Subaru Outback Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I find the 18 inch goodyear tires just grab every little rut and pull the wheel all over. I got a loaner 2018 Outback with the 17 inch Bridgestones and it handled fine. ANyone else notice this?
 

·
Registered
2011 Outback Limited. White, Sunroof, 2.5, CVT. Bought 2/15/11. Love it! Broke 109K, 2/20.
Joined
·
449 Posts
I believe you are experiencing a byproduct of the tires, not the 18" wheels. And you might check the TP and it would have been nice to have had the TP on that loaner as a comparison. Also a consideration would be the number of miles on the tires. There are too many variables involved to make a general statement about 17" vs 18" or Goodyears vs Bridgestones.

Funny, but when bias ply tires were the norm every ridge and crack took the tire wherever it wanted regardless of driver input. Today we complain about a bit of it!
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 Lucky Texan

·
Registered
03 H6 OBW & 06 WRX Sportwagon
Joined
·
17,696 Posts
It used to be called 'tramlining' and is def. more tire-related than car-related.


...snip...Noticeable increases in tramlining are frequently uncovered when drivers living in the snowbelt make the seasonal changeover from winter tires to summer tires, or when any driver upgrades the performance of their tires using either the same size or going to a "Plus Size" tire and wheel package. The reason that it becomes more pronounced then is because neither the typically narrower and softer handling winter tires nor the Original Equipment tires generate as much grip or responsiveness as the higher performance summer tires. Since the vehicle's suspension works as a complete package, a higher performance tire will also uncover any previously unnoticed looseness in the rest of the suspension.
Components

Tires have the most direct influence on tramlining because they are the part of the vehicle that comes into contact with the road (and the longitudinal ruts and/or grooves that exist there). Unfortunately anything that increases a high performance tire's responsiveness also increases its willingness to tramline.

High performance tires with short sidewalls that develop lots of cornering power at lower slip angles will be more susceptible to tramlining than standard All-Season passenger tires that develop less cornering force until their slip angle increases. A wider treaded tire will encounter more longitudinal ruts and/or grooves in the road than a narrow treaded tire. A tire with large tread blocks that transmits the driver's input to the road with great precision will also transmit the road's imperfections back to the vehicle's suspension. And because tires become more responsive as their tread depth wears away (which is why tires are shaved for competition and track use), a tire will become more likely to tramline as it wears. ...snip...
https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=47
 

·
Registered
2018 Crystal White Pearl Outback 3.6R Touring
Joined
·
89 Posts
The Bridgestones on my 2018 Touring are fine....no problems.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top