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2015 Outback
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49 Posts
Filing a complaint with the BBB makes me laugh. Filing one on a 9 year old vehicle with 150k miles makes me laugh harder.

Agree with others, time for a new vehicle.
 

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213 Posts
The BBB is the original Yelp. They have no teeth, it's a joke filing a "compliant" against anybody.
It may be that way now but I have had more than one encounter with UPS or FedEx damaging a package and refusing to pay out, until I got the BBB involved and then they compensated. I'd like to think they still make some difference but I haven't filed a complaint with them in years.
 

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2013 3.6R Limited
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1,141 Posts
Whenever I research various contractors for projects around the house that I plan to hire out rather than do myself, I check the local BBB listings to see how many complaints they have had filed against them. If there are more than three or four that have never been reported as being resolved, I cross that particular contractor off my list. To me anyway, that is what the BBB can do for me.
 
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They fixed the car once. We are having to pay for the 3rd replacement at a $4000.00. To have a car on whats going to be its 3rd cvt/front diff with 150,00 miles says to me theres an issue. I could see if the first went out at 100-150k and then needed replaced but ****, 150k and 3rd unit is going in. So I guess at 200k or so i should expect to put a 4th unit in the car?
All CVTs are brittle. The Subie units are better than the others. 50k issues are rare. I wonder if you drive the heck out of these and contribute to early failure.
 

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2011 Outback Limited 2.5i/2018 Crosstrek limited
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5,013 Posts
They should cover the cost of replacing the differentia. They should have caught that the first time the diff blew. they should also cover the cost of a complete tranny fluid change as well because they missed the seals.
 

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2011 Outback Premium and 2010 2.5i 6-spd
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73 Posts
Wagner Subaru is my local dealer (I've never bought a car from them but have service work beyond my ability done there). They are the 11th oldest Subaru dealer in the US - I remember them when they sold British sports cars back in the '60s before they started selling Subaru's. That being said, they have been pretty good taking care of me - they replaced the FB25 short block in my '14 OB without cost or complaint due to the high oil usage, they're replaced a wheel bearing and the timing belt, idlers, and water pump in my '11 OB without issue. Since I've known them (around 6 decades now) I've never heard any real issues with their service department. They are not known as a great place to get a deal when purchasing a vehicle - I shopped elsewhere. As far as a front differential/transmission issue early in the life of the poster's vehicle, whoops. Not every vehicle off the line is absolutely perfect (the lie that American Honda wants us to believe). It sounds as if Wagner replaced the broken parts at no cost the first time which they were not legally required to do - it was out of warranty. Now some 80k miles plus later a seal has failed in the same front differential/transmission combination causing another failure of some sort - the poster didn't say that the components were destroyed but I'd guess that both need removed/cleaned/rebuilt/replaced due to improper fluids in the wrong places. I don't know the service history for this vehicle as in whether or not the differential services were performed per the owners manual/schedule or not - checking levels/fluid appearance/odor are part of this and will indicated problems fairly early unless the seal failed catastrophically and then there should have been enough warning from driveability issues to stop the car and get it towed. In summation, we have an 8-year old vehicle with 150,000 miles on it, the last 80,000 of which apparently have been relatively problem free and coincidentally have a failure in a replacement set of components that failed several years and several years of problem free miles ago. A quick check of pricing for 2013 Outback Limited's in excellent condition for year 2021 shows that it is worth maybe $6000 to $8000. I don't believe that BBB will be much help in this poster's situation. He/she seems to have received services from his dealer beyond those required for a big issue in the past that occurred outside the warranty, experienced 80,000 miles of apparently problem free service from the vehicle since that time, and now as an older vehicle with fairly high mileage has experienced a failed seal, seals being things that many older vehicles have fail. As an aside, my '11 OB Premium w/CVT has 164,000 miles on it and has experienced one rear wheelbearing failure in 10 years. I do a drain and refill of the CVT every 60k miles and have/have had no issues with it at all.
 

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2011 Outback Premium and 2010 2.5i 6-spd
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73 Posts
Can only assume you are referring to trade in value here, since retail is about double that price range
Yep, that's what they'll give you on a trade for a vehicle without a contaminated differential/contaminated CVT that requires a reseal. The price for dealer repairs of this car is fairly high percentage of what it's worth. Might be a good idea to find an independent and use recycled parts if required to lower the repair bill.
 

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2016 2.5 Limited. LP Aventure, Bilstein, Rallitek, Pirelli, Frontrunner, Diode Dynamics
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112 Posts
Retire the car and get what you can. Why you crying on the internet about a high mileage beater. Should have sold it after the first replacement.
 

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239 Posts
OP is in a hard place. The vehicle may be a $10000 car but broken it's practically worthless, nobody will buy it. So how does he get rid of it? Sell it for parts for $500? Or fix it and maybe break even selling it. Idk.
I drove a Toyota I had until I was up against a wall. I had replaced rear trailing arms and soon after did the timing belt, all combined about $1500. The car was 15 years old and had nearly 220k on the clock but ran perfectly, didn't leak an ounce of anything, was in good condition cosmetically, nothing rattled and it drove nice.
But then I began seeing that more was going to be needed. Shocks, struts, bushings, tie rod ends, alignment. I figured up what it would cost to do this and it was about what the car was worth, and after the repairs I'd still have a 220k car with something I'd need to spend money on lurking somewhere. That's when I gave up and traded it. Got a stinking $900 for it, had I sold it myself I could have got $2500, I bet.
But it still worked and the OP doesn't have that. Still hard to justify spending big repair money on a high miler.
 

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327 Posts
This is a frustrating situation. I would also speculate that the failures were dealer mistakes, but can't prove anything now. It is easy to say cut losses and get a new one, but we don't know OP situation. If it were me, I would see what SOA offers, If it is too costly, I would change diff fluid and cvt fluid and drive it. It may go many more miles since the only current issues were low diff fluid level and mixed fluid in cvt. The mixed fluid may not be the inner seal, but improper fluid fills during previous repair. I stupidly followed a youtube video that explained it was easier to fill front diff via the vent tube; the gear oil went into my newly changed cvt fluid because they share a vent🙄. I never started it , but had to do a second drain and fill on cvt. I have 112k miles now and all good. These are nice cars and it is not easy to decide to scrap one. Good luck
 

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2011 Outback 3.6R Premier w/206K miles.
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90 Posts
OP, it's now the 16th. Did you hear back from SOA and, if so, what did they say?
 
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