Subaru Outback Forums banner

41 - 60 of 76 Posts

·
Registered
Outback 2011 3.6R Premium
Joined
·
1,927 Posts
I suspect the speed sign recognition is a by product of the Toyota part ownership of Subaru.

The Toyota Corollas have had this technology in Australia for several years now.

Seagrass
 
  • Like
Reactions: SilverOnyx

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Everyone needs to realize all this is is the current gen outback making its first Australian debut. I went over the whole thing and the only thing new there is the speed Sign Recognition which actually seems really awesome and I hope it comes the US MY22 models. Other than that the differences are probably caused by how they measure it there.
So I need to eat some crow here. Most of the vehicle is just the 6th gen outback. That eyesight system however is new. It appears to mostly be eyesight X witha few missing feature. Likely due to not have the detailed street data that they do in Japan. Just a guess.
 

·
Registered
2020 Outback Limited
Joined
·
149 Posts
I suspect the speed sign recognition is a by product of the Toyota part ownership of Subaru.

The Toyota Corollas have had this technology in Australia for several years now.

Seagrass
This is very important to remember that Toyota HAS bought into Subaru and there is some back and forth transfer of technologies. Some of this is Toyota helping with the Hybrids, and then Subaru helping with the CVT's. I am sure there are other things that they both share back and forth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Everyone needs to realize all this is is the current gen outback making its first Australian debut. I went over the whole thing and the only thing new there is the speed Sign Recognition which actually seems really awesome and I hope it comes the US MY22 models. Other than that the differences are probably caused by how they measure it there.
Just a few weeks ago I test drove '21 Onyx and Limited trims that had the speed sign recognition. I'm not sure what the cutoff point is for when it is included or not, but the Premium I ended up buying does not have it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Just a few weeks ago I test drove '21 Onyx and Limited trims that had the speed sign recognition. I'm not sure what the cutoff point is for when it is included or not, but the Premium I ended up buying does not have it.
The current models pull the speed limit information from the navigation database and is known to be pretty horribly inaccurate. It also requires have a trim that includes navigation. This new system uses the eyesight cameras to read the speed limits live. So one can actually have confidence in it. Not sure what intelligent speed limiter means. Hopefully you can use it to set the cruise to something like 5 over the speed limit. It would suck if it only allowed for at the limit settings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
I suspect the speed sign recognition is a by product of the Toyota part ownership of Subaru.

The Toyota Corollas have had this technology in Australia for several years now.

Seagrass
Very much possible. It might even be less about technology and more about patent access. Who knows, but Toyota's feature is where I first heard of the option and have been hoping it comes to Subaru ever since.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
The current models pull the speed limit information from the navigation database and is known to be pretty horribly inaccurate. It also requires have a trim that includes navigation. This new system uses the eyesight cameras to read the speed limits live. So one can actually have confidence in it. Not sure what intelligent speed limiter means. Hopefully you can use it to set the cruise to something like 5 over the speed limit. It would suck if it only allowed for at the limit settings.
Interesting, was not aware that was how it was working. I had a '20 RAV4 with the feature for a year and am still very much unsure how I feel about it. It was nice to be able to see the speed limit on the dash, but it wasn't perfect and would sometimes miss signs, especially school and construction zone signs or the variable signs they use in the mountain passes here in Colorado. It was just good enough that I got out of the habit of paying close attention to the speed limit signs, which was making me a bit concerned that I would get a ticket some day as a result. It was very good at recognizing stop and yield signs, but this was limited to one very specific screen in the CID that I never used. So I saw little benefit from that aspect of it. Plus, at a stop or a yield your head needs to be up and looking out, not buried in the dash. Toyota's system shows promise, but still needs work I think.
 

·
Registered
MY19 Outback 3.6R Premium
Joined
·
39 Posts
Key differences I can see in the AU Gen6 compared to the AU Gen5:
  • Looks like they've finally dropped halogen headlights, LED across the range now.
  • The PDF brochure doesn't say it, but it implies that Adaptive Driving Beam is part of the LED headlights, ergo all variants, not just the top-end now have it.
  • No mention of SRH on any variant, but that will have to still be there if ADB is still a feature as they work in tandem.
  • Cladding is standard on all variants now (previously the Standard variant didn't get it, was an optional extra).
  • We finally get a shark fin antenna to replace the awful rear-window integrated antenna that lost reception when your shadow moved.
  • Heated steering wheel.
  • Heated rear seats, previously only fronts were heated. No mention of vented seats again.
  • 12v outlet in the cargo space is standard now, previously was a $70 extra accessory.
  • We finally get RAB, all Subaru models in Australia have only received this as they moved onto the Global Platform.
  • Slightly greater towing rating (up 200kg).
  • EyeSight version 4 with the intersection and steering avoidance features, and the speed sign monitoring and haptic feedback for the steering wheel.
  • Higher ground clearance matching the Forester.
  • The Driver Monitoring System.
  • 18" wheels across all variants (previously the Standard variant came with 17" wheels while the others had 18").
  • The larger screen infotainment system.
  • Sports pedals, previously we only had standard rubber pedals across all variants, even in the 3.6.
  • Auto-folding mirrors when parked (previously had to manually press the retract button).
  • Seat position memory now includes mirror position memory (previously didn't).
  • Door mirror caps (previously the "Outback" strip along the side of the car would be chrome on the 3.6 and normal black plastic on other variants, and we didn't have door mirror differences)
  • Everything else is as per Gen5.

Received my invite from Subaru for launch day, so will be keen to check it out in the flesh in a couple of weeks. There's already a couple Gen6's I've spotted driving around in Sydney, no doubt salespersons getting some driving time in them to get to know the new model.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Key differences I can see in the AU Gen6 compared to the AU Gen5:
  • Looks like they've finally dropped halogen headlights, LED across the range now.
  • The PDF brochure doesn't say it, but it implies that Adaptive Driving Beam is part of the LED headlights, ergo all variants, not just the top-end now have it.
  • No mention of SRH on any variant, but that will have to still be there if ADB is still a feature as they work in tandem.
  • Cladding is standard on all variants now (previously the Standard variant didn't get it, was an optional extra).
  • We finally get a shark fin antenna to replace the awful rear-window integrated antenna that lost reception when your shadow moved.
  • Heated steering wheel.
  • Heated rear seats, previously only fronts were heated. No mention of vented seats again.
  • 12v outlet in the cargo space is standard now, previously was a $70 extra accessory.
  • We finally get RAB, all Subaru models in Australia have only received this as they moved onto the Global Platform.
  • Slightly greater towing rating (up 200kg).
  • EyeSight version 4 with the intersection and steering avoidance features, and the speed sign monitoring and haptic feedback for the steering wheel.
  • Higher ground clearance matching the Forester.
  • The Driver Monitoring System.
  • 18" wheels across all variants (previously the Standard variant came with 17" wheels while the others had 18").
  • The larger screen infotainment system.
  • Sports pedals, previously we only had standard rubber pedals across all variants, even in the 3.6.
  • Auto-folding mirrors when parked (previously had to manually press the retract button).
  • Seat position memory now includes mirror position memory (previously didn't).
  • Door mirror caps (previously the "Outback" strip along the side of the car would be chrome on the 3.6 and normal black plastic on other variants, and we didn't have door mirror differences)
  • Everything else is as per Gen5.

Received my invite from Subaru for launch day, so will be keen to check it out in the flesh in a couple of weeks. There's already a couple Gen6's I've spotted driving around in Sydney, no doubt salespersons getting some driving time in them to get to know the new model.
Wow. I'm shocked that they don't have ventilated seats on the touring. Australia is, in general, closer to the equator than the US so it is hotter. I live in OKC which is at 35.5 Lat and I personally hate how hot the summers are here. Very much hoping the MY22 Forester has ventilated seats like the Outback and Ascent. Sydney meanwhile is -33.8 Lat so it is slightly hotter. Probably rare you get snow there. I would think ventilated seats would be important.
 

·
Registered
(Australian spec) 2019 MY19 Outback 3.6R CVT.
Joined
·
533 Posts
Subaru Australia have turned up the wrong road for us.

First they dropped the Foz XT, then the Liberty (Legacy), then the 3.6 engine with the TR690 HT CVT, released a useless hybrid Forester that doesn’t even have a full size spare, & now no replacement for the 3.6R (e.i. no 2.4DIT).

We’ll hang on to our current MY19 Outback 3.6R for as long as we can & if/when we come to replace it we’ll start looking at the competitor’s vehicles. After owning an Outback 3.0R, two Foz XTs, a Liberty 3.6R & an Outback 3.6R, I never thought it would come to this, but we have no interest in a NA 2.5i DI powered Subaru.
 

·
Registered
Touring 2021
Joined
·
9 Posts
Ordered a Touring in Autumn Green (w/Konig Ampliform 18x8.5 & G015's 235/60/18) last week and have a late April delivery date.
Pretty impressed overall with the test drive, granted there appears to be a slight increase in power although not as responsive as my wife's Rav 4 Hybrid and the increased 2000kg towing capacity is welcomed.
As others have mentioned, super disappointed about no 2.4T, but hopefully Subaru Australia will rethink for '22 and will trade up immediately IF that happens.
Will post some images once I take delivery w/new wheels.
Cheers
Marc
 

·
Registered
MY21 Outback Touring Storm Grey
Joined
·
145 Posts
Picked up an MY21 Touring on Thursday - quite impressed
 

·
Registered
Touring 2021
Joined
·
9 Posts
Picked up an MY21 Touring on Thursday - quite impressed
[/QUOTE

Well done Scott, did you check the build date?, all the ones I saw were '20 build compliance, and why I have to wait till April to get my '21 built Autumn Green Touring.
 

·
Registered
Touring 2021
Joined
·
9 Posts
This recent carsguide.com.au car news article dated 19-Feb-21, titled ‘Subaru Forester turbo unlikely, but boosted Outback on the cards!’ was linked to on the Whirlpool forum yesterday.
Yep,
What's interesting is Subaru Australia's GM, Blair Read announced yesterday (about the 2.4)

There are a lot of calls for the 2.4 turbo and we’d be silly not to be reviewing that option for the future.
Read said the 2.4 was not currently available to the Aussie market, but he made it clear that “we’re working on that”.
 

·
Registered
2015 3.6 Premium
Joined
·
1,246 Posts
Yep,
What's interesting is Subaru Australia's GM, Blair Read announced yesterday (about the 2.4)

There are a lot of calls for the 2.4 turbo and we’d be silly not to be reviewing that option for the future.
Read said the 2.4 was not currently available to the Aussie market, but he made it clear that “we’re working on that”.
That is because I sent them an email about a month ago informing them of my displeasure. They clearly listened to me ;). I think not but collectively if we all make rumblings it could happen. I will probably still replace my 2015 3.6 with a newer 2nd hand 3.6 at some stage.
 
  • Like
Reactions: seagrass and marcm

·
Registered
Touring 2021
Joined
·
9 Posts
That is because I sent them an email about a month ago informing them of my displeasure. They clearly listened to me ;). I think not but collectively if we all make rumblings it could happen. I will probably still replace my 2015 3.6 with a newer 2nd hand 3.6 at some stage.
Yep........you weren't the only one;), I've been banging on about it to SA for the last 2 mths,..........the squeaky wheel sometimes does get the oil.
 

·
Registered
2015 3.6 Premium
Joined
·
1,246 Posts
Yep........you weren't the only one;), I've been banging on about it to SA for the last 2 mths,..........the squeaky wheel sometimes does get the oil.
But does the squeaky wheel get the turbo..............:). I'm hoping so.
 
  • Like
Reactions: marcm

·
Registered
MY19 Outback 3.6R Premium
Joined
·
39 Posts
Comments on Reddit from the Australian Gen6 launch last weekend:

  • No 2.4 turbo this year. As the original Outback Gen6 engine was US made, Japan have been redesigning it to suit non-US markets. While they considered re-using the 3.6 engine, since they want to move away from it, it was designed to go 2.5 NA only this year. We will get turbo next year.

  • Three variants on offer. Bottom end is just "Outback" (previously Standard), middle is "Outback Sports" (formerly Onyx) and top end is "Outback Touring" (previously Premium). Standard kit on all variants are integrated roof racks (except Sports which gets a normal heavy duty roof rack for putting up tents and the like), LED headlights with SRH and ADB standard across the range and integrated DRL and indicator (white DRL fades out to become an orange indicator, white DRL fades back in afterwards), cladding, RAB, EyeSight 4.0 with speed sign reading, intelligent speed limiter and intersection crash avoidance along with all the other standard Eyesight features we're already familiar with, 12v outlet in the back, heated front and rear seats, large size infotainment system, keyless start with tailgate PIN code access. Rear camera is now high resolution. We also finally get a heated steering wheel. All models have alloy wheels and SI-Drive. Ride height is 213mm, same as Gen5. The Forester ride height of 220mm will be considered next year. We also finally get a shark fin antenna to replace the awful rear window integrated antenna we had in Gen5.

  • Sports and Touring variants gain in car navigation with high resolution side and front cameras in addition to the reverse camera along with sports pedals. Touring gets a sunroof and haptic feedback in the steering wheel which vibrates the left or right side of the wheel to indicate which side of the road you are drifting off. Touring also sees the side mirrors Auto fold when turning the car off, while the other two trims have to press a manual retract button. Touring gets the Harmon Kardon sound system.

  • Eyesight 4.0 reads speed road signs very quickly and you can tie that into the intelligent speed limiter to adjust your cruise speed to the legal limit. You can turn this off, or set a limit of out of range speed you want to go, eg: 10 over. Driver eye tracking for distractions is not intrusive and works well. Lane centering is excellent and can easily drive through a curved road with ease, but only where there are painted lines.

  • The new turning circle is very tight. Easily 1-2 metres tighter than Gen5.

  • Emergency braking is excellent. Very hard stop from moderate high speed.

  • Noise in the cabin is significantly reduced over Gen5. Almost no road noise at all with thicker side glass over Gen5 which was already thicker than Gen5 pre-facelift.

  • Overall drive quality is smooth. 2.5 NA engine has reasonable poke and it's more than acceptable around town, but not enough confidence for overtaking faster traffic. The 2.4 turbo will of course fix this next year.

  • Pricing starts at AUD$39K for the standard Outback and goes up to AUD$50K for the Touring.

  • Auto-stop/start is in all variants, but can be toggled off in the "Outback" (turns back on next restart) and turned off altogether in "Outback Sports" and "Outback Touring".

  • We've also lost the ability to change the colour of the combination meter from Gen5. It's now just white.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
All models have alloy wheels and SI-Drive. Ride height is 213mm, same as Gen5. The Forester ride height of 220mm will be considered next year.
In the US all SUV models (Outback, Forester, Crosstrek, and Ascent) are advertised as 8.7 in (220 mm) of ground clearance. Why would the Australian Outback be made differently?

Auto-stop/start is in all variants, but can be toggled off in the "Outback" (turns back on next restart) and turned off altogether in "Outback Sports" and "Outback Touring".
Wait, you are saying it can be permanently turned off on some models? In the US no Subaru that has it can permanently turn it off. You need to buy a $100 aftermarket solution to do that.
 
41 - 60 of 76 Posts
Top