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2009 Outback, 2.5L, 5 speed manual
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Discussion Starter #1
Hello...my local Subaru dealership is quoting me over $200 in labour to repalce an ignition coil and wires. I'm not a mechanic but I understand that you remove the spark plug wires, remove the ignition coil (a couple of bolts) and do the reverse to install the new coil and cables. In my opinion, that should only take about a 1/2 hour. Thoughts/comments?
 

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01 Outback H6 VDC, 97 GT wgn w/ ej22, 98 OBW w/ej22
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we don't call them stealerships for nothing.

even if the book time is an hour, $200 sounds high. do it your self.

what car, engine, trans, year miles?
 

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2009 Outback, 2.5L, 5 speed manual
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Discussion Starter #3
Hi..thanks for the reply.

2009 Outback wagon, 2.5L gas, 5 speed manual, 34,000 miles
 

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It's an easy DIY job. Just a bit tricky to remove the three bolts holding the coil on the back of the intake manifold (because of the angle/access), but quite doable. I did it on my 07. I took my time but surely, for an experienced mechanic, not more than one hour.

I doubt they're charging $200/hour, so it must be the time. What are saying? I can't imagine the book time being more than an hour. Is that all they're doing? Not the spark plugs?

Might I ask why the coil and wires have to be replaced at 34,000 miles?
 

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Might I ask why the coil and wires have to be replaced at 34,000 miles?
Exactly, totally unnecessary. The plugs, wires and coil packs are part of the PCM/ECU engine management system. You will get a check engine light and a code if there was a problem with them. Leave them alone and find an honest, independent shop to maintain your Subaru.
 

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Exactly, totally unnecessary. The plugs, wires and coil packs are part of the PCM/ECU engine management system. You will get a check engine light and a code if there was a problem with them. Leave them alone and find an honest, independent shop to maintain your Subaru.
What he said! ^

If a coil fails you will get a cylinder not firing ie your running on three vs 4 etc. It is about as obvious as getting plunked in the noggin by a sledg hammer when this happens. Subaru coil failure is extremely rare by the way. And yes engine light will go on when a coil fails.

My 2001 2.5 was on its original coils at 180,000 miles and ran GREAT. Plugs were changed at 100K and were found to be very clean. The wires were replaced at that point also. Engine performance and mileage did not change with the new wires and plugs at 100K.


My 2001 VW 1.8T Jetta had multiple coil failures - VW basically wrote the book on how not to source and put cheap coils in cars. When the coils started to fail the driver generally notices an odd hiccup with the engine as if it missed etc the engine light on the dash might flash or come on then go off etc. Then very soon after noticing the hiccup the coil will completely fail at which point engine light on the dash will come on and stay on and at low speeds the engine is clearly not running correctly given only three cylinders are firing etc. There is one coil per cylinder by the way.
 

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2013 2.5i Limited, Special Appearance Package, Brilliant Brown Pearl, Saddle Brown Leather, HK Audio, Moonroof, Navigation
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Even for all the other vehicles I have, wires and plugs are scheduled at 60k. At the bear minimum at 60k, I can see the plugs according to service schedules.
 

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2010 OBW limited 2.5 CVT
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The reason they are quoting you $200 is that they are listing each as a separate item and billing the book minimum of an hour for each operation(coil 1 hour/wires another hour).You get the joy of paying for the same hour twice. Even if you did need a coil (which I doubt), to remove it you have to remove the wires at the coil end. So the wire removal is already half done as part of another operation. They should not bill this way, but many do. Any decent shop would bundle connected operations under the same minimum. It should be one hour total for labor.
 

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2011 Outback 2.5i Premium, CVT, Steel Silver, all-weather package. Upgrades: Tweeter kit, BlueConnect, media hub, remote start, Curt 2" receiver hitch.
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A friend of mine has a Honda Civic... 1999 or 2000 model. At 25,000 miles, it started to misfire. I told her it seemed like bad plugs, and surely enough, the manual said they should be changed at 25,000 miles. Guys what happened at 50,000 miles... You could set a watch by it! I thought all cars were using 100,000 mile spark plugs by now. Way to go! Honda!
 

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I stood next to my mech while he did one H6 coil. Less than an hour, including removing belly-pan. Plug looked fine, so left untouched. Car has 100+Kmiles on it.

If coil DOES need replacing, you will get a check engine light and code first, and the car will run very unevenly as if someone poured water into your gas.
 

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'14 3.6R Outback
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Hi..thanks for the reply.

2009 Outback wagon, 2.5L gas, 5 speed manual, 34,000 miles
In the US I'd expect that to be covered under the power-train warranty which is 60 k miles or 7 years I think.

Might check into that too just to be sure.
 

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2013 OB 2.5 Moonroof, w/BU Camera pkg; Pzev LTD Ice Silver Metalic
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Just checked my factory warranty on 2013 OB

Exactly, totally unnecessary. The plugs, wires and coil packs are part of the PCM/ECU engine management system. You will get a check engine light and a code if there was a problem with them. Leave them alone and find an honest, independent shop to maintain your Subaru.

FWIW, I agree with the above. Since my OB is so new, I will stick it out with the SOA factory warranty. Like the poster above, I will then find a QUALIFIED independent Shop!!!

Also I just checked the warranty in the warranty booklet and the factory window sticker. I would imagine that this falls under the electrical system area (again somewhat nebulous) 3yr/36k. Not really knowing, It MIGHT be covered under the emissions section.

A big stretch, unless your vehicle will NOT PASS SMOG due to the problem.) Generally that one is state by state (usually 2yr/24k or Federal Emissions extended warranty 8yr/80k)...again, you would have to prove that the MAJOR component like PCM/ECU components are the culprit.
BTW

In the US, the 2013 OB Powertrain warranty is 5yrs/60k...(Info from the original factory window sticker.

GOOD LUCK in any case!
 

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Hello...my local Subaru dealership is quoting me over $200 in labour to repalce an ignition coil and wires. I'm not a mechanic but I understand that you remove the spark plug wires, remove the ignition coil (a couple of bolts) and do the reverse to install the new coil and cables. In my opinion, that should only take about a 1/2 hour. Thoughts/comments?
Why are they telling you the coil needs replacing? A coil should last the life of the car unless damaged by something other than standard vehicle use?

Do you have an engine light coming on? A coil either works or fails there is not inbetween. When a coil fails the spark plug does not fire and you get an engine light on the dash instantly. I have never had a coil failure in my subarus. VW yes pretty sure VW uses recycled junk yard coils from China. BTW there is one coil per spark plug.

Based on your post about what the dealer is telling you my BS scam job red flag just went to the top of the flag pole. I would start grilling the dealer with lots of questions given unless the car has a dash light on and is running very poorly which is what happens when a coil fails the DEALER is Full of SH-T.
 

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Why are they telling you the coil needs replacing?
I certainly can't answer the question, but this thread is from over a year ago and I would imagine that whatever the problem was, it most likely was dealt with back then, one way or another.

But it does demonstrate how much everyone here wants to help, even if it is somewhat belated!!!
 

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Wow. Sorry guys, I missed this was a year old thread!

:eek:
 

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my ride: 06 ll bean, 3.0 the wifes ride: 07 limited sedan 2.5
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Argg. $220. For a coil from PepBoys. $72 @ AutoZone but no one in Nashua NH has one.
 

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2005 OB Ltd
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I have a 2005 Outback 2.5 Limited PZEV with 117,800 miles. At 106,000 miles a mechanic put in new valve cover gaskets, plugs and NGK wires because of oil causing a misfire. My cat was ruined and at 115,000 I had the cat replaced under warranty (I didn't know it was covered till 15 years, 150,000 till a few months ago). Well my CEL just came on yesterday just as I heard a new noise under the hood.

I went to Autozone and got a code of 0304. I just pulled the boot to check for oil. It is clean. I put the boot back and started it up and I hear ticking and see sparks on the NGK wire leading to that 4th cylinder. Can a year and a half old wire crack????

Did it crack because of an ignition coil problem? Should I just replace the wires for now... and should I get the wires from Subaru instead of aftermarket?
 

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Is the wire visibly cracked?

Wire insulation can crack due various factors including excessive heat, chemicals, or flexing (the problem is well known in regard to the wires in the bundle between the car body and the rear hatch), and once the insulation itself develops a crack, high voltage has a path to jump through.

I guess it's also possible that a (defective) coil could generate far more high voltage than it's designed to provide, and if the voltage exceeds the rating of the insulation on the wires, that could lead to the high voltage "punching through" the insulation, although I think this would be quite rare.

Do you know what NGK wires were installed? (NGK wires come in different materials.) I wonder if the wire was defective, and if NGK might have an extended warranty (might depend on the type of wires.)

The 2005 non-turbo was equipped with two different coil/wire setups. Some have the coil on top of the intake manifold, with four spark plug wires of pretty well the same length going to each plug. Others have the coil mounted on the back of the right side of the intake manifold, with the wires to right side plugs being much shorter than the left side. The latter also have 90-degree fittings at their coil ends, whereas the former are straight.

If there is clear arcing from the wire, it (probably the set) should be replaced. NGK-brand wires can be found pretty well everywhere, including on line -- it's not necessary to go back to the dealer. Many here suggest NGK over others.

p.s., I also wonder if a defective plug could lead to a premature failure of a wire. If the plug is defective, it could force the high voltage to jump through the wire insulation.
 

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2005 OB Ltd
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Yes... I saw a slice where the spark is intermittently coming through... by the ribbed plastic sleeve.

I am pretty sure the wires are: NGK (55005) FX102, which are pretty cheap... only $34 on Amazon. I recall checking after I saw that the mechanic charged $60.

The coil pack sits atop the engine with the straights wire boots coming straight out.

Is buying expensive Magnacore wires, overkill?
 
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