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2013 OB 2.5 CVT
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128 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
According to the owners manual you can not use fix-a-flat or like products as it will ruin the tire pressure sensor. I have always kept fix-a-flat in all my cars as a flat tire in the wrong place can be very dangerous both in where it happens and trying to fix it in traffic or bad weather. My wife and daughter have it as a safety product. I will keep a can just in case but probably not use it unless necessary. Question is, is there any "like" product that is safe to use with pressure sensors? Thanks.
 

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'13 XV Crosstrek Premium CVT
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380 Posts
I think it comes down to what's important. If it's too dangerous (weather, location, etc) to change a flat and the fix-a-flat ruins a sensor, then so be it. $60-$70 for a new sensor, plus the programming fee at a dealership. And of course the cost of a new tire, mounting, balancing, etc.
 

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While some don't use FIX A FLAT because they say it makes it hard for tires to be patched since the area around the puncture needs to be cleaned down to the rubber plus it can gum up the schrader valve. Your decision - especially when you have an emergency.

However, the Fix-a-Flat Web site says that Fix-a-Flat is safe to use with a TPMS. Fix-a-Flat also says the tire can be cleaned with a rag and water before patching.

Or, call the Subaru road service line and let the pro decide to swap your spare or haul your car. Still, if you NEED to use Fix-a-Flat for what ever reason ....

Also, try googleing 'fix a flat and TMSP' for other products.
 

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2007 outback 2.5i
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271 Posts
i carry a plug kit and a small electric air compressor. i don't want to botch the wheels or the sensor, and i've not had a plug fail (yet).

now you obviously have to find the leak to plug it, but i've fixed several where the nail or screw was visible so that simplified things.

i've tried fix-a-flat on my lawnmower tires (since i'm can't find the **** leak without pulling off the wheel) and it just doesn't get it sealed. of course the lawnmower isn't spinning the wheel like a car is.
 

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(formerly) 03 H6 OBW , (presently) 06 WRX Sportwagon & 2021 Honda CR-V
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18,664 Posts
what about that Slime stuff?

I once pulled the inside out of the valve on a tire for our van that had been 'rejected' for repiar by Discount (due to the hole being at the edge of the tread) I pulled a small nail out, poured the Slime in thru the valve, replaced the valve, aired up the tire, tilted it and rolled it around some to distribute the Slime.

remounted and drove a little, set the pressure. lasted as long as the rest of the tires.

But I can understand not wanting to carry a compressor. Yeah, I've done it but, When I travel out of town, I still carry fix-a-flat. But, I don't have TPMS and this thread is interesting to me. Seems like the system is kinda a hassle.
 

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2013 OB 2.5 CVT
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128 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yup, I really don't need a pressure sensor, I have been driving for decades without one. But it's there. I have also used fix-a-flat a number of times over those years and not once did a tire dealer tell me they could not fix the tire or balance it because of it. So I don't know how much of that is hype or just a way some places sell tires. Actually, the plug and pump is not a bad idea. I have plugged tires at home before. Any way, I will keep it in the car for emergencies and see how much it costs if I ever have to use it. Thanks all.
 

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What's wrong with driving on a flat tire until you can find a safe place to put the spare on? There should never be a situation where changing a tire is dangerous. I can't count the number of times I've encountered drivers creating a hazard because they are stopped on the shoulder for a flat.
Being alive is worth the cost of a new tire.
 

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2011 Outback 2.5i Premium, CVT, Steel Silver, all-weather package. Upgrades: Tweeter kit, BlueConnect, media hub, remote start, Curt 2" receiver hitch.
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What's wrong with driving on a flat tire until you can find a safe place to put the spare on? There should never be a situation where changing a tire is dangerous. I can't count the number of times I've encountered drivers creating a hazard because they are stopped on the shoulder for a flat.
Being alive is worth the cost of a new tire.
I cannot agree more. I cringe every time I see someone changing a tire on the side of a highway. A guy I went to high school with was crippled when a car hit him after he stopped to help someone change a tire. Just drive to a safe place. If it really is that sketchy of an area, I wouldn't want to get out to use Fix-a-Flat either. If you ruin a tire or even a rim, so be it. Your safety is the top priority.

I have had to make that decision twice... Once when I had a flat in my old Benz. I just drove to the next exit, found a service station, and pulled in. No drama. The other time, I had a blowout on the highway in a class A motorhome. I pulled onto the shoulder to take a look, then decided to continue (on the shoulder) until I got to an area where I could pull further off the road. The tire and rim were toast, but that was just from the initial blowout, anyway.
 

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2013 OB 2.5 CVT
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128 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Oh there are lots of reasons. I don't want my daughter or wife stranded somewhere. Driving on a flat can be very dangerous. I'm in the service and have driven east coast to west coast a number of times. There are stretches of highway that are empty for a long time. Years ago I had a flat before I started carrying fix-a-flat and changed a tire on a deserted road. Just as I was putting the flat tire in the back a truck with a bunch of drunks decided to drive by and throw a log at me. If it had hit, it would have killed me. I would not have been there if I had only taken two minutes to use fix-a-flat. What if that had been my wife or daughter? Not sure driving slowly on a flat tire would have helped and driving fast would have been dangerous. There are many reasons to want to get a tire fixed quickly which is the reason I carry it and why I have a can in each car my family uses. I still will use it if required, I just wondered if there was a product that would not screw up the pressure sensor. Appreciate everyones thoughts though, I realize it is a personal decision.
 

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2011 Outback 2.5i Premium, CVT, Steel Silver, all-weather package. Upgrades: Tweeter kit, BlueConnect, media hub, remote start, Curt 2" receiver hitch.
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Then just use the Fix-a-Flat. If it ruins the TPMS (and it may not), it can be replaced for less than the cost of a replacement tire. I would certainly rather replace a TPMS Sensor than worry about my son's safety.
 
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