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2005 outback 2.5 SOHC EJ251(4EAT)
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While I was changing ATF, I spilled some of the fluid.
After I drove several miles, I found out there are some smoke from engine room. I cleaned it from exhaust pipe to the dipstick pipe, and the smoke has been reduced. However, I still see the smoke when I open the hood after I drove several miles.
Is there any way or suggestion how to clean the spill ATF?
Please help me, I've never cleaned my engine room or suspension except some axle grease on my exhaust pipe.
 

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Meh.
I has wagons.
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12,372 Posts
It'll burn off eventually. :)

Some areas are a real pain to clean.
 

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2017 Outback 3.6 Touring, which replaced '05 Outback XT
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I had a good, independant Subaru shop change the ATF in my '05 recently. The mechanic advised that on Gen 3 models it is impossible to avoid a little spill and burn off. He was right, I could smell it, but it subsided after a couple of longer drives.
 

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(formerly) 03 H6 OBW , (presently) 06 WRX Sportwagon & 2021 Honda CR-V
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I think some people try to wrap vulnerable areas with aluminum foil before drain/fill but - I'd probably just let it burn off too.
 

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2005 outback 2.5 SOHC EJ251(4EAT)
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks guys

Thanks, everyone.

How about doing car-wash after applying some cleaner?
Or I watched a video cleaning engine room using high pressure water jet.
Maybe it is not a good idea. I found a writing about a problem caused by using degreaser/ cleaner.

http://www.subaruoutback.org/forums/64-detailing/8292-engine-bay-cleaning.html

Is it bad for environment than burning the fluid?
I'm just curious.
 

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(formerly) 03 H6 OBW , (presently) 06 WRX Sportwagon & 2021 Honda CR-V
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I've never had a problem using a self-serve type car wash and the 'engine cleaner' option on a car made after the eighties. You may want to be careful about directly spraying electrical connectors or areas that appear delicate. Any parts of an exhaust system should be fine.
 

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2005 outback 2.5 SOHC EJ251(4EAT)
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks Texan,

I've never had a problem using a self-serve type car wash and the 'engine cleaner' option on a car made after the eighties. You may want to be careful about directly spraying electrical connectors or areas that appear delicate. Any parts of an exhaust system should be fine.
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Does over filled engine oil or ATF possibly cause the smoke?
 

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(formerly) 03 H6 OBW , (presently) 06 WRX Sportwagon & 2021 Honda CR-V
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Does over filled engine oil or ATF possibly cause the smoke?
to double check your ATF fluid, take the dipstick out, wipe it off, set it safely aside.

Start you car, with foot on brake, move the shifter thru every gear, pausing for 5-10 seconds. put the shifter in park - leave the car running.

wait a further 3-5 minutes or so. Place the dipstick all the way in until seated, pull it back out but not 'fast'. Take a reading. I suggest turning the car off while adding fluid, then repeat the procedure to get a new reading.

If th car was cold when it was started, use the 'cold' hi-lo marks. If you just returned from driving the car and it's 'hot' (radiator fans running - temp gauge at normal) read the level at the HOT marks. The difference between hi-lo is very small - like a pint or half pint so, it's is kinda easy to overfill.

overfilling is not good, it put s pressure on the seals and can push fluid out the vent or even the dipstick/fill tube.

I use one of these to help with transmission and front diff fluids (still hard not to drip a little though)

 

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2005 outback 2.5 SOHC EJ251(4EAT)
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Sincerely thanks,,,

to double check your ATF fluid, take the dipstick out, wipe it off, set it safely aside.

Start you car, with foot on brake, move the shifter thru every gear, pausing for 5-10 seconds. put the shifter in park - leave the car running.

wait a further 3-5 minutes or so. Place the dipstick all the way in until seated, pull it back out but not 'fast'. Take a reading. I suggest turning the car off while adding fluid, then repeat the procedure to get a new reading.

If th car was cold when it was started, use the 'cold' hi-lo marks. If you just returned from driving the car and it's 'hot' (radiator fans running - temp gauge at normal) read the level at the HOT marks. The difference between hi-lo is very small - like a pint or half pint so, it's is kinda easy to overfill.
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Using the similar kind of funnel you had suggested, I spilled almost no oil. I used the funnel which comes with a measuring cup, and it was much cleaner and easier than using two funnel. Moreover, with your detailed instruction, my reading the dipstick is much better than before. Thanks for your generosity.
Sincerely,

P. S. In hot reading, I guess a lot of hills near my APT cause me hard to read dipstick right after I drove car. (so, maybe I need to wait some time until the oil is seated.)
Reading when it is cold is better to me, but I wonder that how much accurate cold reading is. I do not know anything about car, but I read a thread that the temperature of cold oil is 15~20c (65F). If so, how the temperature of fluid is colder than the temperature of periphery (about 80F) when engine is running? Maybe I miss understood something.
 

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(formerly) 03 H6 OBW , (presently) 06 WRX Sportwagon & 2021 Honda CR-V
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___________________________________________________________
Using the similar kind of funnel you had suggested, I spilled almost no oil. I used the funnel which comes with a measuring cup, and it was much cleaner and easier than using two funnel. Moreover, with your detailed instruction, my reading the dipstick is much better than before. Thanks for your generosity.
Sincerely,

P. S. In hot reading, I guess a lot of hills near my APT cause me hard to read dipstick right after I drove car. (so, maybe I need to wait some time until the oil is seated.)
Reading when it is cold is better to me, but I wonder that how much accurate cold reading is. I do not know anything about car, but I read a thread that the temperature of cold oil is 15~20c (65F). If so, how the temperature of fluid is colder than the temperature of periphery (about 80F) when engine is running? Maybe I miss understood something.

well, my guess would be a hot reading would be more accurate because the fluid is pumped through a coil in the radiator. And with the combined actions of the coolant thermostat and the radiator fans, coolant temperature stays 'approx' 200degs F. 'Cold' could be -35F to 115F I suppose (whatever the ambient air temp is) . No reason you couldn't double check it after driving it.
 

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2005 outback 2.5 SOHC EJ251(4EAT)
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the information

well, my guess would be a hot reading would be more accurate because the fluid is pumped through a coil in the radiator. And with the combined actions of the coolant thermostat and the radiator fans, coolant temperature stays 'approx' 200degs F. 'Cold' could be -35F to 115F I suppose (whatever the ambient air temp is) . No reason you couldn't double check it after driving it.
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In hot reading (over 10 mile driving), I approximately got the fluid line between L and F on the back of dipstick. On the front of the dipstick, I got way much higher oil line than F level. Considering the cold reading (between F and L-close to L), I think my hot reading is almost right. I guess the higher oil mark on the front dipstick is caused by the contact between L-shaped atf filler pipe and dipstick.
I found a great thread written by plain OM, and I think one who wants to change atf for the first time (like me) would want to read below.

http://www.subaruoutback.org/forums...-whats-difference-between-dipstick-marks.html

The main point is that one should fill atf less than the drained atf when the drained oil is hot (about 200F). As 1 Lucky Texan said, changing ATF when it is cold is a good idea and another option (maybe after the first hot drain).
 
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