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2018 3.6r Touring, Black, modifications: 255-55-zr18 Continental DWS06
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347 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
With increased use of hand sanitizer comes increased need to clean and treat your steering wheel and gear shift knob. I suggest at least twice monthly with a high quality cleaner and moisture/treatment.

This article talks about wiping your hands with a towel. I recommend against that. At 69-70% alcohol, you should let it evaporate which is the recommended time for vrius germs to be killed.

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'19 Outback Touring 3.6R
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259 Posts
Nope . . .

Step 1: Don't let your passengers fondle your steering wheel or shift lever.

Step 2: Keep your car locked so no one can fondle your steering wheel or shift lever when you're not in it.

Problem solved!
 

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2015 3.6R Limited w/ES
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Eh, maybe just take the 30 seconds to let the sanitizer evaporate from your hands before touching the wheel? Based on what I've recently read, and having worked with some related manufacturers over the past decade, there's very little reason to concern yourself over alcohol exposure to vehicle interiors. These days, such materials have to pass a battery of aggressive chemical exposure tests (which often require several hours of constant exposure) to make it into production, and 70% IPA and/or ethanol is one of them. The tiny bit of alcohol that might remain on your hands after sanitizing is never going to be a significant contributor to leather degradation, IMO. If you do happen to have the car long enough to witness such damage, I'm quite certain what you'd see would be predominantly related to heat and UV exposure.
 

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2018 3.6r Touring, Black, modifications: 255-55-zr18 Continental DWS06
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347 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Eh, maybe just take the 30 seconds to let the sanitizer evaporate from your hands before touching the wheel? Based on what I've recently read, and having worked with some related manufacturers over the past decade, there's very little reason to concern yourself over alcohol exposure to vehicle interiors. These days, such materials have to pass a battery of aggressive chemical exposure tests (which often require several hours of constant exposure) to make it into production, and 70% IPA and/or ethanol is one of them. The tiny bit of alcohol that might remain on your hands after sanitizing is never going to be a significant contributor to leather degradation, IMO. If you do happen to have the car long enough to witness such damage, I'm quite certain what you'd see would be predominantly related to heat and UV exposure.
Thanks @AvidHiker I was recently asked about it by family and friends as they know I spend a good deal of time detUling our cars.

So many people (Houston) get in the car and soak hands in sanitizer and are starting the car to get the A/C on. I work in healthcare and know the sanitizer needs to be allowed to evaporate a bit as a timer of sorts to kill germs.

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2008 OB Limited 2.5i, Portland OR USA
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So many people (Houston) get in the car and soak hands in sanitizer and are starting the car to get the A/C on. I work in healthcare and know the sanitizer needs to be allowed to evaporate a bit as a timer of sorts to kill germs.
What I try to do is get into the car without touching anything but the key and the outside door handle - and then the first thing I do when the door is opened and I sit down is use the sanitizer, making sure I do touch the key while the sanitizer is still damp. Then wait the prescribed time for sanitizer evaporation.

This minimizes secondary transfer to other objects in the car - inside door handle, steering wheel, gearshift knob, seat belt buckle, parking brake handle, etc.

Only two objects in or on the car are then potentially contaminated - the outside door handle, and the sanitizer bottle. I clean both when I get home.

I would suppose this also protects the plastic surfaces inside from the sanitizer.
 
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