped vehicle, stuff like that. Highly recommend attending one of those sessions at your dealer.
5. Ultimately it's a driving aid, like an extra set of eyes, not a replacement for the driver. If you like it, great, but you can always turn it off if you don't. I occasionally click mine off as in #2 above when passing trucks, stuff like that because sometimes I intentionally don't want to be in the center of the lane. Otherwise, though, I find the extra set of eyes a nice safety backup when driving.
This is well explained daniel and pretty much my sentiments too about the eyesight system.

There seems to be a lot who assume the A.I. is taking over like Skynet and controlling the vehicle. It's not the case completely. It is a 'driver aid' as you mentioned, not a stand alone automated system. You as the driver still need to operate the vehicle and you CAN turn off aspects of the eyesight aid system to suit your preferences.

Personally I dont like the system policing everything I do, so I will turn off lane departure warning and lane centering, but keep the lane keep assist on vibrate only (no audible beeps). This is my compromise to allowing the system to control everything else if I see fit.

As for the collision detection, I think there needs to be a software update to soften the sensitivity of that setting so it doesn't **** itself every time it sees a road marker, bush or inanimate object on a curve. I've had the Outback come to an almost abrupt halt once on a straight piece of road because it though the center road pedestrian barrier reflector was going to jump out or something! My 2018 Crosstrek rarely did this.
 

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2021 MGM Outback 2.5i Premium with Tungsten Grey seats
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4. Our dealer does a new owner welcome session where they take you out back to demonstrate what Eyesight can do, things like preventing you from hitting a wall or stopped vehicle, stuff like that. Highly recommend attending one of those sessions at your dealer
Hmm, mine didn't offer that...
 

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2021 OBXT
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I don't use the lane centering or cruise control, so I can't speak to their efficacy, but I do appreciate the fact that those features have to be actively turned on or can be turned off indefinitely. I do think the rear cross traffic radar is a good feature and I do like the blind spot alert features in the side mirrors. I'm not opposed to advanced safety features in general, I just think the eye sight collision avoidance on our models is very poorly executed. I would be satisfied with the ability to turn it off without it defaulting back to the "on" setting. I don't like the idea of disabling by covering an eye, but I've never had a positive experience with the systems activation.
 

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2021 Outback 2.5 Limited
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I leave everything on, works great, a few "tricks" I've learned from experience:
1. Loose grip on the wheel works better than trying to overpower it.
2. If 1 above doesn't feel right to you, just hit the lower right button on the steering wheel to turn off lane centering, now you're steering manually. You can turn lane centering back on by hitting the lower right button again, and more often than not it will now feel better. Similarly, if it ever feels like it's wandering, just tap it off and right back on to smooth it out.
3. In those situations where a car ahead of you is turning and your car starts to slow down because it's not sure, light pressure on the accelerator will tell the car you know what's really going to happen and it will relinquish control to you and stop the deceleration. Of course, if you really are going to rear end someone, there will be a point where the car really will try to prevent the collision by braking very abruptly as a last resort.
4. Our dealer does a new owner welcome session where they take you out back to demonstrate what Eyesight can do, things like preventing you from hitting a wall or stopped vehicle, stuff like that. Highly recommend attending one of those sessions at your dealer.
5. Ultimately it's a driving aid, like an extra set of eyes, not a replacement for the driver. If you like it, great, but you can always turn it off if you don't. I occasionally click mine off as in #2 above when passing trucks, stuff like that because sometimes I intentionally don't want to be in the center of the lane. Otherwise, though, I find the extra set of eyes a nice safety backup when driving.
I really like the ACC with LC in stop and go traffic. It does remarkable well on a marked highway. Other than touching the wheel every 15 seconds it’s does the rest. I feel less frustrated after driving in traffic.
 

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Hi there, new Outback owner here- just picked up a 2022 Touring XT a couple weeks ago. In the past I've owned a 2005 Legacy GT Limited 6MT and a 2011 WRX STI. Immediately prior to getting the Outback, I was driving a 2018 Volvo S90. I also worked for years in Subaru and Volvo dealerships.

Honestly, I'm not a fan of the Eyesight system. I do not think that Subaru's execution of this type of system is great. My Volvo had a similar system with similar functionality, but it had some differences that made it, in my opinion, far superior. Namely, the ability to turn off lane assist (and have it STAY off, not reset itself to "on" with each ignition cycle) and the ability to adjust the sensitivity of the collision avoidance system.

I owned the S90 for ~3 years. I set the system sensitivity to low and only had the system brake/alert ONCE. This occasion was an actual good reason for it to alert- someone turned right in front of me from a side street and then immediately slammed on the brakes to make a left turn. I was on the brakes at the same time the system triggered, but I'm glad it did because if I hadn't been paying attention then I would've definitely rear-ended that person.

In contrast, the Outback is driving me absolutely nuts. It has a habit of alerting and braking every time the following situation happens: I'm driving well over a safe distance behind someone (I never tailgate EVER). This person puts on their left turn signal and starts slowing to turn, there is no opposing traffic, they are in the process of turning out of my lane- their wheels are turned and they've started to move left. I'm far enough back that it is in no way necessary for me to brake, because by the time I approach where they are, they are no longer going to be in the roadway. Eyesight behaves as if they are stopped and will remain so forever, and freaks out that I'm not slowing.

Also, I hate that when there is a good reason for me to move out of my lane (ex. bicyclists in the roadway, someone walking their dog, car parked on the roadside- stuff the system can obviously see), the system still lights up and starts beeping at me because I crossed the center line. Sure Eyesight, I'll just mow down the pedestrians so I don't gasp! break the rules and cross the line.

This stuff would be a non-issue if I could just turn it all off and have it stay off, or adjust the sensitivity. In answer to the "well why did you buy it then", I would have a V90CC in my garage instead if I had $60+k lying around. Pickin's are slim if you like wagons but aren't ridiculously wealthy.
 

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the system still lights up and starts beeping at me because I crossed the center line. Sure Eyesight, I'll just mow down the pedestrians so I don't gasp! break the rules and cross the line.
Or you could signal, which prevents the issue and just might be a "rule" albeit a different one. Or, unless there is something different between my model year and yours, you could disable it completely (that is, properly). I have done so and the "lane departure is off" warning icon is ever present. I get no beeps when I cross the center line for cyclists or any other reason. I don't have to disable these things every time I start the car and suspect you don't either. Again, it is possible that things have changed in 2 years and that would be somewhat unfortunate.

When I see this sort of commentary over and over again it makes me wonder why people seem so quick to denounce these systems when they don't understand their basics of operation and/or find fault with the OEM because the parameters favour the 'safer side' of the response. Maybe you do understand, and maybe the default is now 'disable at startup' but when it comes to parameters, how can anyone complain that it is 'too safe'? If they dialed it back, there would be just as many who complain that it is not safe enough.
 

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...you could disable it completely (that is, properly).
How is this done "properly"? I researched how to shut it off and everything I've read has contained the caveat that you can turn it off but it will turn back on after an ignition cycle- so I haven't attempted to shut it off since I don't intend to bother doing that every time I start the car. If there's some way to get all of this to shut off permanently I'd be happy to learn it and admit ignorance on the topic!
 

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Hi there, new Outback owner here- just picked up a 2022 Touring XT a couple weeks ago. In the past I've owned a 2005 Legacy GT Limited 6MT and a 2011 WRX STI. Immediately prior to getting the Outback, I was driving a 2018 Volvo S90. I also worked for years in Subaru and Volvo dealerships.

Honestly, I'm not a fan of the Eyesight system. I do not think that Subaru's execution of this type of system is great. My Volvo had a similar system with similar functionality, but it had some differences that made it, in my opinion, far superior. Namely, the ability to turn off lane assist (and have it STAY off, not reset itself to "on" with each ignition cycle) and the ability to adjust the sensitivity of the collision avoidance system.

I owned the S90 for ~3 years. I set the system sensitivity to low and only had the system brake/alert ONCE. This occasion was an actual good reason for it to alert- someone turned right in front of me from a side street and then immediately slammed on the brakes to make a left turn. I was on the brakes at the same time the system triggered, but I'm glad it did because if I hadn't been paying attention then I would've definitely rear-ended that person.

In contrast, the Outback is driving me absolutely nuts. It has a habit of alerting and braking every time the following situation happens: I'm driving well over a safe distance behind someone (I never tailgate EVER). This person puts on their left turn signal and starts slowing to turn, there is no opposing traffic, they are in the process of turning out of my lane- their wheels are turned and they've started to move left. I'm far enough back that it is in no way necessary for me to brake, because by the time I approach where they are, they are no longer going to be in the roadway. Eyesight behaves as if they are stopped and will remain so forever, and freaks out that I'm not slowing.

Also, I hate that when there is a good reason for me to move out of my lane (ex. bicyclists in the roadway, someone walking their dog, car parked on the roadside- stuff the system can obviously see), the system still lights up and starts beeping at me because I crossed the center line. Sure Eyesight, I'll just mow down the pedestrians so I don't gasp! break the rules and cross the line.

This stuff would be a non-issue if I could just turn it all off and have it stay off, or adjust the sensitivity. In answer to the "well why did you buy it then", I would have a V90CC in my garage instead if I had $60+k lying around. Pickin's are slim if you like wagons but aren't ridiculously wealthy.
Good insight. I have a 21 limited and was able to turn off LKA and it stays off between ignition cycles. Agree the forward collision warning can be sensitive but only has to work the one time you need it to make it worth it.
 

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If there's some way to get all of this to shut off permanently I'd be happy to learn it and admit ignorance on the topic!
If no one with a newer model chimes in on whether or not you even can I'll take a look at my screen and see if I can figure out what I did. I have some woodworking stuff I need to take care of first.
 

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Good insight. I have a 21 limited and was able to turn off LKA and it stays off between ignition cycles. Agree the forward collision warning can be sensitive but only has to work the one time you need it to make it worth it.
Yeah I wish it didn't bother me as much as it does when it needlessly reacts, because I recognize that it's a great safety feature in theory and could end up being helpful. But I have PTSD and I'm very easily startled, so when I'm driving along in silence just minding my own business with no issues happening and then all of a sudden the thing's hitting the brakes, beeping, and flashing lights at me I feel like I'm about to have a heart attack.
 

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Update on turning stuff off- I had occasion to drive this afternoon, so I dove into the settings menu in the center display to see what would happen if I turned off the lane assist/warning and the collision avoidance. The lane feature stayed off after an ignition cycle but the collision avoidance came right back on. Better than nothing I suppose but I really wish collision would stay off (or, again, had sensitivity adjustment) as that's the more obnoxious and alarming thing.
 

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2021 Onyx XT
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As for the collision detection, I think there needs to be a software update to soften the sensitivity of that setting so it doesn't **** itself every time it sees a road marker, bush or inanimate object on a curve. I've had the Outback come to an almost abrupt halt once on a straight piece of road because it though the center road pedestrian barrier reflector was going to jump out or something! My 2018 Crosstrek rarely did this.
Agree. I've found the front collision detection a little too sensitive for my tastes, firing off when it seemed to me that there was more than enough distance and time to avoid a collision.

We had a 2019 Crosstrek which seemed to be not as sensitive. Of course, maybe it's telling me I should be slowing and braking a little sooner in those situations. I have not really had any false alerts as yet.
 
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