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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've had my wilderness for a week, and of course I got a giant, 18 in crack across my windshield this morning when something hit it on the highway. I have Liberty mutual and it's covered for free and they use Safelite, but I'm wondering if the windshield is different from other Outbacks, and if they need to be careful about calibration of eyesight and other stuff? It's such a new car I just want to make sure it's done right
 

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2010 2.5 CVT Limited
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When Safelite did my windshield I had the option for OE glass for a little more out-of-pocket cost.
 

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Just had my windshield replaced on mine (Safelite through USAA).

The shop only had the OEM glass in stock, but they gave me the option if I wanted to wait a little bit for non-OEM at a lower price.

I believe the Eyesight recalibration is required if the windshield is replaced at Safelite, but YMMV. I’m still waiting for the calibration data sheets for records.
 

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2020 Onyx Outback
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Call SOA. It's a notorious problem with the Outbacks. They know they are using weak glass that is know to chip and crack for no reason at all or even when the littlest thing hits them.
 

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2008 OB Limited 2.5i, Portland OR USA
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All replacement windshield glass meets industry specifications. And all of them need to be recalibrated after replacement. Stop worrying.
 

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I am confused as to why it has to be recalibrated.
 

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I am confused as to why it has to be recalibrated.
Because all windshields are slightly different - they're not exact copies of the perfect windshield. It's the nature of the beast.

Keeping this in mind, the calibration is performed to assure that the Eyesight system is working as designed with the replacement windshield. I would think that there are some adjustments that can be made during calibration to adjust for minor imperfections in the windshield glass.
 

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2021 Touring XT Abyss Blue Pearl
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And some have reported their eyesight system working better than before after calibration.
 

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And some have reported their eyesight system working better than before after calibration.
And doctors often give sugar pills to people for the placebo effect.

The truth is nobody really knows if their eyesight might react a tenth of a second late in a pre-collision situation. Could mean the difference between being a little roughed up or dead.
But it's pretty easy to rationalize that away because that only happens to someone else.
 

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And doctors often give sugar pills to people for the placebo effect.

The truth is nobody really knows if their eyesight might react a tenth of a second late in a pre-collision situation. Could mean the difference between being a little roughed up or dead.
But it's pretty easy to rationalize that away because that only happens to someone else.
 

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Meta-review of Eyesight Calibration

If you look at the way windshields are made, they are from sheet float glass laid over a form. They're not optically ground and polished like eyeglass lenses. If you look at a typical windshield from an angle, the slight waviness of the curved glass becomes apparent. Subaru Eyesight needs very good optics in the Eyesight area to function properly so they have special specifications (I don't have the specs) for that portion of the windshield.

Given the constraints of vehicle manufacturing, from the factory after the eyesight module and windshield are assembled I'm sure they do a static calibration but not an on-road (dynamic) calibration.

When glass is replaced, the official service manual says to remove the eyesight module, then remove the glass, replace the glass, then re-install the eyesight module. Under those circumstances I think re-calibration is absolutely necessary because the eyesight could be misaligned during re-installation.

Calibration consists of having the eyesight system look at a special pattern target at an exact distance and I think it does a form of electronic correction for any optical distortions, like how software can compensate for lens distortion in a camera. If the calibration fails the eyesight module can possibly be adjusted if it was installed slightly off.

But in reality I don't think any glass company removes the eyesight module before removing and replacing the glass - thus the only variable is the glass itself. Some people who have had to pay out of pocket for calibration and opted not to do so, have reported no problems. But there is a slight chance that the glass installed is warped in the eyesight area and you'd never know it unless calibration was performed.

People who install light tint on the inside of the windshield seem to have no problem with Eyesight despite window tint itself having a certain amount of waviness to it if you look at it at an angle. People have also installed external window films and similarly have no problems. There are also owners who are smokers and have had their eyesight work fine for years despite the certainty that there's smoke film on the lenses.

Eyesight has to have a certain amount of resiliency since roads have different angles both horizontal and vertical, wheel alignment could be off, weight distribution in the car can make it nose up or be tilted, ambient lighting isn't uniform, and it mostly works in inclement weather (within limits).

@DanielAcosta had both static and on-road calibration (dynamic) performed and eyesight worked better than ever, so calibration is a legit operation if done properly - think of it as akin to wheel alignment. Not absolutely necessary but if your alignment is off then you may notice the improvement after it's re-aligned/calibrated.

So my conclusion is that if you don't have to pay for it, absolutely get calibration done. If you have to pay for it out of pocket, it's not absolutely necessary, and if your eyesight behaves strangely one could have it calibrated afterwards (possibly at higher cost?)
 

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Ditto what @SilverOnyx said: I’ve never heard of anyone actually removing the eyesight module to replace the windshield. My second time at safelite there were two other Outbacks getting windshields besides mine, eyesight modules never removed. It’s easy to think the calibration is a racket, but after riding along on the dynamic and seeing the improved performance, I’d say it’s worth having your insurance pay for it. Safelite gives USAA a killer rate on windshields and calibrations, and I suspect they do the same for other companies, too.
 

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So I've had my wilderness for a week, and of course I got a giant, 18 in crack across my windshield this morning when something hit it on the highway. I have Liberty mutual and it's covered for free and they use Safelite, but I'm wondering if the windshield is different from other Outbacks, and if they need to be careful about calibration of eyesight and other stuff? It's such a new car I just want to make sure it's done right
As the one that just broke on a brand new vehicle? 🤔
 

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Ditto what @SilverOnyx said: I’ve never heard of anyone actually removing the eyesight module to replace the windshield. My second time at safelite there were two other Outbacks getting windshields besides mine, eyesight modules never removed. It’s easy to think the calibration is a racket, but after riding along on the dynamic and seeing the improved performance, I’d say it’s worth having your insurance pay for it. Safelite gives USAA a killer rate on windshields and calibrations, and I suspect they do the same for other companies, too.
DItto.. DItto... I had my windshield replaced on my GEN 5 ( 2019) outback. I chose a different brand of glass recommended from the installer , he mentioned that the Subaru OEM glass is much more expensive and Subaru glass was prone to chips and cracks, check the threads on this. He also mentioned that getting the eyesight recalibrated what not exactly necessary unless after driving it I felt it was off or for whatever reason not acting normal. 1 Yr later my windshield is pristine and eyesight works fantastic. The installer I went through has a corporate account with the company I work for and does this for a living, I trust his judgment.

That said, if there is no out of pocket cost to you , I would get the glass and calibration. I would be curious to know the results of the calibration after the install if any adjustments were needed. All this talk about windshield shape and sizes and slight imperfections in the glass they need to compensate for with the eyesight system seems bogus or some lawyers drawing up liability language. , my eyesight works just fine when there is sun glare, heavy rain , fog or snow. Those are bigger contributing factors I would think than the latter.

my 2 cents....
 

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the procedure for the eyesight adjustment does say that if the windshield is replaced, to follow the re-adjustment process flow - and that has a nice bold statement that after the static adjustment, the dynamic adjustment (on road) must be performed. So really they're supposed to do both. step 3 is the static chart calibration, step 4 is the on road one.

516521


new vehicles don't need the on road one, so subaru says... "For new vehicles, «00» may be displayed. A test-drive is not necessary before delivery because high-accuracy aiming setting has been performed at the factory"
 

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When it comes to non-OEM the best anecdotal brand is Pilkington and possibly Fuyao - someone had an issue calibrating with Fuyao but it turned out it was not the glass but the software that wasn't updated or something weird. There are yet other brands of replacement glass with not much to go on as far as whether they're any good.
 
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Following reading this thread, I checked on the UK leading windscreen replacement company's website - Autoglass - to see what they had to say about it.

Autoglass have an ADAS calibration video on Youtube
explaining how they go about it. I was interested to note that they recommend a full tank of fuel and removing items from the boot (that's the trunk in the US) when they do the re-calibration.

Got me thinking. I've put a OE alloy spare tyre in my boot, and it's also stocked with emergency kit (spare outdoor clothes, tools for simple car maintencance, etc.) as I spend a lot of time out in the 'wilds'. I also drive with a fair bit of equestrian tack - saddles, reins and equine food stuff - which also can be weighty. This extra weight must already impact upon the car's Eyesight system. So, I wonder how much 'leeway' Subaru would have programmed into their Eyesight system to account for this (it is an estate/wagon, afterall). If there's a fair bit of leeway, then presumably Eyesights recalibration can't be too precise?
 

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It definitely has leeway but you want the leeway to be plus or minus from a reference point. While they recommend taking extras out of the car, it would make sense to calibrate it to be zero-d at the normal load of the car, e.g. with the spare tire in, your roof rack, emergency supplies, the stuff that are "always" in the car but take out things that are put in and taken out.

If one were calibrating headlights it would make sense to have the car loaded similarly, ideally with the driver in the car.
 
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