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Discussion Starter #1
I was in a collision where the other vehicle damaged the sidewall of a single tire beyond repair. However, their insurnace estimate only wants to replace one tire. They claimed Subaru recommends but does not require the same tire pattern and wear/diameter. Of course none of the tire shops will only do a single tire on a suabru for that reason. Has anyone has success convincing insurance otherwise?

The current tires are a matching set. They have 30k miles and are rated for 80k so the diameters definitely won't match up.
 

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Everything I've read says all tires must be replaced at the same time and routinely rotated to ensure even wear of all tires. Which made me wonder, what if I have a flat? Can I use my spare? On older models, you can remove a fuse which converts to front wheel drive but to my knowledge, the Gen 3 on up doesn't have that option.

You'll probably need to get some verification from a reliable source on replacement of the other tires.
 

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I replaced a single tire with around 5K miles on the odometer. I felt that the other tires were not worn enough to be of consequence.

Insurance is only responsible to "make you whole"... oftentimes you need to spend some money also.

For example, when tree fell on my house... sure Insurance covers a lot of the repairs... but I had some out-of-pocket expenses which should be done while the house is torn apart for repairs.
 

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Brucey is a Tool of the Devil !
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you could have a large tire shop shave the new tire down to match what you got.

discount tire direct and tire rack also do it and ship you the tire for a local garage to install.

edit: @Discount Tire about how much does this service cost ? (this thread exists here many times,...with the subaru "all tires the same mantra")
 

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Brucey is a Tool of the Devil !
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Convincing the insurance to shave your tire sounds like the best option. Followed by doing it yourself.
you might want to rephrase that.

like the subaru owner paying for the shaving even if the insurance company knows or cares of such a endeavor,

vs. ...doing the subaru owner shaving as a DIY.
 

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Has anyone actually measured the tires tread depth to see how close you are to the Subaru tolerance level?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Has anyone actually measured the tires tread depth to see how close you are to the Subaru tolerance level?
You measure circumference actually. The difference should be within .25 inches. It'll be out of spec for sure.

Shaving might work, but the current tires are no longer made.
 

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I was just talking about this to someone else somewhere else.

Subaru supplies their vehicles from the factory with a spare tire that is 3% difference in size.

Based on the factory sized tire versus the factory sized spare at no point during the tread life of the AT tires should tread depth difference exceed 3%. In fact it's more like half that.

(13/32" brand new on that tire - 2/32" legally end of life = 11/32". 11/32" On a Tire with a Diameter of 29.5" is a difference of around a 1.4% circumference difference.)

I say 3% because that happens to be the size difference between the Subaru factory sized tires (225/65/17) and the factory sized spare (155/80/17) so I am comfortable running it since the newer AWD systems don't require the FWD fuse to be installed and seem to be able to compensate for differences in circumference of at least 3% based on OEM specifications.

Can someone smarter than me check my math? @Richard Pare @Fibber2

If my math is correct why is it different than the 4/32" quoted within acceptable limits?
 

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11/32 (.343") difference in tread depth is actually .687" diametrically - the reduction of the tread depth is on both sides of the diameter.

On the 29.5" diameter tire as an example, the difference in diameter between new and worn down 11/32 is 2.3%, still below the 3% between a new road tire and the temporary spare.

I was just talking about this to someone else somewhere else.

Subaru supplies their vehicles from the factory with a spare tire that is 3% difference in size.

Based on the factory sized tire versus the factory sized spare at no point during the tread life of the AT tires should tread depth difference exceed 3%. In fact it's more like half that.

(13/32" brand new on that tire - 2/32" legally end of life = 11/32". 11/32" On a Tire with a Diameter of 29.5" is a difference of around a 1.4% circumference difference.)

I say 3% because that happens to be the size difference between the Subaru factory sized tires (225/65/17) and the factory sized spare (155/80/17) so I am comfortable running it since the newer AWD systems don't require the FWD fuse to be installed and seem to be able to compensate for differences in circumference of at least 3% based on OEM specifications.

Can someone smarter than me check my math?

If my math is correct why is it different than the 4/32" quoted within acceptable limits?
 

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you could have a large tire shop shave the new tire down to match what you got.

discount tire direct and tire rack also do it and ship you the tire for a local garage to install.

edit: @Discount Tire about how much does this service cost ? (this thread exists here many times,...with the subaru "all tires the same mantra")
We don't actually offer this service because it "technically" voids the manufacturer warranty, but it can be done for around $30.00 depending on the tire size.

Also, we follow industry standard when it comes to replacement tires on AWD platforms. It's recommended to replace all 4 ties unless specific criteria/guidelines are stated by the vehicle manufacturer in the owners manual.
 

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You measure circumference actually. The difference should be within .25 inches. It'll be out of spec for sure.

Shaving might work, but the current tires are no longer made.
Unless the tires are different sizes to begin with, tread depth difference is a perfectly acceptable measurement. Some use 2/32" left to right and 3/32" front to back. Others like to use 2/32" difference in any direction.
 

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For reference, we had a 1991 Subaru Legacy Wagon L AWD that we purchased new. An 18 wheeler took a sharp turn and went diagonally over the hood of our wagon when we were at a stop sign. This happened in Harrisburg, PA in 1993 when the car had about 35K+ miles. The repair estimate was close to $8K. They did not want to replace the seat belts including the automatic retractable shoulder seat belts in the front. I was intimately familiar with my owners manual and sent them copies of pages from it - the owners manual clearly stated that after an accident, the seat belts should be replaced. Once they verified it, they had no choice but to add that to the estimate. The repair estimate mushroomed to above $9K and they decided to total the car.

Point is, do you have written official Subaru documentation that includes strict tire tolerance specifications and can show that with one tire replaced, the tolerances will be out of specification? If so, present it to your insurance company and see where it leads.
 

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Another option is to call wreck yards, and see if they have a similar mileage vehicle. You may be close to what you need for a single tire.
 

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A used tire might do the trick. I am assuming the Google can find a tire that matches. Insurance might pay for that (the tire, shipping, and mounting), or they might simply hand you a check for the cost of a single new tire whichever is lower.


Or pony up for three new ones. You got roughly 50% life out of your current set.

You might be able to get your own insurance co to go after the other guy's insurance co to get a reimbursement, even if it's prorated, on 3 additional tires.
 

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Perhaps a negotiation is possible. Why not offer to the insurance adjuster to replace all four tires with similar quality tires, with them giving you a credit toward their purchase that is equal to the remaining 50k service life of the three tires that weren't damaged in the accident (about 5/8 the cost of three tires), and you absorbing the 30k you've put on them (about 3/8 the cost of three tires)?

By my accounting, they pay for 23/32, you pay for 9/32, assuming the simple wear model based on miles accumulated and tire warranty. That's a pretty good deal to get your tire replacement interval reset to 80k miles.

Four negotiation points would support doing this:

1. If no one will shave a tire to match circumference, it leaves your car out of spec.
2. But since the original tires are no longer available, and it's not recommended to mix tires even when they are similar in circumference, there's still a problem with shaving.
3. You would be absorbing the cost of the 30k miles on the three good tires, meaning you don't get any "betterment".
4. They owe you the fourth tire at full cost to make you whole on the one that was damaged, so that isn't included in this calculation.
 

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Does TireRack shave tires?
 

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I was just talking about this to someone else somewhere else.

Subaru supplies their vehicles from the factory with a spare tire that is 3% difference in size.
This handy website says the difference in diameter (and, thus, circumference) is 6%.


Based on the factory sized tire versus the factory sized spare at no point during the tread life of the AT tires should tread depth difference exceed 3%. In fact it's more like half that.

(13/32" brand new on that tire - 2/32" legally end of life = 11/32". 11/32" On a Tire with a Diameter of 29.5" is a difference of around a 1.4% circumference difference.)
Nominal diameter of a 225/65R17 tire is 28.5" according to the tire size website. As someone noted, 11/32" tread wear (1/4" + 3/32") reduces the radius, not diameter, by that amount, from 14 1/4" (14.25") to 13 29/32" (13.90625"), about 2.4%.

I say 3% because that happens to be the size difference between the Subaru factory sized tires (225/65/17) and the factory sized spare (155/80/17) so I am comfortable running it since the newer AWD systems don't require the FWD fuse to be installed and seem to be able to compensate for differences in circumference of at least 3% based on OEM specifications.

Can someone check my math? @Richard Pare @Fibber2

If my math is correct why is it different than the 4/32" quoted within acceptable limits?
See above.

The spare is intended for temporary use at limited speed for a limited distance. Long distances and high speed with mismatched tires is different, even if the mismatch is much less.
 

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