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Hi I have a 2011 2.5 outback. I am a climber and go through rough muddy trails to find awesome cliffs. Now this is a problem, the Subaru dealership checked it out and said its because when oil has too much dirt in it the check engine light comes on and the rev limiter kicks in, now that stops my car at 3800 rpms. Now for anyone else that has this car in 6spd, they know this is a huge problem if you need to get up extremely steep hills to get out of the woods. So I need to take this rev limiter out, or else I'll have to get towed out by my brothers jeep every time this happens. (So embarrassing) Please help me out
 

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2012 limited, white, no moonroof or nav
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I sincerely doubt that the rev limiter is in any way effected by dirt in the oil......It is much more likely a product of the traction control coming into play. There is a button that at least partially disables the VTC (Vehicle Traction Control) down by the hill holder and parking brake. When you push it (With the engine running) you should get a yellow "VTC" warning light. See if that helps with your rev limit problem.
 

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2007 Outback XT Ltd
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Welcome to the forum - you posted in the Classifieds, but I am sure a mod will move this thread.

You need to install some proper offroad tires and you won't need to be running at high rpm. Tread lightly!

Oh yeah, find another place to service your car - that one is clueless.

John Davies
Spokane WA USA
 

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I simply cannot abide useless people.
2006 2.5i and 2002 3.0 wagons.
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1: Thread moved to correct area.

2: Get better tires.

3: That dealership has no clue, go somewhere else. Essentially they told you "Because the duck is wearing pants, the sky is made of potato" for all the sense their statement made.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I sincerely doubt that the rev limiter is in any way effected by dirt in the oil......It is much more likely a product of the traction control coming into play. There is a button that at least partially disables the VTC (Vehicle Traction Control) down by the hill holder and parking brake. When you push it (With the engine running) you should get a yellow "VTC" warning light. See if that helps with your rev limit problem.
Well no I'm not losing any traction. I have huge mud tires on 18" wide rims. The problem is that when the check engine light comes on I'm forced with low rpms and a lack of all torque. And if anyone posts should have got a 3.6, I wanted to but I only drive manual, and that model did not.

-the only thing I need to know is how to remove the rev limiter computer so I can continue on my adventurous lifestlye in a car I love rather than having to trade it for a jeep that can handle it. The rev limiter is usual set just over 7500rpms in my car. When the check engine light comes on my car will max at 3750rpms. Help! This really sucks
 

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I reckon the OB drivetrain ECU has a "limp mode" to prevent damage when design limits are exceeded.
With "huge mud tires" and "18" wide rims", those design limits will be easily exceeded.
I'm sorry, the OP's story has troll overtones.
 

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2010 2.5i Outback, 2015 2.5i Legacy w/Eyesight
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I have huge mud tires on 18" wide rims.
18" wide rims? I think you are saying the diameter, in which case I have to ask what huge mud tire is made in an aspect ratio that will fit on your vehicle without rubbing and without suspension modification.

Or, if you are saying you have an 18" rim width (as opposed to the standard 6"-8" range), my next request is pictures please.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
18" wide rims? I think you are saying the diameter, in which case I have to ask what huge mud tire is made in an aspect ratio that will fit on your vehicle without rubbing and without suspension modification.

Or, if you are saying you have a 18" rim width (as opposed to the standard 6"-8" range), my next request is pictures please.
Lol sorry I ment to say I have 18" rims that are also wider than the factory rim by an inch or 2 haha. Sorry, typo
 

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Lol sorry I ment to say I have 18" rims that are also wider than the factory rim by an inch or 2 haha. Sorry, typo
What tire and sidewall aspect ratio are you running? Yokohama Geolanders in 225/55/18 by chance? If so, that's generally the wrong direction to be heading from the standard 225/60/17 tires for offroading tires since you're not changing your section width while reducing your sidewall (and therefore your sidewall flex) from the factory-delivered tire sizes. It depends on the vehicle and tire/rim configurations available, but generally, people downsize their rims for offroading to get a taller sidewall. Getting a taller sidewall increases sidewall flex which has several benefits, but the primary one for dealing with mud/gravel is to let the tires hug the imperfections in the road better by reducing the amount of air in the tires (increase contact patch). People with offroading needs also generally try to maximize the section width of their tires (increase base contact patch). It might be hard to strike a balance between the two requirements for our vehicles since a lot of people will never take them off road (personally, I have not investigated good mud tires for my Outback too much) and manufacturers only make the sizes that sell, but its something to keep in mind for your next purchase. The difference in sidewall flex for a 225/55/18 and a 225/60/17 is probably significant, but it might not make a difference for your use case anyways.

As for the apparent limiter issue, I cannot comment further beyond what has been said already.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
What tire and sidewall aspect ratio are you running? Yokohama Geolanders in 225/55/18 by chance? If so, that's generally the wrong direction to be heading from the standard 225/60/17 tires for offroading tires since you're not changing your section width while reducing your sidewall (and therefore your sidewall flex) from the factory-delivered tire sizes. It depends on the vehicle and tire/rim configurations available, but generally, people downsize their rims for offroading to get a taller sidewall. Getting a taller sidewall increases sidewall flex which has several benefits, but the primary one for dealing with mud/gravel is to let the tires hug the imperfections in the road better by reducing the amount of air in the tires (increase contact patch). People with offroading needs also generally try to maximize the section width of their tires (increase base contact patch). It might be hard to strike a balance between the two requirements for our vehicles since a lot of people will never take them off road (personally, I have not investigated good mud tires for my Outback too much) and manufacturers only make the sizes that sell, but its something to keep in mind for your next purchase. The difference in sidewall flex for a 225/55/18 and a 225/60/17 is probably significant, but it might not make a difference for your use case anyways.

As for the apparent limiter issue, I cannot comment further beyond what has been said already.
Well they're 235 55 r18 which gives me about 4.5 inches of tire beyond the rim which is plenty of tire for a car that weighs 60% less than my last off roader(Chevy). There was no need for more tire than this for a car made of plastic and aluminum lol. And I do have more inches of tire than the factory tires and rims that came with it originally.

But the main issue here is my Low RPM rev limiter issue. Can we please stay on topic
 

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Discussion Starter #14
So pretty much no one knows what's wrong with my outback including the dealer and I'm on my own /: ****. I'm starting to hate my car :( why can't you just work like the day I drove you from the lot! Then it would be an almost perfect everyday car.
 

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But the main issue here is my Low RPM rev limiter issue.
I'd say the main issue is to discover what is causing the CEL to
come on? "Limp mode" is there to prevent cata$trophic engine
or transmission damage when a sensor detects serious trouble.

Aren't there any stored codes after the CEL comes on? Betcha
a 6-pack it has nothing to do with tire size -- or mud in the oil.

You could prolly disable the RPM limiter by hot-wiring/bypassing
the tattle-tale sensor...

...OR you might try fixing whatever's busted,

Looby
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Nothing is busted the dealership checked it out read the tool that reads why the light is on and said the check engine light came on from dirty oil. But I change it monthly so that a load of bs. But yeah if I can figure out where the sensor or computer module is I can gladly just rip it out and never deal with this again.
 

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If it only happens occasionally as you are off roading maybe you could get a cheap reader that clears the code to get going again. but if its happening continuoussly that wouldnt be to practical. wish I had a better idea but chances are the cars just trying to protect itself.

Oh, I just had a thought, could the thrashing and high rpms of offroading be foaming the oil making it read as dirty and tossing a code?
 

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...dealership checked it out read the tool that reads why the light
is on and said the check engine light came on from dirty oil.
Pure distilled essence of Meadow McMuffins! Ask the dealer to show
you where the "dirty oil sensor" connects to the wiring harness.

Just because some village-idiot dealer can't diagnose the problem
doesn't mean there's no problem. SOMETHING is busted -- and I'll
bet that it has nothing to do with muddy oil.

...idiots abide!

Looby
 

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Betcha
a 6-pack it has nothing to do with tire size -- or mud in the oil.
The OP's original primary concern appeared to be with not getting stuck in the mud--the engine being limited has subsequently gotten the most attention. The CEL and the engine failing to work at rates where it should is certainly the biggest concern, but making it so the car doesn't need to work so hard in the first place is another part of not getting stuck in the mud--hence all the questions about tires. Upsizing to an 18" rim for the Outback is typically accompanied with tossing on some high-performance street tires--you can step on the gas all day long and not go anywhere in the mud with those. Sorry if it seemed irrelevant, just trying to help Climbing keep moving.
 

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a huge problem if you need to get up extremely steep hills to get out of the woods.
You are doing something to trigger limp mode which limits revs to prevent self-destruction.
Is climbing "extremely steep hills" when you notice this?
Perhaps the Outback isn't the right vehicle for these extreme off-road conditions?
 
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