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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So- I'm a college kid and after a long, sparkly-eyed search of all the subarus I could ever dream of owning, I found that I could inherit my family's 2012 3.6R HK Bluetooth No-nav Outback with 111k miles and a flawless service record. We've had it for years and it was one of the cars I had actually learned to drive in.

The only issue I've had with the car aesthetically is that the little blue screen in the center console is more useful as a nightlight than for much else and I want to replace it with a more useful head unit. I've read in a few other posts that using a DMX706S from Kenwood and an Idatalink Maestro RR2 is an excellent replacement, but being COMPLETELY new to car modification beyond my experience playing video games in my (not too distant) youth, I'd have no idea where to even begin replacing the parts, let alone how I'd go about installing them and setting them up.

On a side note, our backup camera is completely washed out- likely the light sensor, and I've heard there are aftermarket options compatible with the head unit system- but again, I just have no idea what I'm doing here.

Is there any help to be found on these forums for a lad like me?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Doing a little bit more research, I've found a few bits and pieces that might work for me. Let me know if anyone finds any conflicting parts.





 

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2010 Subaru Outback 2.5i Limited
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Crutchfield is an excellent resource. I recall also using scosche.com when working on the audio system in my Miata. Usually, the basics for replacing a head unit are the head unit (duh) and a wiring harness for your particular vehicle to adapt your head unit to the factory head unit harness. Or, if you want, you could butcher the harness and do some old school soldering and wire diagram consulting to figure out which wire is what on the factory harness. It's my opinion that the scosche wiring harness route is easier, cleaner, and allows you to reinstall the old head unit if you wish since the original harness isn't getting butchered. The scosche harness plugs into the factory harness and allows you to easily connect like wires together between the factory harness and the harness of the new head unit (no guessing which wire is what on the original factory wire harness) since the wires on the harness are color coded to match and are also usually labelled so you know which wire is what (i.e. black wire to black wire (ground), red wire to red wire (12V power), yellow wire to yellow wire, etc. Worth checking them out. Made my job a whole lot easier.
 

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2012 Outback 3.6r Limited
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I agree on crutchfield. I recently did this. I used the Kenwood DNX706s, but you can use lots of head units. I chose that one because I use carplay or Android auto for nav.
It's also worth getting an idatalink maestro RR2, retains all OEM functions, steering wheel buttons, and gives you gauges, tire pressure monitoring, and code reading.
Then an idatalink harness, metra bezel, metra antenna adapter, idatalink USB/aux adapter cable.
You will need to connect wires to the harness, connect everything, troubleshoot, and pop dash pieces on and off.
You can use an aftermarket backup camera, but you'll have to wire it up, not sure it'll be plug and play.
You're going to have to learn how to read a wiring chart, how to either solder or crimp wires together and maybe how to test wires if things don't work properly. It's not a hard job though.
 
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