Subaru Outback Forums banner

1 - 20 of 116 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We are pretty set on buying an Outback but wanted to check out the RAV4, of course Toyota sales person wanted to talk down the Subaru. this is where my questions come from. He told me at 80k miles I would have to replace the timing chain, and then again at 160k. I can’t find any info searching google if this is true or not so asking you all of it is true or not?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,320 Posts
Having owned an OB, I would take a new Rav4 over the OB but the Toyota sales person was incorrect about the timing chain replacement. Lots of other negatives to choose from but timing chains are not one of them.
 

·
Registered
20 Outback Premium
Joined
·
458 Posts
I'm relatively new to Subaru, but have "heard" they require more maintenance than other brands. I just checked their recommended maintenance through 137,500 miles, no mention of a timing chain, the only thing that seemed more frequent than other manufacturers was spark plugs every 60K miles.
 

·
Registered
2017 2.5i Premium Lapis Blue
Joined
·
3,702 Posts
The Rav 4 never stayed on my list very long because of the low towing capacity. But in reality I wouldn't want to tow the Outback's maximum towing capacity with the base engine. The Rav 4 always seemed to have a lot less interior space with the seats folded down which is how I use my Outback the majority of the time. I haven't seen a Rav 4 since it was updated so I'm not sure if the size has changed significantly. Either one is probably a good choice but at least with the previous generation of both it wasn't a tough choice for me to go with my Outback.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,364 Posts
The choice between the two vehicles really comes down to how you will use it and what expectations you have.

The Subaru will be better in inclement weather, unpaved or deteriorated roads, carry more cargo, and probably have better structural integrity in an accident.

Here's a comparison between a ton of AWD SUV's and you will see that the Subaru is distinctly a cut above:


 

·
Registered
2008 OB Limited 2.5i, Portland OR USA
Joined
·
5,384 Posts
I would stay away from that Toyota salesman, as there is no factual basis for the statements he made.

I wouldn't necessarily stay away from the Rav4, though. It has some advantages, some disadvantages. Depends on what you want; do your research and make your call based on the facts, not upon FUD.
 

·
Premium Member
2016 Outback 3.6R Limited w/ EyeSight
Joined
·
257 Posts
What model years are you looking at?

I only ask because I have a 2016 Outback and the Mrs. has a 2015 Rav4 XLE.

Both Vehicles have been mechanically sound. No surprises, just routine maintenance. The Toyota Care is an advantage over Subaru in my area.

Overall, they are similar driving around town. I don't really care for the Rav4 on a personal taste level. It has that "cheesy FWD / Toyota Corolla" feeling I just can't shake. LOL. Like I'm in a rental or granny's car. The AWD systems are different as others have mentioned.

Now, if it were both 2020's I'd have no opinion. I do like the looks of the latest gen Rav4 though.
 

·
Registered
2010 2.5 CVT Premium
Joined
·
1,085 Posts
Lol.
If the owner of a dealership put out a 'cuss jar' but had the sales force put in $1 every time they told an untruth, they might make as much money as they would selling cars!

from the limited exposure I've had with sales reps, most of them can hardly keep info and tech data straight on their own brand, much less competing brands.
 

·
SubaruOutback.org Founder
2018 Outbacks, Grey Premium & Silver Limited
Joined
·
4,781 Posts
We are pretty set on buying an Outback but wanted to check out the RAV4, of course Toyota sales person wanted to talk down the Subaru. this is where my questions come from. He told me at 80k miles I would have to replace the timing chain, and then again at 160k. I can’t find any info searching google if this is true or not so asking you all of it is true or not?
Interesting, check out this other thread about another Toyota salesman saying similar misinformed things. Perhaps you both ran into the same one???


And for what it is worth I would rather consider a CR-V Hybrid if you are comparing RAV4 vs. Subaru and do not want to go with an Outback or Forester.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,320 Posts
Lol.
If the owner of a dealership put out a 'cuss jar' but had the sales force put in $1 every time they told an untruth, they might make as much money as they would selling cars!

from the limited exposure I've had with sales reps, most of them can hardly keep info and tech data straight on their own brand, much less competing brands.
LOL +1, like no Subaru salesman has ever lied to a customer....................
 

·
Registered
2011 Outback Limited 2.5i/2018 Crosstrek limited
Joined
·
4,546 Posts
Buy the Subaru! We bought a RAV new in 2016...within 6 months of purchase I couldn’t wait to trade it. We had to wait until summer of ‘18 just to get enough to pay the lien on the car...we bought a new crosstrek. I did not like the slip and grip AWD system in heavy snow or slippery conditions. There were other aspects of the car we didn’t like but that was the main one. After having three Subaru’s I wanted to put our $$$ into something I could depend on.

Buy the Subaru.
 

·
Registered
2017 2.5i Premium Lapis Blue
Joined
·
3,702 Posts
I sure some have lied to customers.

But the Toyota salesman was caught at it.
Possibly. But I've seen enough around here to know that even Subaru salespeople themselves are often less than informed about their own products. It could be that the Toyota salesman was still going off of old information and isn't aware of changes that have been made. Who knows? Maybe he was previously a Subaru salesman.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
I would not buy another vehicle with a CVT. They are expensive to replace. My 2012 lasted about 83K and was recently replaced under the 10yr./100K warranty extension. If I had to pay for it myself it would have been $9,000. I was told that the internals have not been upgraded, at least for my year. So if I keep this car, the next CVT will be on me. I have no idea if newer model Subaru CVT's have been re-designed to last longer and I'm not going to find out. The technology just does not seem mature to me. If the cost of replacement were reasonable, I'd reconsider because I like the car. I like how it runs and drives, it's great in the snow and it is comfortable. I wish Subaru would ditch the CVT and put a 6 speed automatic in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,364 Posts
I would not buy another vehicle with a CVT. They are expensive to replace. My 2012 lasted about 83K and was recently replaced under the 10yr./100K warranty extension.
Seems like your CVT had a shorter than average life, but there's always variation. Could you share what failed in your CVT and whether or not the fluid was ever changed prior to the failure? There's been long debate threads about whether to change the CVT fluid or not, and I'm wondering if your experience can add a data point, and whether you did any towing with the Outback?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,324 Posts
I'm relatively new to Subaru, but have "heard" they require more maintenance than other brands. I just checked their recommended maintenance through 137,500 miles, no mention of a timing chain, the only thing that seemed more frequent than other manufacturers was spark plugs every 60K miles.
I have owned the 2017 outback. Never gave me a problem but I have also heard that they are less reliable than Toyota. I bought Outback because it had a better ride quality, longer wheelbase and bigger storage than Rav4.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2012 Outback Ltd 3.6r
Joined
·
438 Posts
The current Gen RAV4 while a looker IMHO, has no headroom for those over 6 foot tall, at 6'2" with a large build, I'm not close to fitting into one. (Head well into sunroof, and touching the glass). Rear seat rock hard, and a less compliant/noisier ride.

My $0.02, having looked at one. I like my '12 better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Seems like your CVT had a shorter than average life, but there's always variation. Could you share what failed in your CVT and whether or not the fluid was ever changed prior to the failure? There's been long debate threads about whether to change the CVT fluid or not, and I'm wondering if your experience can add a data point, and whether you did any towing with the Outback?
I bought the car with about 60K on it, so I don't know if the CVT fluid had been changed but I doubt it. As for for towing, I have not but who knows about the first owner. The CVT failure was belt slippage. It would happen only between 60-65mph with very little load on the engine. I'd have to be on the highway, get out of the gas and back on very gently in that speed range and it would squeal for about a second and you could feel a very slight jerk as the belt caught again. If the radio were on you might not notice it. I probably could have driven it quite a while before it failed completely. I've been following the fluid debate and it seems a no brainer to me. If I keep the car, I'll be changing at 30K. It can't hurt and if it fixes the problem it's cheap insurance.
 
1 - 20 of 116 Posts
Top