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Discussion Starter #1
Pleased to be able to report that our second snow of the year -which produced some seriously fat flakes- did not impact the functioning of my Outback's eyesight system. Lane departure was fully functional as was adaptive cruise on some dark side streets.
Also, the windshield wipers go high enough up on the glass to clear any snow from being in front of the cameras. Overall I'm very satisfied with the performance in inclement weather. I heard some side chatter that we could get about a foot of snow tonight, but I'll believe it when I see it.
 

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Are you serious? o.o? What about when you were stopped at a stop sign or stop light?

Hopefully you never have to test it but I'm curious how the system's emergency braking does on those same kind of road conditions. Have you used the adaptive cruise control with snow on the road? I noticed people have said that the system constantly brakes and accelerates and it annoys some people. I'm wondering how that transfer over to when the road isn't clear and the tires are slipping a bit because of the abrupt acceleration and deceleration.
 

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Are you serious? o.o? What about when you were stopped at a stop sign or stop light?

Hopefully you never have to test it but I'm curious how the system's emergency braking does on those same kind of road conditions. Have you used the adaptive cruise control with snow on the road? I noticed people have said that the system constantly brakes and accelerates and it annoys some people. I'm wondering how that transfer over to when the road isn't clear and the tires are slipping a bit because of the abrupt acceleration and deceleration.
It doesn't do that "frequent braking" much different than a commercial driver in a vehicle monitored or governed. The braking isn't that frequent as much as in places where drivers often coast ahead of the speed limit. The acceleration and braking are not abrupt but braking seems more that way when you're the driver than passenger but in my case I always get long brake life (smooth driver). The acceleration is smoother than many drivers and enough so that it probably aids fuel economy for some.
 

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Are you serious? o.o? What about when you were stopped at a stop sign or stop light?

Hopefully you never have to test it but I'm curious how the system's emergency braking does on those same kind of road conditions. Have you used the adaptive cruise control with snow on the road? I noticed people have said that the system constantly brakes and accelerates and it annoys some people. I'm wondering how that transfer over to when the road isn't clear and the tires are slipping a bit because of the abrupt acceleration and deceleration.
Don't read into the full negative, thers much more positive comments on eyesight than negative. However, yes there is truth to your comments above but let me give a real example. If you are following a POS driver on the interstate who keeps changing speed by 5mph then eyesight is going to be annoying as it will keep changing speed if its within your set cruise speed. The fix to this is to change lanes or lower your max speed so that eyesight quits trying to maintain a gap.

Adaptive cruise in snow is no different than normal cruise, depending on the conditions you shouldn't use it. Emergency breaking is just that; EMERGENCY. If the driver has failed to pay attention at the very least some breaking was applied before sliding into the car in front of them.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Are you serious? o.o? What about when you were stopped at a stop sign or stop light?

Hopefully you never have to test it but I'm curious how the system's emergency braking does on those same kind of road conditions. Have you used the adaptive cruise control with snow on the road? I noticed people have said that the system constantly brakes and accelerates and it annoys some people. I'm wondering how that transfer over to when the road isn't clear and the tires are slipping a bit because of the abrupt acceleration and deceleration.
Not sure I know what you mean by being stopped. I tested all functions that I know of with the eyesight system. When the vehicle in front of me drove off, I stayed put long enough for eyesight to tell me the vehicle in front of me had gone. So if that's what you mean, then yes, it worked at stop lights.
I haven't driven with a considerable amount of snow on the road... I guess that's the best way I can put it. But I used it in some seriously heavy snow last night and it never flinched.
I wouldn't say eyesight is really abrupt at all. If you're using it in traffic around town (which Subaru advises against) then it'll be as smooth as the traffic you're in I guess. As for being on the highway, this is where eyesight shines. When you're stuck behind someone that keeps varying their speed, I don't have to constantly disengage/reengage the cruise control anymore. I don't typically notice it either. I'll have cruise set at 70mph then look down and see I'm going closer to 65mph because the car in front of me isn't maintaining a set speed.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Also, I have not tested emergency braking; don't have the balls ;)
I've been considering setting out a box in front of the car though to test it.
 

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Also, I have not tested emergency braking; don't have the balls ;)
I've been considering setting out a box in front of the car though to test it.
Me either, it doesn't feel right to speed up to something so I need something that won't flip up on my hood and scratch the car. Man the wife would be sooooooo pissed.
 

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I have been meaning to tie a sheet (or similiar) across my driveway to test this. Just haven't gotten around to it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Me either, it doesn't feel right to speed up to something so I need something that won't flip up on my hood and scratch the car. Man the wife would be sooooooo pissed.
Right!?
how about a big block of styrofom ;)
That would be good! Just don't know where to find one. I can get a refrigerator box though..
 

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Let me tell you that I have tried braking with adaptive cruise control and it really does work! Maybe not true emergency barking - not likely to try that unless I do a bed sheet or box test as suggested.
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I wasn't going to trust it completely so I kept my foot hovering above the brake pedal the whole time. Cruise was set at maximum following distance traveling at 65 mph. I traveled to work one day on a local freeway loop and the car in front got off on the same off ramp. With adaptive cruise control engaged the Subie slowed down smoothly and came to a complete stop with no brake pedal at all! I started it up again by using the resume switch and no gas pedal. I was just steering. I did adjust the cruise control to the road speed of 40 mph after I started. I my driving experience with Eyesight braking (with perfect conditions where I could take over manual control if necessary) have only happened a couple of times but it does validate that the function works. Driving conditions were perfect clear day so I don't know about less than ideal weather conditions.
<o:p></o:p>
If it works half as well in the snow, it would be great.<o:p></o:p>

Collision avoidance alerts come in handy around town and invariably someone will pull out in front of me at a snail's pace. We all get distracted from time to time and so far Eyesight has proved itself worth the cost. I expect that something like this will be offered on all cars as an option and then eventually be mandated much like seatbelts and headrests (for those of you old enough to remember that !)<o:p></o:p>
 

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Not sure I know what you mean by being stopped. I tested all functions that I know of with the eyesight system. When the vehicle in front of me drove off, I stayed put long enough for eyesight to tell me the vehicle in front of me had gone. So if that's what you mean, then yes, it worked at stop lights.
I haven't driven with a considerable amount of snow on the road... I guess that's the best way I can put it. But I used it in some seriously heavy snow last night and it never flinched.
I wouldn't say eyesight is really abrupt at all. If you're using it in traffic around town (which Subaru advises against) then it'll be as smooth as the traffic you're in I guess. As for being on the highway, this is where eyesight shines. When you're stuck behind someone that keeps varying their speed, I don't have to constantly disengage/reengage the cruise control anymore. I don't typically notice it either. I'll have cruise set at 70mph then look down and see I'm going closer to 65mph because the car in front of me isn't maintaining a set speed.

My reference to the stop signs and stop lights was out of my curiosity of the windshield area where the stereo cameras are placed would be covered in snow. Some people have said when the sun is directly shining at you that the system has to stop operating because it can't see either. The same goes for fog.

I was wondering if, depending on the amount of snowfall and how much in a certain period of time, would temporarily require the system to shut down until the cameras could see again. But, as I was driving to work today, I noticed my Forester wipes the entire windshield to the top where EyeSight cameras would sit so that answered a part of my question.

My other concern comes when you wake up and it stopped snowing but there's snow on top of the car. I'm wonder how quickly and how often the EyeSight system shuts down or stops operating when the camera vision is interrupted. You know, like when you're coming to a stop and the snow on top of your car comes sliding forward onto your engine hood from your roof.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Let me tell you that I have tried braking with adaptive cruise control and it really does work! Maybe not true emergency barking - not likely to try that unless I do a bed sheet or box test as suggested.
<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p>
I wasn't going to trust it completely so I kept my foot hovering above the brake pedal the whole time. Cruise was set at maximum following distance traveling at 65 mph. I traveled to work one day on a local freeway loop and the car in front got off on the same off ramp. With adaptive cruise control engaged the Subie slowed down smoothly and came to a complete stop with no brake pedal at all! I started it up again by using the resume switch and no gas pedal. I was just steering. I did adjust the cruise control to the road speed of 40 mph after I started. I my driving experience with Eyesight braking (with perfect conditions where I could take over manual control if necessary) have only happened a couple of times but it does validate that the function works. Driving conditions were perfect clear day so I don't know about less than ideal weather conditions.
<o:p></o:p>
If it works half as well in the snow, it would be great.<o:p></o:p>

Collision avoidance alerts come in handy around town and invariably someone will pull out in front of me at a snail's pace. We all get distracted from time to time and so far Eyesight has proved itself worth the cost. I expect that something like this will be offered on all cars as an option and then eventually be mandated much like seatbelts and headrests (for those of you old enough to remember that !)<o:p></o:p>
Haha, I did the same thing when I first tested eyesight in traffic! Only sort of trusting it but keeping my foot hovering over the pedal. It works brilliantly and I'd agree that it's worth every penny.
My reference to the stop signs and stop lights was out of my curiosity of the windshield area where the stereo cameras are placed would be covered in snow. Some people have said when the sun is directly shining at you that the system has to stop operating because it can't see either. The same goes for fog.

I was wondering if, depending on the amount of snowfall and how much in a certain period of time, would temporarily require the system to shut down until the cameras could see again. But, as I was driving to work today, I noticed my Forester wipes the entire windshield to the top where EyeSight cameras would sit so that answered a part of my question.

My other concern comes when you wake up and it stopped snowing but there's snow on top of the car. I'm wonder how quickly and how often the EyeSight system shuts down or stops operating when the camera vision is interrupted. You know, like when you're coming to a stop and the snow on top of your car comes sliding forward onto your engine hood from your roof.
I see. Well I already addressed that the windshield wipers cover the whole windshield up to where the cameras are. And when I didn't use my wipers for a while (occasionally forget the Subie doesn't have auto wipers like my Chrysler) the system never got upset or lost sight of anything. If there was real accumulation like after sitting overnight, then yes it would not function obviously haha. The following morning was actually quite foggy. It wasn't 'clouds on top of the beartooth pass' thick, but it visibility was probably a city block. Eyesight worked flawlessly then as well.
If snow were to slide down the roof in the event of braking, then I'm sure eyesight would be momentarily hindered, but it'd bounce back quickly.
 
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