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2016 Outback 3.6R Ltd. w. Eyesight
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228 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Subaru newbie here; bought a 2016 3.6R Ltd w/ Eyesight about a month ago with only 8K miles on it. I take it from reading this forum that swapping in a larger capacity battery would be a good thing. My last three cars have been Hondas (still own two of them) -- when the battery is changed (or has even just been disconnected for a while I believe) you're supposed to perform an "idle learn" procedure, which I guess is for the ECU's benefit. Is there something similar, or any other procedure, that Subaru recommends, and is it something an old shade tree mechanic can do at home, or does it require special equipment? Thanks gang.
 

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2015 Outback 2.5i Limited, Ice Silver/Black
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2,422 Posts
Just change the battery and drive. It will figure itself out. But you will need to reset auto front windows (in manual). But you should still be under warranty through 3 years, so I'd run what you brung.
 
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'15 Outback 2.5i Premium
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2,590 Posts
Are you having battery problems? If it were me, I'd see how well the current battery works before swapping it out just because anonymous Internet forum posters say you should. Save your money and change the battery when it becomes a problem.

Not everyone has the same experience that some here complain about; I'm still using the OE battery after 2 1/2 years and 40,000 miles. Never had a problem. It cranked right up even the times after it sat idle for almost 5 days in Montana last winter (single digit temperatures F) and almost 7 days in El Paso in June (triple digit temps F every afternoon). I sometimes use a power port to run my telescope for hours, and occasionally to run a 12V vacuum, with the radio on for the better part of an hour.

After the battery has been disconnected, the ECU wakes up in a default state and will have to re-learn its optimum settings, so performance may be degraded for a while. As far as I know, there is nothing you need to do but drive it, and it will come back up to snuff. There are a few things you will need to do, though, like re-initialize the power windows; there are instructions in your Owner's Manual under "Initialization of power window" or something like. I think the radio presets will remain, but the trip meters will reset to zero, so record their values before disconnecting the battery if you're using them to track something. There may be various vehicle customization odds and ends that get reset, too. Not sure.

This can be avoided by using a "keeper" voltage on the system. There are various ways to do this, but some just prefer to reset things afterward as simpler and safer.

Welcome, and enjoy your new car.
 

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2016 Outback 3.6R Ltd. w. Eyesight
Joined
228 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the info and advice guys. No, I'm not having an issue, just looking to avoid one, particularly since my wife is the primary driver of the Outback and the reason we bought it was that she got tired of being stranded by recurring charging issues with her 2012 CRV (guess who's driving it now.) I may wait to upgrade when the OE battery goes south, which I guess could be tomorrow or two more years. In the meantime, both the Outback and the CRV are carrying jump-packs. I haven't had to worry much about charging systems since my 1961 Impala, which had a generator not an alternator. :^)
 
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