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2010 Subaru Outback
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I'm in my mid-30s and have never been exposed to a manual transmission. I've searched the Denver, Colorado area for training and haven't found anything.

Is there anyone in the area that would be willing to volunteer their time and car to teach me the basics? I'd be happy to trade a lunch or six-pack for your effort.

I'm a good driver. 2010 Outback owner.

Cheers,
Aaron
 

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(formerly) 03 H6 OBW , (presently) 06 WRX Sportwagon & 2021 Honda CR-V
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18,754 Posts
you might look for an SCCA chapter near you. Someone in the club might help you out.

is there a track near Denver that offers HPDEs ? (high performance driving experience) they might have a class they could design for you.

check with al your relatives (older especially) and even you friends relatives.
 

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2019 2.5i Limited Forester (hers) (4th Subie), 2014 Impreza Premium (mine)(#5)
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2,292 Posts
You'll probably be able to find someone that can teach you far more easily than you will be able to find a car with a manual transmission.
Funny thing is, I taught someone the basics of how to drive a manual in about 15 minutes just doing a test drive.

The rest of it is just practice on getting the foot / hand coordination.
 

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3,218 Posts
Hello,

I'm in my mid-30s and have never been exposed to a manual transmission. I've searched the Denver, Colorado area for training and haven't found anything.

Is there anyone in the area that would be willing to volunteer their time and car to teach me the basics? I'd be happy to trade a lunch or six-pack for your effort.

I'm a good driver. 2010 Outback owner.

Cheers,
Aaron
Hi,

I learned on a manual when I first started driving years ago. It's fun, more engaging experience. Acquired skill set.

When I was looking to brush up on my skills I called around the nearby towns until I found one or two driving schools nearby that offered manual still, and then went with the one with the newer of the two vehicles. I had also looked for rental car places that offered a stick, but the only thing I could find were expensive exotic clubs. Not what I was looking for.

The thing you need to focus on is the coordination and fine motor skill of your left foot. My biggest mistake was that I was clutching out too quickly after I felt the clutch grab (this is called the friction point) which results in bucking. I never stalled because I would just clutch in again to keep the motor going...

The hardest part is getting going from a stop. You'll have to learn the delicate, coordinated dance of "clutch out slowly with left foot while adding throttle with right foot"... The newer Subarus have hill holders, so going from a stop on a hill is less of a "drama" than it used to be in the '90 Camry I learned in...

Good luck!

Side note: The dilemma associated with the manuals is that they tend to only be offered in the "lower" trims unless you're talking about a WRX/STI... It's a pretty big tradeoff to be without some of the modern conveniences in the Limited & Touring Trims and especially without EyeSight. You'll also have lower gas mileage compared to the CVT as well.
 

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On the Super Mod Squad
2002 3.0 VDC Wag + 2018 2.5 Leg Ltd
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27,163 Posts
I can certainly teach you. Just about every dang car I owned until I was 35 was a 3 pedler.

One problem...I only have 5EATs. So...No car.

:1pat:
don't worry.

that 3rd wife you are going to meet for the first time at the rocky mountain subaru fest, will have a 10 car garage with plenty of room for Francine, and Cherry, ...they can park next to: a mint 1996 acura NSX, and a 95 Nissan 300Z TT, both with 5 speed manuals.

either one of those is great to teach the OP on.
 

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2016 OB, 2.5i Ltd w/Eyesight; 2011 Miata
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Although my wife drove an automatic Suburban, I always had another car with a manual shift & made sure that my kids learned to drive on it, figuring that it's an essential skill. Suburban and wife have passed and I now have an auto OB, but my Miata is a 6 speed manual. There's a woman in town who drove an automatic Miata - I just couldn't understand that! :iam:
 

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'15 Outback 2.5i Premium
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My kids learned to drive on stick shifts. It's absolutely a useful skill, but, even more important, those were all we had when they were learning to drive. They still prefer it. Watching one daughter parallel park her 5-speed Accord in a spot barely longer than the car on the left side of a steep hill in San Francisco was pretty impressive! I couldn't do that, at least not without a *lot* of practice.

To the OP: it's a good thing to know how to do. I was disappointed that the OBs no longer had the option, but I bought it anyway despite that. IMO, you have to be more more engaged with driving, which makes driving safer; try texting in city traffic while driving a car with a manual transmission. I dare you!
 

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I agree, Skip. It's a great way to "force" yourself to stay focused. And you probably won't fall asleep behind the wheel if you're shifting! I forgot a cool story, I went to a party once with a group of people and the driver had a little too much fun. I had to drive home, was a stick!
 

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I have the opposite perspective. I deal with 18 forward and 4 reverse gears in a semi truck all week long. I loathe having a stick in my personal vehicles. Part of that stems from the fact that shifting a heavy commercial truck is a whole different experience that shifting a trans in a small vehicle. While I grew up with manual personal vehicles, it requires a different technique to shift a heavy commercial truck, and all driving a manual car does is throw off my rhythm when I get back in the semi. Either way, the last thing I want to do when I drive my pickup or car is manual shift it.

I can see some preferring a manual trans. To them, go for it.
 

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I used to enjoy driving a stick. Learned on one, and drove one for the next 15 or so years. Then I moved to a place with a lot of rush hour traffic. Stop and go traffic for an hour so so each day + manual transmission = no fun.
 

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My car: 2002 Forester L, 2.5l, 4spd auto... Other half's car: 2006 LL Bean Outback, 3.0l, 5spd auto
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I have the opposite perspective. I deal with 18 forward and 4 reverse gears in a semi truck all week long. I loathe having a stick in my personal vehicles. Part of that stems from the fact that shifting a heavy commercial truck is a whole different experience that shifting a trans in a small vehicle. While I grew up with manual personal vehicles, it requires a different technique to shift a heavy commercial truck, and all driving a manual car does is throw off my rhythm when I get back in the semi. Either way, the last thing I want to do when I drive my pickup or car is manual shift it.

I can see some preferring a manual trans. To them, go for it.
Different strokes for different folks... I drove truck for nearly 20 years, and loved driving my manual tranny personal vehicles, too. :grin2: the car and the pickup both had manual trannies.

but sadly, I had to give up both when I developed problems with the left foot (bone spurs - made it seriously painful to operate a clutch - any clutch) I do miss the "fun" aspect, but i live with it.
 
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