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2002 Outback Wagon 2.5L Auto Weather Package
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For my winter travels, I have a sleeping bag stowed in my car, an MRE (4k calories of foods that could ration and keep me alive for a week), but I lack a good way to keep a water container in the car. There was a 1 gallon jug, but it liked to slide and roll around wherever I put it, and even without the cap coming off it tended to weep when it was on its side. Any suggestions?

BTW, my full compliment of emergency gear includes 2 flashlights (pen LED Streamlight and 4D Maglite), safety orange reflective penny vest, tow strap, leather gloves, and the little toolkit that either the dealer or Subaru included with the car.
 

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2003 Outback, 5 MT, 134K, HG changed.
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184 Posts
You could go to the home organizing and storage isle in any big box store get one of those plastic storage tubs with a lid to hold gallon jugs of water (and other stuff around the jugs). The whole tub slides around less than a gallon jug, and if it spills, it will stay contained in the tub. You can even put a cargo strap around it to hold down the lid, and then strap the whole thing to one of the tie points in the back of the car to really keep the thing from moving.
 

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2008 Ford Escape XLS - 2002 Subaru Outback
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246 Posts
Get some velcro and stick it on to the bottom and place it in a corner and velcro it to the side. Cheap $0.99 fix.
 

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2002 Outback Wagon 2.5L Auto Weather Package
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm looking for some ideas on containers as well as how/where to stow them. I like when things basically can stay put when I want to hurl through a corner.
 

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03 H6 OBW & 06 WRX Sportwagon
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not sure about freeze-proof containers.

One thing is the bladders and 'camel-backs' used by bicyclists and campers. They seem tough and might be shaped to store in more 'odd' places.

also, the 'survivalist'/disaster preparedness folks have some water in bags and maybe cans.
 

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2000 Limited Wagon 5MT
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303 Posts
I second the bladder idea. Get a Platypus container and put in in the spare tire or somewhere with extra space. If freezing is an issue, I know Nalgene makes a Platypus-like container with their large lid.
 

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2002 Outback Wagon 2.5L Auto Weather Package
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
This is looking like the best idea for a container:
Platypus® ® Water Tank™
I want a clear container preferably, as I can see if the water is getting compromised and needs replacement. I also need volume - most camelbacks don't hold a gallon or more. I'm thinking the handle strap on the one above may make a nice way to tether to one of the cargo hooks in the back. Now, if only I was sure about the cap being VERY secure and watertight...
 

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03 H6 OBW & 06 WRX Sportwagon
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the one you linked is about a gallon and a half - no reason you couldn't store more than one bladder or platypus (platypi ?) though.

these have a 5 year shelf life (dunno if there are temperature restrictions or if they can survive freezing);[ame]http://www.amazon.com/Datrex-Emergency-Survival-Disaster-Supplies/dp/B0014EOW96/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1345574734&sr=8-1&keywords=emergency+water+car[/ame]

also, if you have one of these; Amazon.com: Katadyn Pocket Water Microfilter: Sports & Outdoors

it won't matter how old the water is!
 

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2002 Outback Wagon 2.5L Auto Weather Package
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The water supply is meant to be multi-purpose - drinkable, sanitary for cleansing, but also coolant safe. If I get stuck in fresh snow in the winter, there will be water around after all... just very cold and fluffy. The large volume is as much for filling a very low coolant volume as drinking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Sorry, no.
I might carry a wee-wee jug though, as I won't want to step out to pee if its cold enough. That or I'll pull the body plug in the spare tire well and try not to miss.

Dreading the possible markup if I buy that Platypus locally.
 

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2000 Limited Wagon 5MT
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303 Posts
Have an REI near you? Their prices are almost always a rip off, especially considering they aren't a mom and pop store, but if it ever leaks you can take it back. I've had one Platy bottle for over 5 years without issue.
 

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2002 Subaru Outback Limited - 2.5 L Boxer H4 - 5 Speed Manual
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341 Posts
You make me wonder about this now too! I too have my OBW ready for the worst. A sleeping bag too, along with a bag of a dozen or so applesauce containers, energy bars, etc. I also have a second blanket, a pair of boots, a hiking backpack full of my camping supplies and a second backpack full of towels and water supplies (water shoes, baggies, etc) - as for water, I just have 4 water bottles stowed in different spots in the back. 2 are in each backpack, one is in the cubby on the left and the other is in the right cubby
 

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2011 Tacoma TRD Sport Double Cab Long Box
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I've never carried plastic bottles of water in mine because I've heard it's really bad to drink the water from them if it's been in extreme heat often (which is the case almost all summer--don't know if there's any truth to that). In the winter, it would just be a block of ice 95% of the time.

I do have a tow strap, extra sweatshirt (maybe 2?), vice grips, screwdrivers, etc. in the spare tire storage area...so far that's been enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I've only had water containers freeze inside my vehicle when it was obscenely cold outside. Like the snowstorm I drove through in the early 90s in Wyoming, where it was below zero, a stiff wind, and even the battery in my vehicle froze solid overnight.
 

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I've only had water containers freeze inside my vehicle when it was obscenely cold outside. Like the snowstorm I drove through in the early 90s in Wyoming, where it was below zero, a stiff wind, and even the battery in my vehicle froze solid overnight.
Where are you located? I can't leave cases of water, soda, or anything in the car overnight most nights in the winter--soda will explode, water will freeze, etc. It's windy enough here where the inside of the car doesn't stay warm for long. Nights are almost always in the teens or lower for December through February anyway. Larger containers (gallon jugs) often won't freeze solid overnight if the temperatures aren't too cold, but they certainly will the next night if I don't drive the car the next day.
 

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03 H6 OBW & 06 WRX Sportwagon
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Where are you located? I can't leave cases of water, soda, or anything in the car overnight most nights in the winter--soda will explode, water will freeze, etc. It's windy enough here where the inside of the car doesn't stay warm for long. Nights are almost always in the teens or lower for December through February anyway.
those small packets I linked can be frozen. I dunno about heat though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have a magical thing called a garage. Most days my car wouldn't be outside long enough to freeze the stuff inside. If it was getting that bad, I'd probably be on my way home when the need for the water happened, which would mean the car would be warmer than the outside already. It doesn't actually get all that incredibly cold out in this part of the PNW most of the time anyway.
 

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I have a magical thing called a garage. Most days my car wouldn't be outside long enough to freeze the stuff inside. If it was getting that bad, I'd probably be on my way home when the need for the water happened, which would mean the car would be warmer than the outside already. It doesn't actually get all that incredibly cold out in this part of the PNW most of the time anyway.
Ha! That makes perfect sense. No garage here, unfortunately :).
 

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so, I know this thread is old but I felt it was important to mention a couple of things.

if you are preparing a cold weather, or otherwise, kit for your car, one of your last considerations should be food. Humans can go 30 days plus without consuming anything but rarely can go safely past 3 days without drinking water. In the event of a snow storm,etc..you should only be stranded for the duration of the storm and a bit after. The only way you would be stranded for longer than that would be if you venture into remote territory without INFORMING ANYONE OF YOUR TRAVEL PLANS. By simply letting people know which way you are heading out of civilization you will save yourself significant trouble.

In the event you are in the snow and run out of water, never eat snow. You will run the risk of your core temperature in an already cold environment. You will need to gather the snow and melt it in a container before consuming. You should also collect falling or very freshly fallen snow to avoid potential contaminents.

most importantly,never leave your vehicle to look for help. If you are unable to drive, it will be almost impassable by foot. This is how people die in storms.

now, throwing some granola bars in there helps to keep your morale up..go for it. But your priorities in the event of a true, remote stranding order should be something on the order of warmth, attracting help, water, then food.

I would also pack a folding snow shovel...
 
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