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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
My gf, has a 2017 Subaru Outback Limited, with 2.5L (the 4 cylinder), with CVT.
Recently our battery died, and we're tired of the crappy group 25 battery that needs replacing nearly every 2 years.

I looked online, and there's a Group 24F that appears size wise the PERFECT battery!
It's also a very common battery, meaning it's sold cheap on Walmart, because it's also the stock replacement battery to many FORD trucks and vehicles.

I want to buy this battery, and install it in my Outback, but the polarity of the pins is reversed (negative terminal towards the driver, positive terminal towards the front.

Is there a simple wiring solution that could take care for it?

I've spent the better part of this afternoon scouting the interwebs, and found these options:
OEM Subaru replacement battery: $225 ?like 350CCA?
Group 25 aftermarket replacement: $75 550CCA
Group 26 aftermarket replacement: $55 (group 26 is weaker than group 25) 525CCA
Group 24 aftermarket replacement: $200 ~650CCA
Group 24F aftermarket replacement: $55 ~725CCA

I live in hot So-Florida, so CCA isn't as important as sustained load.

If I could find a cheap way to extend the positive terminal, I could potentially save tens (if not a hundred) dollars.
Pls help?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm just wondering if I can attach this male positive terminal pin here:

To an extension cable like this:

I know the negative side can easily reach the top side, it's the positive terminals that don't match.

The whole contraption costs $20, and will allow me to install a 24F battery in the future; which hopefully should also last longer than a stock group 25 one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I see! Good idea!
I'll check the cabling to see if the negative terminal can reach this far.
if not, I've ordered a battery extension cable, and post terminal.
What cost me the most, was the zinc coated nuts to keep em in place, as they don't sell them individually (had to buy a pack of 15, for $1 each); and extend the positive terminal cable, and tape it off with some electrical tape or duct tape or something..

I would pay the same price as a group 25 battery, but with a much better battery, and can always re-use the parts.
I also will get rid of the heat guard, and bought heat wrap that would fit the battery better.
 

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I find it interesting that Wal-Mart's group 26 batteries are only 525 CCA but their 26R batteries are 540 CCA, when AFAIK the 26R just means the terminals are reversed.
My O'Reilly Super Start group 26 in my Outback is 540 CCA and so far (over a few months now and sometimes sitting unused for more than a week) it has not had any problem starting my car. Only problem is it's twice the price.
 

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I highly recommend that you don't do this!

Why? As a purely practical matter, if you look at the positive and negative battery clamps on the OE cables you will see that neither is a simple heavy cable with a clamp at the end; they both have other leads attached. If you replace these cables with generic ones, you're going to have to deal with attaching those extra wires somehow.

Mainly, however, you're going to have a car with its battery set up unlike every other car of the same type, and you're going to have cables that are long enough to reach the wrong terminals, so the chances of making someone making an error you really don't want them to make increase dramatically.

This is not a good way to try to save a few bucks.
 

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I highly recommend that you don't do this!

Why? As a purely practical matter, if you look at the positive and negative battery clamps on the OE cables you will see that neither is a simple heavy cable with a clamp at the end; they both have other leads attached. If you replace these cables with generic ones, you're going to have to deal with attaching those extra wires somehow.

Mainly, however, you're going to have a car with its battery set up unlike every other car of the same type, and you're going to have cables that are long enough to reach the wrong terminals, so the chances of making someone making an error you really don't want them to make increase dramatically.

This is not a good way to try to save a few bucks.
True
 

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If you have a Costco available I highly recommend the correct Interstate battery from them. They are not expensive or overpriced at all! Their warranty will last longer then your current experience with batteries. But I suspect you will not need it. If you do there maybe something else drawing current that should be identified and addressed.
 

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My battery died too. I got the Walmart battery which cost a lot less but the terminals were reversed. I undid a few cable ties on the positive cable and it was able to reach, as did the negative. I then added a new cable tie to secure the positive in an alternate location. Cost less, higher cranking amps, why does the battery that fits cost more???
 

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My battery died too. I got the Walmart battery which cost a lot less but the terminals were reversed. I undid a few cable ties on the positive cable and it was able to reach, as did the negative. I then added a new cable tie to secure the positive in an alternate location. Cost less, higher cranking amps, why does the battery that fits cost more???
Please post a picture of this if possible.

Could be a design complication in the group 24 format - I suspect this is why reversing the terminals typically results in a battery that performs differently. You can see this in Consumer Reports reliability testing where one version may do very well, while the other can turn out to be junk. 24F may also be a more common format.
 

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If we are talking about the Walmart Everstart Group 24F in the fifty-something dollar range that would be their cheapest value bottom of the food chain battery. It's labeled "Value" on the case because nobody would buy it if they labeled it "Cheap Crap". A good battery is not something to shop for the cheapest price possible. It's not cheap because the terminals are reversed, it is cheap because it is of lesser quality than the Everstart Maxx line of batteries.
 

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The Wal-Mart Everstart Plus and the Everstart Value (formerly "Value Power") batteries are the same batteries, made by Johnson Controls. The Value ones are reconditioned batteries but still meet the same testing requirements as the new from the factory Plus ones. This is why the Value ones are less expensive & have a 1 year limited replacement warranty and the Plus ones have a 2 year warranty.
How do I know? Because I live in Bentonville Arkansas, home of Wal-Mart HQ, have worked in their home office, and have talked to buyers and product development personnel.
There would be nothing wrong with using either battery, or any other battery regardless of price, if your charging system is working properly and you do not have an electrical drain. This is why I think the emphasis on the draining battery threads is being focused in the wrong place. Again, my Super Start battery from Oreillys (already installed when I bought the car) has sat for over a week with zero driving and still starts my Outback right up. Conclusion: There is a problem in your car's electrical system. More CCA will not solve the issue.
 

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...Conclusion: There is a problem in your car's electrical system. More CCA will not solve the issue.
Impossible to conclude with the info supplied by the OP. I also went through 2 Subaru group 25 batteries (under warranty) in just over 3 years after having confirmed multiple times that I had no parasitic drain. Their batteries are not known for quality, which is why I happily moved on to an MTP-24. But there are also multiple ways to inadvertently drain the battery in this car, some of which may be new to folks - we see that all the time around here.
 

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there are also multiple ways to inadvertently drain the battery in this car, some of which may be new to folks - we see that all the time around here.
I will definitely agree with this assessment as a possible battery-drain cause (rear hatch not closed, Starlink system draining battery while door is open, etc.) And I'll agree the factory batteries are weak.
 

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Costco Interstate Size 24 (CCA 700, [email protected] 875, RC 130) fit perfectly after cutting the battery cover (One cut only on the corner - red line - as shown in the picture). Not cable modification were needed. It was about $95 + tax back in Nov 2018.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
This is a splendid idea, and easy to implement!
Saves you money, is easy, and not dangerous.
If you are working in a Subaru service center, and are afraid that the $250 OEM Group 25 battery from Subaru, won't get sold, then change your sales tactics, because 24F is a go!

I just swapped my stock battery for the 24F,
In my first post I already had noticed the pole polarity, yet some people find it important to remind me again of something I already stated and was aware of.
So a forum member @walker suggested to reverse the battery 180 degrees (pole pins on the driver side), and connect the terminals that way.
Initially I was planning on extending one of the leads, but it turned out that a 24F will work without needing to buy anything that you don't already have! Meaning, no extra money for any leads or else.

Two things I did need to modify:
1- The battery heat shield. if you don't really care about it much, you can cut open the smaller side, and bend it around the battery, using duct tape to fill the 2 inch gap that the shield now has to fit around the larger 24F battery.
Preferably keeping the gap on the other side of the battery, than the engine block.
Otherwise you can buy heat shields for like $16 on Amazon, cut it to size, and wrap it around the new battery, and keep your stock shield for when you want to sell the car.
2- The negative terminal is connected to a zip tie, to the battery holder.
You have to open it, or cut the zip tie. It's needed for the negative terminal to reach the pole.

The positive terminal also fits fine, albeit the plastic looks a bit angled.

Both terminals fitted without stretching or breaking anything, or needing parts or modifying anything else than these 2 things.

The battery is about 0.5" shorter than the battery compartment, so in my opinion, a perfect fit!

The plastic covers for the battery compartments also open fine, despite the negative terminal wire being placed diagonally over the battery.
Battery terminal cables aren't in the way of filling up the battery.

I had to fill up the battery acid levels with distilled water, as they came from the factory a bit on the low side.
The water levels are just topping off the plates, and each cell could have about 1 shotglass of water added for correct values (they still had about 2 shotglasses of space left). I think this is the main reason these batteries fail over time, is because their water levels are too low from the factory; causing almost instantaneous corrosion as soon as a bit of water evaporates.

The batteries are cheaper (value) because they're replacements for Ford F150 trucks (the most sold battery replacements in USA).
I will update you on how long they'll last, even with a 1 year warranty, chances are they'll last at least 2 years.
For a $58 battery, it's not bad!

Car works perfectly fine!
I did end up losing power over the plugs, causing the avg MPG readout to be reset to 16.6MPG instead of 24, but hey.. That was my mistake :)
I accidentally shorted the battery for a second.

See the video down here,
 

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I might consider a 24F battery but I would personally still go with a good one. It appears that one is only 585 CCA. It shows 730CA in the video, and CA is a different number than CCA. I haven't seen any reserve capacity numbers. The Everstart Maxx in the 24F would 700+ CCA category. I still think the regular Group 24 is a solid choice because it had the highest reserve capacity with only slightly lower CCA than a Group 34. But if a basic battery is enough I guess you can't go too far wrong for the price of that one.

Seeing the 24F fit in the video does kind of make me think about trying my Interstate MTP 48/H6 in my Outback. It is the same configuration as the 24F and looks like it might fit. It has slightly lower specs than my current Everstart Maxx G24, but the Everstart will be three years old next winter and the Interstate is brand new.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The 24F has a higher capacity than the stock 24. Even the value is over 700cca. 725CCA if I'm right, but you can find them in your local Walmart for more info or specs.

From a commenter on YouTube, make it a custom to check battery fluids at least every 6 months, preferably right after summer, as most water evaporates during summer.
 
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