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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For over 10 years I have been a Ford loyalist until recently with my Escape issues and how it is being handled. I do not care for the cheap Honda or Yotas, and refuse to buy Government Motors and "Dodge" me while buying.

I am impressed with the amount of room the Outback has, and the 2.5 is plenty for me, and the mileage seems stable at 30-34 at 60mph from what I have read. My main concern comes with the CVT reliability, and the overall reliability. I know Subaru's last, BUT if they break out of warranty, expensive mechanic time coming. Looking for straight up answers, not bias loyalist please :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My main concern comes with the CVT reliability, and the overall reliability. I know Subaru's last, BUT if they break out of warranty, expensive mechanic time coming. Looking for straight up answers, not bias loyalist please :D
How reliable is the CVT and car as a whole?
 

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'13 2.5Ltd w/EyeSight ::::: '02 2.5Ltd AT
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Good luck getting a bunch of self-identified Subaru loyalists not to show bias. Don't take our word for it, ask Consumer Reports who just selected Subaru as the most reliable car you can buy. Or, if you prefer, observe the resale values of the CVT versus any competitor. I considered the total cost to own against domestic and foreign because there are some factors for repairs. Personally, I can't tell you about the reliability of the CVT because mine only has 1000 miles on it. My other Outback travelled to Florida, DC, and North Dakota in the last year. 12 yrs and over 150,000 miles and still ridiculously reliable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Good luck getting a bunch of self-identified Subaru loyalists not to show bias. Don't take our word for it, ask Consumer Reports who just selected Subaru as the most reliable car you can buy. Or, if you prefer, observe the resale values of the CVT versus any competitor. I considered the total cost to own against domestic and foreign because there are some factors for repairs. Personally, I can't tell you about the reliability of the CVT because mine only has 1000 miles on it. My other Outback travelled to Florida, DC, and North Dakota in the last year. 12 yrs and over 150,000 miles and still ridiculously reliable.
My main concern really, is the CVT tranny and also curious on engine accessories (oil pump, alternator, power steering, etc).
 

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2011 2.5i Premium, CVT, Azurite Blue, added Hidden Hitch
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There may be a thread here about the CVT, but I certainly haven't heard of any problems at all. And by now, some must have quite a few miles of hard driving.

Mine is 2 yeard old now,and no problems at all.
 

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2001 Outback wagon, 4EAT
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I suppose transmission problems are always expensive, and with the CVT being new for Subaru I can see where you're concerned. But as for the overall cost of repairs, I don't think they're that bad as long as you find a good independent mechanic that knows his way around a Subaru. The nice thing about the boxer engine is that a lot of the parts that might go (alternator, power steering pump, a/c pump) are right there on top of the engine. In the older ones at least there's also tons of room to poke around. Look under the hood of a Honda or a Nissan and you'll appreciate the difference. A buddy and I changed the alternator out on my old Nissan Sentra once and it took us hours, mostly removing other parts just to be able to get at the thing. On my second generation Outback I couldn't see it taking more than 20 minutes. Knowledge of the car is everything though, which is why a good mechanic is key. When I bought my Outback it had a leaky oil pan the guy who sold it to me had tried to patch with epoxy. It also had a blown transmission line. The first Quikee Oil Change place I took it to (not a chain, just an idiot) told me it would cost over $1000 (for an oilpan!) because he would need to take the rack and pinion off, adding an alignment to the job, etc. etc. I took it to the guy I always go to now and he quoted me around $200 for the line and the pan, half of which was for the parts. What the first guy didn't realize is that you can just pry a certain suspension part up with a screwdriver and the pan slides right out. The car has 140k on it, so other things have had to be replaced, but I've never felt like was overpaying for the work.
 

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2001 Outback wagon, 4EAT
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BTW I'm not really that enamored with the new Outback (like the 2nd gen one I have and LOVE the 3rd gen) but I have never known anyone to have owned or driven a Ford Escape have anything positive to say about it, so it's got to be an improvement over that.
 

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2008 Ford Escape XLS - 2002 Subaru Outback
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I love my Escape. I seriously do -
 

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2011 Outback 3.6R Limited--Sky Blue Metallic
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The CVT isn't new for Subaru. Justy had one 25 years ago.
Subaru Justy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
That is true, but the Justy's CVT utilized rubber belts, like many other CVTs.
By contrast, Subaru's new CVT utilizes a wide roller chain for power transfer, and that should make a significant difference in the lifespan of the CVT.

However, no matter what type of automatic transmission (CVT or "conventional"), anyone who does not change the fluid every 3 yrs/30k miles is being very shortsighted, IMHO.

Even if the maintenance schedule does not list this service, trans fluid should be changed every 3 yrs/30k miles if you are going to keep the vehicle for the long term.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I was curious as to the paddle shifters with a CVT. Usually a CVT is continuous but it does allow a gear change, weird. I do love the room in the car, and for the money you really can't compare anything else.
 

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I was curious as to the paddle shifters with a CVT. Usually a CVT is continuous but it does allow a gear change, weird. I do love the room in the car, and for the money you really can't compare anything else.
The paddle shifters simulate virtual gear changes through the wonder of technology. In manual mode, it will hold "ratios" just like a stick shift.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The paddle shifters simulate virtual gear changes through the wonder of technology. In manual mode, it will hold "ratios" just like a stick shift.
Which I like. I was confused at how efficient an AWD setup would really be with a CVT. Being a chain and not a belt also makes me feel much better.
 

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2012 Outback 2.5i Premium 6MT Built: 01/12, 2014 Forester CVT Limited
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I was curious as to the paddle shifters with a CVT. Usually a CVT is continuous but it does allow a gear change, weird. I do love the room in the car, and for the money you really can't compare anything else.


The mechanism works like a string-instrument, ie a guitar. When you press on the paddles, a metal lever pushes down or rises up on the CVTs metal belt. The higher the downshift the more pressure of placed on the belt, if upshifting, less pressure.

I love my Outback. For you I recommend getting a Toyota Hilux diesel or the an Outback diesel which will be available in the US market fall of 2009.
 

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2016 Outback 2.5i Premium w/nav/eye
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I just want to be 100% on something, the 2012 has a timing chain, correct?
no, the my13' does. it uses the fb25 model series..
 

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2013 Legacy Lim CVT Car: 2011 OB Prem 6MT Car: 2006 Miata GT 6MT mc: 2003 Honda GL1800A * Reunite Gondwanaland *
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I just want to be 100% on something, the 2012 has a timing chain, correct?
For model year 2012, only the 6 cylinder OB has a timing chain;
the 4 cylinder OB has a timing belt. The 4-cylinder has a chain
beginning in model year 2013.

FWIW, I've been driving OHC cars since 1970 and never had a
timing belt problem, but I have had two engines destroyed by
timing chain failures. Both failed suddenly and without warning
in well-maintained cars with less than 100,000 miles.

Belts are quieter and lighter. They also provide more accurate &
stable valve timing -- because, unlike chains, they don't stretch.

Bottom line: I wouldn't consider either a deal-breaker -- but all
else being equal, I (slightly) prefer timing belts.

...ymmv,

Looby
 

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2013 Subaru Outback Limited 2.5
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FWIW, I've been driving OHC cars since 1970 and never had a
timing belt problem, but I have had two engines destroyed by
timing chain failures. Both failed suddenly and without warning
in well-maintained cars with less than 100,000 miles.
,

Looby
Well I am just the oposite.. I have had one belt break at 45K miles destorying the engine (the owners manual said check it at 55K) then it broke again at 65K miles and it destoryed the engine again. (yep that one broke with only 20K miles on it. Lucky it was under warranty.. However I have never had a chain failure.. I have replaced the belt twice on our outback once at the 100K mark and once again because the timing belt was driving the water pump and I had to replace it then...
 

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2011 Outback Premium 6MT
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That is true, but the Justy's CVT utilized rubber belts, like many other CVTs.
By contrast, Subaru's new CVT utilizes a wide roller chain for power transfer, and that should make a significant difference in the lifespan of the CVT.

However, no matter what type of automatic transmission (CVT or "conventional"), anyone who does not change the fluid every 3 yrs/30k miles is being very shortsighted, IMHO.

Even if the maintenance schedule does not list this service, trans fluid should be changed every 3 yrs/30k miles if you are going to keep the vehicle for the long term.
The Justy was a metal belt, push belt, just like the Outback. CVT's that typically use rubber belts are in snowmobiles, utility vehicles, some motorcycles, go karts etc.
 
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