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Has anyone tried to extract better stopping/shorter stopping distance in their Outback? I sold my 16' Mustang GT and bought the 2019 Outback 3.6R and so far almost after 7,000 Miles I still feel I have more events where I had to stand on the brakes to come to a sudden halt. Often happens if I need to quickly reduce speed and come to a complete stop find myself stopping almost too close to comfort. I don't know if I am being paranoid since I came from the Mustang GT's brembo brakes or does most owners face this ? After reading through several threads it seems brake upgrade isn't a viable option.

So does swapping to better tires enhance braking performance? other than road noise, I don't have a problem with the OEM Bridgestone, won't get a lot of snow in the area I live so thats not a top concern while looking for tires. I love the car so much and its engine is a total gem, feel the only sore point of this car are the brakes or may be I don't know how to extract best performance from them?
 

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If you're not braking at impending lockup or ABS activation, traction is not the limiting factor yet. The Brembos allowed better brake modulation which gives more confidence in the brakes but I'd wager stopping distances are not grossly different. Yes, the mustang will stop shorter (I sure hope it does), and there will be moments when the extra 15-20' is the difference between a close call and contact.
 

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The stock front brake rotor on the outback is only 12.4” vs stock mustang gt brembo 13.9” diameter. Big difference in surface area. Stock front wrx Sti brembo rotor is only 12.8”. Im not sure if swapping in the Sti front brake is going to help you much in term of braking since you’re just gaining .4” diameter.
I’m not sure what the ascent front brake diameter is...it’s definitely worth a look.

Putting in summer and wider width tires certainly helps in braking.

Look into a more aggressive brake pads as well.

Lastly maybe you just have to get used to it.
 

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Hey guys I did a quick search on here and couldnt seem to find anything. I Already know that the 2015+ OB is 5x114.3 so newer STi rotors should work. My question is has anyone attempted the caliper install on an OB? Thanks in advance. P.S. I rather not fill this thread with all the "why do you want STi brakes comments" so please keep information constructive.

Cheers!
 

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Tires are probably the biggest factor in stopping distance assuming you have properly functioning brakes. Different pads can help with the pedal feel.
My wife's 19 Outback stops well when needed, but pedal feel isn't the most inspiring. Installing some performance oriented pads will likely improve feel and modulation, but unless you do a big brake/STi swap you aren't going to get the same level of pedal feel as the outback uses sliding pin calipers.


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I find the brakes to have poor feel too, requiring more pedal input than a typical car. I've tried some different pads and while I can tell a difference, it's not what I need/want. I'm due for a fluid flush and am planning to try a different set of pads that I have had good luck with. Keeping my fingers crossed.
 

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I don't think the tires have anything to do with braking. The tires have a lot to do with traction but traction has nothing to do with braking either. I find it unusual that you have to stand on the pedal to stop. The brakes in Outback's are typically very sensitive and require very little force. You are probably driving it like the way you drove the Mustang, which is a completely different vehicle.
 

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2019 Subaru Outback 3.6R Touring
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I was going to say much what @zoulas said: I'm experiencing sort of the same thing but I'm coming from a 2-door Honda Civic and am having to get used to a larger car. This means there's more mass to deal with while braking but also while taking corners. In the first month I've had to learn, "Nope... Can't take that curve like I used to.. Slow it down.." (same with braking)
 

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I was going to say much what @zoulas said: I'm experiencing sort of the same thing but I'm coming from a 2-door Honda Civic and am having to get used to a larger car. This means there's more mass to deal with while braking but also while taking corners. In the first month I've had to learn, "Nope... Can't take that curve like I used to.. Slow it down.." (same with braking)
You just need a 125mm rear sway bar and a good set of driving gloves. Your OB will handle like a Formula 1 car..... :)
 

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LOL, let's remember, you are now driving an Outback. But, IMO, one would have to be driving extremely aggressively to be in such fear of the Outback's brakes. And what's all this talk about tires? As was mentioned, unless you're getting into long bursts of ABS, the tires are completely irrelevant.
 

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Brucey
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I just installed new pads since mine were low and was impressed with the stopping distance when breaking them in. I was actually getting ABS on dry sunny pavement.

I've also looked into Ascent brakes when the time comes and believe they will bolt on however it's questionable if they will clear 17 inch wheels.

I know STI Brembo calipers will bolt on if you want to really spend some money.

All that said, it's still just an Outback.
 

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For anyone saying tires do not affect stopping distance, you are 100% incorrect. As I stated before, tires make a huge difference. My WRX takes noticably longer to stop running my winter tires than the summer tires, all while keeping brake components exactly the same. The only difference is the tires. Granted, in temperatures below freezing that reverses and the winter tires stop sooner than the summer performance tires.

Check out this article for some information on why that is with actual math formulas. Why Braking Is All About Tires

Again, this is an outback, and while one tire may reduce stopping distance by a couple to several feet, what most of us are talking about is actually pedal feel, or how the pedal feels under your foot and how far you have to push the pedal. New fluid, and different pads, even stainless brake lines, will improve pedal feel, but you are never going to achieve the pedal feel you get from a fixed system like Brembos in a sliding caliper system like the Outback has.


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If you put Ascent brakes on an Outback do you get deacent braking?
 

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If you put Ascent brakes on an Outback do you get deacent braking?
This is probably similar to when I installed LGT brakes on my old 05 OBXT. Pedal feel was improved, but I doubt actual stopping distance changed much. It sure felt better though. Only downside was I couldn't run 16" or smaller wheels. I had to stick with 17"


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This is probably similar to when I installed LGT brakes on my old 05 OBXT. Pedal feel was improved, but I doubt actual stopping distance changed much. It sure felt better though. Only downside was I couldn't run 16" or smaller wheels. I had to stick with 17"


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What did you swap out - master cylinder, calipers, rotors, or all?
 

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For anyone saying tires do not affect stopping distance, you are 100% incorrect...
But we qualified that statement to exclude situations in which the ABS system is active. If the wheels are locked or ABS is active then, obviously, the tires are a major factor. Your link doesn't appear to say anything different.
While we don't know for certain, my impression is that the OP doesn't like the feel of the brakes - a relatively common complaint. Tires will not improve brake feel.
 

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Something to keep in mind is that the unsprung weight of Ascent calipers and rotors will be higher. One of the reasons I chose the Brembo calipers is because the weight of those calipers is lighter than the stock Outback caliper. So the increase weight of the larger STI rotors is offset by the lighter caliper.

If you put Ascent brakes on an Outback do you get deacent braking?
 

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Something to keep in mind is that the unsprung weight of Ascent calipers and rotors will be higher. One of the reasons I chose the Brembo calipers is because the weight of those calipers is lighter than the stock Outback caliper. So the increase weight of the larger STI rotors is offset by the lighter caliper.
Good point.
 

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Assuming the ABS is not kicking in (traction/loss via tires on the road), the only difference a tire swap might make would be the weight of the tires....
 
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