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'17 OB 3.6R Touring [ex-'09 OB Ltd. (2009-16); ex-'01 Audi A6 Avant (2001-2009)]; '14 Impreza Sport Premium
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The added 50-70whp that the 19" sway bar adds makes this not only an ultimate handling machine (near GTR territory) but significantly ups the power output. I would say if you are not used to driving an ultra high performance car with this sort of modification, than your new hot rod is NOT suitable for a novice female drivers who hasn't driven high performance cars for at least 3 decades.

But all's well that end's well. I'm glad that the car isn't totaled and that nobody is hurt. But remember adding a significant handling and power boost to your car changes the driving dynamics insurmountably. To compensate you'd need to change the entire suspension, add Brembo brakes, and lower the car.

Having a family myself, safety is of the utmost importance. Switch the bar back to 16" and save lives.
agree... the most important lesson I learned with my ‘73 911 is that you should learn to drive it at the limit (track, etc.) before changing things. Lots of people tweak things before they really know how to handle the basic setup.

In my 911 my instructor said in session 1 at Mid-Ohio that I was close to the limits of my car’s [stock] suspension, tires, etc. ... by mid-session 2 I’d hit the limit, overdriving my street tires, hanging with more powerful cars with R1s etc.

last thing I’d want my grandkids in is a lifted vehicle due to inherent instability. I’ve seen too many rollovers, often from drivers‘ over correction.
 

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2012 Outback Ltd 3.6r
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466 Posts
Upgraded sway bars can be a double edged sword. On the one hand, they can absolutely increase stability, particularly with a soft suspension, like the 2010-2012 models, which had very soft struts/shocks and springs. I personally had a 45 minute white-knuckle experience, driving 65-70 mph on one of the local highways with a stiff crosswind, causing me to feel like I was chasing the suspension to stay even remotely centered in my lane. Upgrading the rear sway bar helped tremendously, and that plus an alignment, totally cured it's propensity to sway/lean in a crosswind and driving around tractor trailers.

The flip side of that sword is in the way the larger sway bar achieves its mission. Preventing the excessive lean or sway, by using a larger sway bar, transfers the force to opposite side of the vehicle, whereby unloading one side to hold the other side in contact with the pavement, Under normal traction conditions, there's no ill effects, however, under low traction conditions, on say a slick road, the result in reduced weight on the opposite tire can allow the tire to loose grip, resulting in a less than ideal spin or even a slide. Depending upon the type of suspension, this effect can even result in one tire riding on it's edge, verses the flat tread area of the tire. There can also be a loss of some articulation in the suspension, which is why many off-road guys actually disconnect their sway bar, in order to achieve great traction on uneven surfaces, and allow maximum articulation of the wheel from side to side.

Subaru increased spring and dampening rates in 2013-14, and then the new suspension of the 5th Gen (15-19) vehicles, was totally re-tuned. I've had several people tell me they or their wives felt their 15-17 models rode rough, compared to their prior Outback.

Have noticed that attempting to accelerate while making a turn, particularly from a stop, onto a high speed road, can loose traction and become a little loose, I'm tempted to reinstall the original bar on my '12, now that I've upgraded the springs & shocks. My hunch is that the larger bar is no longer needed, with the Rallitek Springs and heavier KYB replacement struts (13-14 model). I'm aware and don't have a problem under those conditions, feeling when she starts to loose grip, and correcting without drama, even before VSC kicks, but not so sure my wife would. - Just safer to have it more controllable for her, and might soften the lone tire bump a tad.
 

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Agree with @cyberdog433 ....No regrets upgrading the rear sway bar on the OB 2011. OEM soft springs coupled with the thinner sway bar made for some unpredictable white knuckle scenarios when taking curves with slight road imperfections at <45mph. The thicker STI bar took that slop away making for a safer tracking OB.
 

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2017 Outback Premium 2nd Subaru owned
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244 Posts
why would you have had to change your links with the 20mm? I’m running that with stock links, no issues
It has to due with the added pressure exerted on the links due to the heaver 20mm sway bar. In the everyday commuter drive, chances are the car would rarely if ever have more pressure than normal on the links. On windy road driving, mountain driving the pressure is greater. I would not want a link to snap as I was in a corner at a interstate/freeway speed. I did my research prior to making this change to the 19mm. To the best of my knowledge the upgraded links would have to be aftermarket, which I did not want to use.
 

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2018 Limited 2.5i
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596 Posts
It has to due with the added pressure exerted on the links due to the heaver 20mm sway bar. In the everyday commuter drive, chances are the car would rarely if ever have more pressure than normal on the links. On windy road driving, mountain driving the pressure is greater. I would not want a link to snap as I was in a corner at a interstate/freeway speed. I did my research prior to making this change to the 19mm. To the best of my knowledge the upgraded links would have to be aftermarket, which I did not want to use.
gotcha. i do a fair amount of backroad/windy road driving during the week to work. i have not changed my links, and like you i dont want to. im trying not to introduce too much aftermarket to the car, if that makes sense. i know i could go with some whiteline links and call it a day but im not trying to add the additional "maintenance"
 

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2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
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If I was designing the car from scratch i would have selected a 18mm bar ...
While it's not often mentioned in these discussions, an OE 18mm RSB is available from Subaru:

18mm RSB = 20451FG010
bushings for 18mm RSB = 20464FG010
 

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'15 Outback 2.5i Ltd PZEV w/ Eyesight, Crystal Black Silica
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220 Posts
The fact that they are all the same size in terms of length and shape is a little bit surprising. I mean actually pretty cool different cars and even different generations of the same car have changes in geometry/platform and wheelbase. It is impressive they are all interchangeable.
 

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Whenever modifying a car with aftermarket performance gizmos keep in mind that if the manufactuers can get it wrong aftermarket can make things worse! VW and Corvair rear suspensions had the same basic flaw. One ended up getting sued, the other got off with rollover's being a quaint little property of "cornering too fast".
 

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2019 Outback 2.5i Limited
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142 Posts
Having owned a 2005 Outback that ran down the road as if it was on rails, we were both very disappointed in the handling characteristics of our 2019 Outback when we bought it last year. One of the very first things I did was swap out the 16mm rear sway bar for the 19mm. It virtually eliminated the rear body roll that we were experiencing going around corners and sharp curves. My wife probably drives the car more than I do and loves it. I have no real complaints either. We're both very comfortable with it.
 

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2019, Subaru Outback Limited 3.6R
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951 Posts
You had a perfectly good car and you dicked with it.

Baffling.
Baffling, you consistently reply to posts with absolutely nothing to add.
 

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2015 Outback 2.5i Limited, Ice Silver/Black
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FWIW, a bump in the road usually results in oil and dirt dropping from vehicles and accumulating. You can see that on the far side of a bump in a straight road. Put that bump in a turn and combine with rain...
 
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2012 Outback Ltd 3.6r
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Just an update, through actual experience at this point. In stock form, with soft springs/shocks, the 19mm is a godsend. With firmer springs & shocks, as I did with my '12 3.6R, by swapping in Rallitek Overload Springs and the firmer '13-'14 dampeners, when installing the lift spacers, it actually has some less than desirable affects as a daily driver.

Having some time last weekend (20th), I swapped back in the original sway-bar with new end-links, as to avoid damaging those on the 19mm bar. (I also installed new links with the 19mm bar, when installing it). Removing the 19mm bar did make some nice, subtle changes.

Firstly, a noticeably more compliant ride, with a bit less giggle on less than glass smooth pavement. Most evident when only one side hits a bump, pot-hole, seam, whatever. With the stock setup, the 19mm was barely firmer riding than the stock bar, but with the heavier springs/shocks, there's more of a difference, a noticeable difference.

The slight wheel hop, or bump steer, when hitting a seam or other irregularity while taking a bend or turn is gone. I've had a busy week having to drive quite a bit last week, including pot-holed roads, highway (>70 mph), and some back country roads, allowing for a good comparison. The combination of the firmer suspension, and larger bar, made for a slight 'bump steer' on the back end. Now it just soaks up the bump, in a firm manner, without that slight sideways 'skip' feeling..

There might be a tiny bit more lean when taking a faster corner, however, the car still seems to corner and follow through the turn just as well, and as good as with the thicker 19mm bar installed, just with a slightly more lean. The stability at highway speeds is still just as good, no feeling like the back end was leaning, or having to try and catch it with the wind or around trucks. - In stock form, without the 19mm bar, any amount of wind or tractor traffic, my Outback felt like it was a handful, which is why the 19mm went on back in '15. I lucked in and was on the highway when one of the windy thunderstorms came through, and there was no pushing around and having make constant corrections due to wind buffeting, just great stability, as well as having both installed.

If you want a quick, easy, and inexpensive fix to sure up the handling, buy the larger bar. If you're planning on firmer springs, like the Rallitek units, to prevent sag, and/or firm it up with a lift, the 19mm isn't needed, and having both might be a detriment. - My preference would be the Rallitek springs, and firmer dampeners, it gives a firm but comfortable ride, even with the lift spacers.
 

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2018 Outback 2.5i Limited, No Eyesight, No Navigation
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2,768 Posts
Just an update, through actual experience at this point. In stock form, with soft springs/shocks, the 19mm is a godsend. With firmer springs & shocks, as I did with my '12 3.6R, by swapping in Rallitek Overload Springs and the firmer '13-'14 dampeners, when installing the lift spacers, it actually has some less than desirable affects as a daily driver.

Having some time last weekend (20th), I swapped back in the original sway-bar with new end-links, as to avoid damaging those on the 19mm bar. (I also installed new links with the 19mm bar, when installing it). Removing the 19mm bar did make some nice, subtle changes.

Firstly, a noticeably more compliant ride, with a bit less giggle on less than glass smooth pavement. Most evident when only one side hits a bump, pot-hole, seam, whatever. With the stock setup, the 19mm was barely firmer riding than the stock bar, but with the heavier springs/shocks, there's more of a difference, a noticeable difference.

The slight wheel hop, or bump steer, when hitting a seam or other irregularity while taking a bend or turn is gone. I've had a busy week having to drive quite a bit last week, including pot-holed roads, highway (>70 mph), and some back country roads, allowing for a good comparison. The combination of the firmer suspension, and larger bar, made for a slight 'bump steer' on the back end. Now it just soaks up the bump, in a firm manner, without that slight sideways 'skip' feeling..

There might be a tiny bit more lean when taking a faster corner, however, the car still seems to corner and follow through the turn just as well, and as good as with the thicker 19mm bar installed, just with a slightly more lean. The stability at highway speeds is still just as good, no feeling like the back end was leaning, or having to try and catch it with the wind or around trucks. - In stock form, without the 19mm bar, any amount of wind or tractor traffic, my Outback felt like it was a handful, which is why the 19mm went on back in '15. I lucked in and was on the highway when one of the windy thunderstorms came through, and there was no pushing around and having make constant corrections due to wind buffeting, just great stability, as well as having both installed.

If you want a quick, easy, and inexpensive fix to sure up the handling, buy the larger bar. If you're planning on firmer springs, like the Rallitek units, to prevent sag, and/or firm it up with a lift, the 19mm isn't needed, and having both might be a detriment. - My preference would be the Rallitek springs, and firmer dampeners, it gives a firm but comfortable ride, even with the lift spacers.
That was kinda hard to follow. You are swapping things around. It is difficult to identify what exactly is on your car at any given point in your post. Maybe provide headings of each configuration as you discuss it. You obviously spent a lot of time on the post. Sure it up.
 

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2018 3.6r
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99 Posts
That was kinda hard to follow. You are swapping things around. It is difficult to identify what exactly is on your car at any given point in your post. Maybe provide headings of each configuration as you discuss it. You obviously spent a lot of time on the post. Sure it up.
Stock set up - wallow, not happy

stock springs + 19mm RSB - happy

Rallitek springs + 19mm RSB - bump steer, not happy

Rallitek springs + stock 16mm RSB - Happy
 

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Moved up to 20mm RSB.....
not problem with wheel hop is ride stiffness..... but MUCH improved handling on highway with crosswinds
 
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