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Hi, I have a 2019 Outback 2.5L purchased brand new last year. Around 8k miles it was low on coolant. Now, around 9400 miles it is getting low on coolant and the brake fluid is almost empty. I have talked to 1 mechanic, a few Subaru service advisors and they said that it's unusual that I'm running low on fluids this early. I have not had any other issues with my Outback so far. Any advice/similar issues?
 

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Several people, including me, have commented about the need to periodically add coolant for many thousands of miles when the car was new. In my case, and, I think, most others, the need to do so eventually stopped. In my case, several "top-offs" were needed, partly, I think, because the dealer's service department didn't really top it off, but brought the level so that it was between the Fill and Full marks while the engine was hot, which was actually close to the Fill line when measured correctly, cold. I bought a jug of coolant, topped it off cold, marked the level on the overflow tank at operating temperature with a Sharpie, and use that as a guide when checking fluids when hot. It has been a couple of years since it was last necessary to add more.

Brake fluid dropping like that is not common. Do you see any unknown oily fluids on the ground where you regularly park? Perhaps have them top it off once, monitor it carefully, and if it continues dropping, have the brake system thoroughly checked out. If your dealer refuses to help, call Subaru and get them involved.
 

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You shouldn't top off a brake fluid reservoir. The reservoir holds the necessary volume of fluid to last through the pad wear. If it's low the pads are worn down and the fluid is now in the calipers behind the pistons, or you have a leak. Either means getting the wheels off and checked.
 

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That's good general advice, cardoc, but if the reservoir is "almost empty" after 9400 miles, that suggests that something is clearly wrong.

Could pad wear really account for emptying the whole reservoir? In my case, after 30,000 miles the drop in brake fluid level was barely noticeable; at that point the fluid was changed out and the reservoir was filled again. 30,000 miles later, after another very small drop, the fluid was again changed and topped up. I do tend to go easy on brakes, and the original pads were still in good shape at the 66,000 mile service a few months ago, but even so, almost full to almost empty seems like a lot of brake fluid.
 

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Exactly, something is awry.

Doing a brake system flush is always good. The point with topping off the reservoir is that if you add to it, you won't get the red brake light on when the fluid level gets low, which generally indicates pad wear. When you do the flush, you can mark the reservoir and put the level back where it was. This way you get the brake light coming on before the pads start grinding.

And yes, the pads should be lasting to 80-120k miles. I've been seeing the brakes wearing at all four wheels simultaneously, so plan for a 4 wheel brake job when it comes due.
 
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