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2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
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why would you have had to change your links with the 20mm?
Maybe because the end link loads with a 20mm RSB are 144% higher than stock (i.e. ~2 1/2 times stock).
 

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I've had bump steer issues with my Outback since before I put on a 19mm RSB. If anything the sway bar just made bump-steer more pronounced because I'm more comfortable taking corners a bit faster without all the body roll. Swapping the struts for Bilstein's that have more controlled rebound dampening and a more linear travel rate helped a ton with bump-steer but I still get it on occasion. As much as people like to trust the engineers, the OEM dampers are absolute crap IMO, 2018+ are a bit better but still not great.
I've had the car exhibit some wheel hop, but not bump steer. Better damping could help that some... the road surface was going to do that a bit with almost any car though, so it's not a common thing I'd try to work out for most of my driving.
 

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Brucey
'17 3.6
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Maybe because the end link loads with a 20mm RSB are 144% higher than stock (i.e. ~2 1/2 times stock).
Oh shoot.

I think I have the 20mm bar come to think of it. They were out of stock on the 19 and the 20 was the same price.
 

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Oh shoot.

I think I have the 20mm bar come to think of it. They were out of stock on the 19 and the 20 was the same price.
I remember the 20mm one being lower in price by $20 or so for the longest time. Mine is hanging on a wall - and by anecdotal evidence, that wall feels more stable, hasn't budged in any high winds that blew roof shingles off the house. the house should have come with it hanging there from the factory.
 

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Brucey
'17 3.6
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I remember the 20mm one being lower in price by $20 or so for the longest time. Mine is hanging on a wall - and by anecdotal evidence, that wall feels more stable, hasn't budged in any high winds that blew roof shingles off the house. the house should have come with it hanging there from the factory.
I like you.
 

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2019 Subaru Outback Limited 2.5 (Gen 5)
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Discussion Starter #46
Anyo,
You wrote: I put on a 19 mm Subaru OEM sway bar about a week ago.
What kind of vehicle was your wife driving prior to this?
She drives a 2015 Subaru Forester.
 

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2019, Subaru Outback Limited 3.6R
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It is not that complicated. A stiffer sway bar is inferior for offroad/softroad conditions, and Subaru literally advertises the Outback as an offroad/softroad vehicle. You bought the wrong car.

Umm, did you see my signature at all? Did you see picture of my OB? I am the few the proud trying to off-road my OB :rolleyes:
Also, I don't have the 19mm RSB installed because I want as much articulation as I can get.
 
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19 2.5i OB LTD w/SSD Strt Twr Brc + OEM 19mm RSB
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She drives a 2015 Subaru Forester.
OK, just about any Outback configuration, 16 or 19mm RSB is probably going to come across as having less body roll than the 2015. When I drove my wife's Audi A4, I would not corner in it doing 75. Specially in the rain, and in ATL, after the highway has been dry for many weeks, then it gets wet, watch out. That was a great car in the snow too, but it was important not to exceed the capabilities of the car (and driver).
Good luck.
 

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2019, Subaru Outback Limited 3.6R
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I've had bump steer issues with my Outback since before I put on a 19mm RSB. If anything the sway bar just made bump-steer more pronounced because I'm more comfortable taking corners a bit faster without all the body roll. Swapping the struts for Bilstein's that have more controlled rebound dampening and a more linear travel rate helped a ton with bump-steer but I still get it on occasion. As much as people like to trust the engineers, the OEM dampers are absolute crap IMO, 2018+ are a bit better but still not great.
BINGO!
Also, I will add the fact that car "tires" to lane center is unsettling for anyone that has never experience it or that is inexperienced at controlling the vehicle. The tendency is to overreact and overcorrect both which are NOT good form.
 

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2019 Subaru Outback Limited 2.5 (Gen 5)
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Discussion Starter #50
What she felt was most likely the lane centering kicking in and she tried to over correct.
That's plausible and very possible. She did mention something about the rumble strip but didn't understand what she was talking about, so she could have been cornering too tight. However, she did say it was the rear end that lost control.
 

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That's plausible and very possible. She did mention something about the rumble strip but didn't understand what she was talking about, so she could have been cornering too tight. However, she did say it was the rear end that lost control.
I picked up car sight unseen at dealer 300 miles away. 25 miles in when first turned on lane centering car did similar and it was unnerving as steering wheel physically moved and I was not expecting it. The corrected car cut to one side and I tried to correct but car fought me so I was WTF. I CAN drive and have tracked bot legally and less than legally cars since I am 16. So, I am not trying to brag but having driven sporty cars since I am 16 from Chevelles to 911's I know how much and when to correct before a freak out occurs. Now, if an inexperienced driver or a driver is not paying attention freaked and tried to over correct an already wobbly on weak springs OB possibly hitting the bump stops on a dip. I can see where it may cause that issue. Now, 14k miles on my OB with crap on the roof and AT tires I regularly drive at 90 mph+ and will take an off ramp at enthusiastic speeds with perfect knowledge of how the car is going to act.

Food for thought.
 
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Discussion Starter #52
Seems to me there are an awful lot of folks on here that have absolutely no idea what they are talking about when it comes to cars. Even more need to get a defense driving or SCCA class and learn how to drive!
I couldn't find any SCCA classes in my area. I searched and searched for some type of defensive driving school and the best I found was a class called Skid Monster. B&B Driving School | Courses

I've been driving for over 20 years but I'm always willing to up my game.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
Now, 14k miles on my OB with crap on the roof and AT tires I regularly drive at 90 mph+ and will take an off ramp at enthusiastic speeds with perfect knowledge of how the car is going to act.

Food for thought.
I do have a BIG Thule box on my roof. I don't think there was much weight up there, but could have acted as a sail if there was any crosswind. I never really thought much about the weight up there affecting handling, so thanks for the comment!
 
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I do have a BIG Thule box on my roof. I don't think there was much weight up there, but could have acted as a sail if there was any crosswind. I never really thought much about the weight up there affecting handling, so thanks for the comment!
Car nuts are excited how a boxer engine lowers the center of gravity about an inch or so. So, yeah, changing the center of gravity is a big deal. Anybody who is yearning for better cornering ability, while they have a bunch of gear on their roof, needs to reevaluate their mindset.
 

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I couldn't find any SCCA classes in my area. I searched and searched for some type of defensive driving school and the best I found was a class called Skid Monster. B&B Driving School | Courses

I've been driving for over 20 years but I'm always willing to up my game.
I am in Miami, our best defensive driving is to drive on offense :)
Also, who needs SCCA when you have rain at 3pm every day, LOL. I am only partially kidding.;)
 

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I've had bump steer issues with my Outback since before I put on a 19mm RSB. If anything the sway bar just made bump-steer more pronounced because I'm more comfortable taking corners a bit faster without all the body roll. Swapping the struts for Bilstein's that have more controlled rebound dampening and a more linear travel rate helped a ton with bump-steer but I still get it on occasion. As much as people like to trust the engineers, the OEM dampers are absolute crap IMO, 2018+ are a bit better but still not great.
bilstein b4's or b6's?
 

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I couldn't find any SCCA classes in my area. I searched and searched for some type of defensive driving school and the best I found was a class called Skid Monster. B&B Driving School | Courses

I've been driving for over 20 years but I'm always willing to up my game.
P.s. try finding a local car enthusiast forum and look for weekend AutoCross rallies. Typically, they are usually cheaper and done in empty parking lots on weekends.
 

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I do have a BIG Thule box on my roof. I don't think there was much weight up there, but could have acted as a sail if there was any crosswind. I never really thought much about the weight up there affecting handling, so thanks for the comment!
N/P
To give you an idea. I just changed racks both Yakima and even unloaded just based on the aero of each you can feel the difference in how the car handles on highway.
Now throw a large roof box or add weight and an already loose 4,000 pound car is going to get looser.

BTW, that said. Once you get past the fear factor this thing actually handles pretty well for a 4,000 lb SUV on marshmallow springs and shocks.
I really do off ramp it going 75 at times pick a line and it will hold pretty well with not too much body roll.
 

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I've tracked thru this thread but gotta ask, does the VDC not do anything for oversteer? I know in my 10 year old OB it'll tighten up the turn when it detects understeer. I expect it will try to correct oversteer too. The 2.5 doesn't make much opportunity for it tho. In wet conditions, throttling on aggressively at the apex will start to bring the back around but the nanny cuts the power pretty quickly.
I suppose I will have to try drop-throttle oversteer next time I am in a good cloverleaf and see what happens.
 

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I've tracked thru this thread but gotta ask, does the VDC not do anything for oversteer? I know in my 10 year old OB it'll tighten up the turn when it detects understeer. I expect it will try to correct oversteer too. The 2.5 doesn't make much opportunity for it tho. In wet conditions, throttling on aggressively at the apex will start to bring the back around but the nanny cuts the power pretty quickly.
I suppose I will have to try drop-throttle oversteer next time I am in a good cloverleaf and see what happens.
yes it does. the VDC system will either brake the outer two wheels to correct oversteer, or the inner rear wheel to correct understeer. Also, you get Active Torque Vectoring (new with the Gen5 cars onward)... which operates independently and is an "enhancement" for the VDC control which senses an understeer condition and will use braking force on the inside front wheel to help correct the understeer and divert power to the outside front wheel.

At some point you pass the threshold of available traction... and I imagine that these systems are tuned for an overall understeer threshold - their goal is to keep you on the intended optimum path based on sensor input, but that path has to have a baseline and whatever safety margin/design for when they pass a threshold of control.. and then that assumes the setup that was on the car from the factory. It's unclear how far out from the factory setup is less helpful for those systems, nor how much they are pushing back against changes as you make them through modifications (although many people probably never approach the limit of where these are helpful anyway under most conditions).

washboard type bumps (better slow speed damping needed - stock setup is terrible at this), tires inflated to higher pressures (dealer is always overinflating the rears, and they aren't the greatest tires on there from the factory)... and then add a stiffer rear sway bar connecting the two sides of the suspension... won't take much to make the back skip a bit in a corner, especially under power... if you're not expecting it, I could see being surprised and feeling "lost control". There are a few off camber on/off ramp transitions that you can test that out without breaking the speed limit around here... and the road surface has lots of small washboard sections, great for testing out what things like tire profile/size, tire pressure, heavier load up high, in the back, rear sway bar will do to the car. Public roads are going to be so variable in conditions that it's good to have areas like that to test some of them to be aware of what happens vs waiting until you hit that road condition unintentionally and get to find out in a more exciting manner.
 
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