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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Man, pretty pissed. I just got my first OB and wasn't told the specifics of the break in period. I now have 700 miles on my 2012 and I used the cruise control pretty often. The OB does have CVT, but did I screw up the potential longevity of my engine? :mad:
 

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2016 Outback 2.5i Premium w/nav/eye
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Man, pretty pissed. I just got my first OB and wasn't told the specifics of the break in period. I now have 700 miles on my 2012 and I used the cruise control pretty often. The OB does have CVT, but did I screw up the potential longevity of my engine? :mad:
yup, your only going to get about 100k out of her. j/k don't sweat it is harmed in no way whatsoever.
 

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'14 3.6R Outback
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Odds are the lot boys do more damage than you could have possibly done. The engines are fairly well broken in before we get them.

The manual has some "best bet" info that while good, is not critical. Follow the maintenance schedule though as that is the important part.
 

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2012 limited, white, no moonroof or nav
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As long as you did not drive exclusively on flat land, Use of the CC actually works pretty well for break-in. Unlike manual or traditional auto trans vehicles, the CVT actually changes RPM with load.
As long as you do not hammer it during break-in, you should not have any issues. I do believe it is a good idea, when the 1k break-in is done, to give the motor some full throttle runs. This will help to finish bringing the rings in, if they haven't seated completely. (It will also help identify if there are any engine problems in this range and mode). These runs do not have to be extended, (In fact, the first couple probably should not exceed a few seconds), a few blasts up the on ramp at WOT with take care of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
As long as you did not drive exclusively on flat land, Use of the CC actually works pretty well for break-in. Unlike manual or traditional auto trans vehicles, the CVT actually changes RPM with load.
As long as you do not hammer it during break-in, you should not have any issues. I do believe it is a good idea, when the 1k break-in is done, to give the motor some full throttle runs. This will help to finish bringing the rings in, if they haven't seated completely. (It will also help identify if there are any engine problems in this range and mode). These runs do not have to be extended, (In fact, the first couple probably should not exceed a few seconds), a few blasts up the on ramp at WOT with take care of it.
Well I live in FL so it is pretty flat. But I think there are enough slight hills to help it out. I don't think I hammered it, might have got to 4k RPM once or twice but I've been driving like grandpa to get good gas mileage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Odds are the lot boys do more damage than you could have possibly done. The engines are fairly well broken in before we get them.

The manual has some "best bet" info that while good, is not critical. Follow the maintenance schedule though as that is the important part.

that's what I figured but we got it with 16miles on the car.
 

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17 miles for me. Unless you were driving across Kansas without changing speeds, I bet the RPM varied some and that's the key more than the speed, RPM as others noted. Either way, I wouldn't worry too much.

I'm surprised the dealer didn't mention this during the information exchange before you drove off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
17 miles for me. Unless you were driving across Kansas without changing speeds, I bet the RPM varied some and that's the key more than the speed, RPM as others noted. Either way, I wouldn't worry too much.

I'm surprised the dealer didn't mention this during the information exchange before you drove off.
Yeah pretty miffed at the dealer for that one.
 

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Meh.
I has wagons.
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Not to sound like a jerk, but the break in info is in the Owner's Manual.
 

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2012 Subaru Outback 2.5i Limited
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In addition to being in the manual, is this your first new car??

But, like above, don't worry about it!! Just enjoy your new car!!!!!!!!
 

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2011 Outback 3.6R Limited--Sky Blue Metallic
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Not to sound like a jerk, but the break in info is in the Owner's Manual.
That was the first thing that I thought of, also.

Yes, it would be nice to be told everything possible about your car (even if it is unlikely that anyone is going to remember all of it), but the mfr has provided a very detailed manual and the owner is responsible for reading it.

I can't speak for anyone else, but whenever I buy a new car, on the first night of ownership I read the sections in the manual pertaining to break-in, controls, gauges, and warning lights. In other words, I read about the topics that are of immediate importance...immediately. Then, over the next couple of weeks, I try to wend my way through the entire manual, with special attention to things like tire changing and maintenance.

Some manuals are incredibly tedious. For instance, I recall that one of my cars from the distant past had 8 pages in its manual on how to put your seatbelts on! :gasp: That type of minutia can be glossed over, but anyone who is really interested in the safe and economical operation of his car will make it his business to read the manual.
 

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2012 outback limited
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Use to believe in the printed matter, but then seeing in person at a factory final testing how an engine was reved up to red line; I do not worry. Agree the steady RPM does tend to seat the rings and wall only a certian area, and likely the reason for "Printed advice". Cvt is always changing. I believe in run like **** the minute you own it. Just avoid steady rpm runs. Worse case possible, engine rings do not wear in at best, so may use oil at 100k verse 140k ? (wild guess)
 

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I use the manual mode during the break in to vary RPMs more. I've noticed the paddle shifters are a bit quicker and almost fun in the 13 vs the 11 legacy I had
 

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2012 Outback 2.5i Limited
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Just before I hit 1K, I noticed the engine was much smoother sounding when raced up past 4,000 rpms.
 

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While not exactly the same engine, the Mustang Cobra dohc engines (rebuilds for performance) are broken in on the dyno with top rpm run ups. By the third run, the rings are totally broken in/sealed. So, probably, the factory drivers actually break in the engine for you. All current generation engines use low-pressure rings, which are inherently more difficult to seal. I have two such cars, have done nothing unusual for breaking them in, and neither burn a drop of oil. The cobra has 70,000 on it and the Chevy TB has 136,000 on it. BTW, the Chevy TB will, at this point, be replaced by an OB within 18 months. We need wither 4WD or a GOOD AWD where we live here in WV and many are very satisfied with an OB or Forester - we need a 6 cyl. for passing slow moving trucks on the mountain roads here.
 

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2017 Outback 2.5i Limited, EyeSight & Nav.
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Does your mom still pack your lunch for you and cut the crusts off, too? Seriously, no sympathy here. Read the owner's manual!
 
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