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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
After researching relatively extensively on this forum (and legacygt.com – 5th generation), I tackled my lights modifications. I switched to HID low and high beams from HID Nation ( Search Result | HIDNation.com ) – I’ve used this supplier before. After the fiasco of removing a front inside-fender lining on the driver’s-side, it was a JOKE trying to think I could get in there and mount ballasts without massive bleeding!

So – I removed the front bumper so I could easily remove the headlights and simplify mounting and installing HIDs (and other LED lights in the headlight assembly). It probably took me the same amount of time, if not less time, to remove the bumper than to get-in through the fender well! Here’s a good video:

While the headlights are removed it’s SIMPLE/EASY to also install the (amber) turn signal, parking-light and (amber) side-maker lamps with LED’s at this time.

Here’s a HUGE Tip if you’re contemplating an HID (or even an LED Headlight) conversion. Disconnect the DRL if converting the high beam lamps!!! I’ve read all of the rhetoric regarding not having DRL's – so rather than tell me why this shouldn’t be done, please read this first.

In Subaru’s wisdom, at least on my 2014 Outback, they reduce the voltage to High Beams to operate the DRL’s. This reduced voltage WILL wreak Havoc (either immediately on in the [near] future) on your HID’s (or LED’s).

When you convert the High Beams (to HID or LED), the SIMPLEST/EASIEST method/way to turn-off the DRL’s is to dis-connect the DRL Resistor (two-wire connection), which is mounted on the outside, underneath the battery and bumper cover. I tested all my light installation at least THREE times before re-assembling the headlights. BUT – since I was in my garage; the DRL’s did not come on!!! I saw the DRL resistor and thought that it’d be really easy to disconnect but didn’t. Immediately upon leaving my garage, after I thought I was done, my DRL’s flickered A LOT! And; the passenger-side DRL actually wouldn’t work! So – had to crawl underneath the car and scraped the h*ll out of my hands (actually had to remove/re-install the resistor in order to disconnect the resistor); about a 30-minute fiasco. With the bumper removed, it would’ve taken less than 5-seconds to remove! I posted a picture of the DRL Resistor location when I had the bumper off (posted below).

With my previous car; a modified Toyota Corolla, I used my driving/fog-lights for my DRL’s – but had to “manually” turn them on, did not automatically come on. I had the driving lights turn on with the Parking Lights (a relatively simple modification/re-wire). I also had to turn-off the DRL’s for reasons stated above (a simple fuse removal).

Here’s the best article/method (from my research/opinion) for being able to manually turn-on the fog/driving lights. FYI – I used LED’s, cool-white, 6,000k in my fog lights. All LED’s were purchased from: 2014 Subaru Outback LED Lights | Super Bright LEDs

Here’s the article/modification for how-to manually turn-on the fog lights:
https://legacygt.com/forums/showthread.php/fog-light-mod-226270.html?t=226270

Here’s an important tip/modification to the instructions on how-to manually turn-on the fog lights: Locate the wires underneath the dash and “install” the T-taps onto the wires BEFORE installing the diode on the two male-spade terminals. After your light/burn-in the heat “heat-shrink,” you must bend it appropriately to place-it before it cools, into the two T-taps! I didn’t pre-bend it to the necessary curve (or close-to the needed curve) and in twisting the assembled diode/connectors; I BROKE the wire on the diode (picture below). I’m glad I purchased two $0.36 diodes!

I would also recommend crimping the diode wire (which is extremely skinny/thin) so the “split” on the connector is perpendicular to the crimp/press. With the connector laying on a flat-surface, the “split” was on the top, which is probably normal. I took apart a connector to discover this. I also put the crimping tool is a vice to assure a “good/tight” crimp (picture below). A “loose” crimp could become problematic.

I also replaced all my exterior and interior lights with “cool-white” (6,000k) LEDs. Use amber and red LED’s where appropriate.

I hope the attached pictures helps illustrate what I’ve shared. Good luck with “your” conversions!


495521


495241
 

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thanks for sharing your experience! i'm about to install some lighting upgrades too but going LED for the headlight low beams.

here are some clarifications for others:
  • if you are only converting your low beams, you don't have to disable the DRL (the post made it seem like you need to disable the DRL for any conversion). the 1/2 wattage DRL technique is an industry standard even to today so keeping the standard filament type will be fine. you cannot half power HID or LED, so yes as stated DRLs need to be disabled or bypassed if you convert the high beams.
  • i believe what was circled as a relay is just the load resistor that cuts the wattage to the high beams, but yes disconnecting it will disable the DRLs as desired.
also from what i've read, HIDs tend to run pretty hot in the bowl of the projector and tends to melt the chrome reflective coating on OBs. perhaps this was just on cheaper HID kits out there so you may be fine running with a quality kit from HID nation. just wanted to let you know. this was primarily the reason why i chose to go LED which runs cooler (but likely has less lumens than HID).
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
thanks for sharing your experience! i'm about to install some lighting upgrades too but going LED for the headlight low beams.

here are some clarifications for others:
  • if you are only converting your low beams, you don't have to disable the DRL (the post made it seem like you need to disable the DRL for any conversion). the 1/2 wattage DRL technique is an industry standard even to today so keeping the standard filament type will be fine. you cannot half power HID or LED, so yes as stated DRLs need to be disabled or bypassed if you convert the high beams.
  • i believe what was circled as a relay is just the load resistor that cuts the wattage to the high beams, but yes disconnecting it will disable the DRLs as desired.
also from what i've read, HIDs tend to run pretty hot in the bowl of the projector and tends to melt the chrome reflective coating on OBs. perhaps this was just on cheaper HID kits out there so you may be fine running with a quality kit from HID nation. just wanted to let you know. this was primarily the reason why i chose to go LED which runs cooler (but likely has less lumens than HID).
Thanks for the feedback timmy0tool! I did mis-speak, it should be referenced as the DRL "Resistor," not "Relay." I'll try and correct the post and picture. I'll also clarify the DRL Resistor relates to "high beam" conversions - I didn't explain/write that very well.

I'll keep my eyes-on the lamp reflectors. I never had any issues on my Corolla from heat on the reflectors. I had both HID and LED in my Corolla and HIDs are much "brighter" (more lumens) than LED's. LED's are much brighter than stock, especially if you get the "cool white." My cool-white LED fog lights are probably 3x brighter than stock Outback - remember, I'm using these as DRL's (my stock foglights are "on" in my avatar).
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I just read this HID/LED Conversion article: Exterior Lighting Upgrades (it was "Recommended Reading" below this post). This could be what timmy0tool was referring to regarding the HID high beams. But - It seems like these lights are "on," only with the Light Switch is on Park?!?

So - I just reinstalled the stock parking lights, removed the LED's I was using for park lights (I didn't have any issues, but haven't driven the car much at night). I did do a night-time trial run after the conversion - used my high beams a bit.
 

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on my 2014 the housing was marked D2S and that means it can accept a HID bulb. I did the HID upgrade on the 2014 Legacy in early 2018 nearly 3 years now and no light degradation. Stuffed the same Miromoto HID kit into my 2010 Outback last year and got the same results in terms of light output. Bright crisp clear with good cut off. both kits are 35W and i can see a 55W kit cooking a housing but that is more likely due to excessive UV light output (normal for HID)
 

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on my 2014 the housing was marked D2S and that means it can accept a HID bulb. I did the HID upgrade on the 2014 Legacy in early 2018 nearly 3 years now and no light degradation. Stuffed the same Miromoto HID kit into my 2010 Outback last year and got the same results in terms of light output. Bright crisp clear with good cut off. both kits are 35W and i can see a 55W kit cooking a housing but that is more likely due to excessive UV light output (normal for HID)
Interesting thread, looking to maybe upgrade to HID for the upcoming winter.
May I ask what colour K did you buy? and did you buy from a dealer or amazon or...?
 

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4500K for the 14 and 5000K for the outback
 
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