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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just like the title says, I want to find and drop a 2.0L dohc with a turbo into my 1997 legacy outback ej25 dohc 5-speed. I've heard good stuff about the 2.0s with the thicker cylinder walls and such. I really want the turbo as well. I know I'll need a new downpipe. I was wondering about compatibility. I've had this car for almost 4 years and have put it through a lot. When I bought it for $350, i had to tow it home due to the rusted out rear brake lines. I spent the winter working on it making it safe and road worthy. The only thing more important than making it go is making it able to stop safely on its own. Lately, I've been having coolant loss issues and temperature fluctuations so it's time for new head gaskets. I'm thinking i would rather replace it with something else. Maybe, like the says, one of those jdm 2.0l doc's with a turbo. But the real question is, will it fit? And also what else will be needed to make it function correctly. If anyone has any light on this subject, I will be grateful. Thanks in advance and if there's anything else you need to know, feel free to ask. Thanks again.
 

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2005 Mazda 6 && 2007 Outback 3.0 LLBean, WGO
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Congrats on returning a rusted car to running order! I really like this generation, and wish I got started with mine earlier.

I don't know the details of most of the turbo engines, can you specify what year and engine model (e.g. EJ20X) you're eyeing? The JDM turbo for this generation (twin-turbo) is not a drop-in, and is a madhouse to plumb, so I hear.

Look over at www.legacygt.com where they're big on all things Legacy/Outback and turbo. A few people have swapped WRX drivetrains into these BD/BG bodies. Great project, but (1) the OEM 5-speed in your car, or the differentials, or the axles, or the decomposing rubber bushings, might not handle that much torque.
(2), You're probably looking at putting $2000 (just engine) into a car body that's worth less than the $1000.

Here's the 2nd gen "FAQ: Turbo?" from LegacyGT.com (2nd-gen Legacy is the 1st-gen Outback, same BD/BG body)


Just keep in mind the costs, and that if your car has seen enough rust that the brake lines died , then anything else is also fair game to rust or break down: swaybar mounts, rocker panels, fuel pipes, suspension bushings. Advice I've often seen is to try and max out the suspension and handling, as this is a surprisingly capable platform... just hard to bump the power much without a complete overhaul. A used EJ22 might be found for under $1000, and not need any ECU or wiring changes. That would give you at least $1000 left over for new bushings, struts or coils, swaybars, and some nice new tires or audio equipment.


OK, done with the raining! What all did you do over the winter? How's it drive now? Any pictures to share with us? We like pictures!
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
my memory wasnt serving me correctly... sorry. i purchased it in march, still kind of wintery. there was snow on the ground. the rear brake lines were replaced and stuffed up between the gas tank and underbody. then, new rotors and ceramic pads all around. i think a couple new calipers were needed too. since that last post i actually ended up doing the head gaskets, timing belt and all components and the waterpump. thanks to covid, nobody says that, i was getting "hazard pay" for a while and was able to save up to get all the parts. then all i needed was time and the 4th of july extended weekend was put to good use. however, since then i fixed a few oil leaks on the valve covers, disrupting the balance and now the back of the block is leaking. ive pulled the engine twice and dropped the tranny once to get at it. did the rear main seal...4 times, once knocking it in too far and then pulling it again thinking i needed a sleeve ... ugh. but it stopped leaking and now, using a borescope, saw the oil separator plate is leaking. i used red rtv originally and now know that i needed good ol fujibond. the wrist pin access panels o ring was replaced with a regular o ring which was all i had at the time. i was going to redo that when i dropped the tranny but the screw heads stripped and i couldnt get any umph behind the impact screwdriver to knock it loose. also with dropping the tranny i had the luck of dealing with a welded nut coming loose that was holding the carrier bearing to the car. also, sloppy shifter was taken care of when that went down... now that its january in ohio, and i caught a little frostbite in my toes, i want to avoid doing too much until it warms back up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks for introducing me to another subaru site... but I'm not sure how it would h.... oh wait. Going back to putting in the jdm twin turbo.... if I get a fix core welder, would I be able to put the drivers side turbo where the washer reservoir is? Then move the washer reservoir to where the air box is since the air box would be modified and plumbing moved anyway? This is only speculation right now. I will have to move closer to my work to somewhere with a garage (I'd settle for just a garage;). Then, would be able to park her long enough to do it right and just ride my bike back and forth to work. But.. those are just dreams. I've been driving loaded down with an engine hoist and a few more hundred pounds of tools so now my rear struts are shot, fun times. It snowed quite a bit a few weeks ago and we had a white christmas in Ohio and everybody with pretend cars, two wheel drive, were driving all slow. With my rear end almost firmly anchored to the ground and with the sweet, sweet nectar of all wheel drive; I was going like there wasnt a snowflake around. There was about 4"-6", btw.
 

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Common options:
#1: NA/T (non-aspirated with turbo added) #2: Full swap, or #3: Combo

#1 is covered many (many) times online and is adding a turbo to your existing engine and running low-boost <8PSI. Search NA-T or Na/T Subaru , etc. There's even a FB group.

#2 is usually taking a WRX or similar, swapping the COMPLETE engine harness and ECU/ECM, engine and transmission, etc.

#3 is installing a turbo engine or using your original, wiring in a stand-alone EM (engine management) and tuning for your specific modifications (mods).

I've recommend against the EJ20TT (twin turbo). It's definitely a 'neat' engine but getting parts is difficult. And as it was built for a RH drive car, it'll be a PITA to install in your LH drive OB.

I'd start reading up on other sites (this site is good for OBs, but others cater more to those w/the mod-bug).

Remember, your EJ25D was used in the '98 Forester and '98 Impreza RS, so sites related tot those models will also yield tons of info.

Lastly, the EJ-series of engines are usually interchangeable among many different models. As noted, the EJ25D was in 3 different models, which included wagons and sedans. One key issue is the Phase 1 vs Phase 2 - READ THIS - for clarification. Subaru changed-up many of the electronics, sensors, wiring around 1999....this doesn't include the newer FB-series stuff around 2011. That's not my forte (at all).
 
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