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Looking for help...I'd like to convert my 12V Power outlet in the cargo area of my 2010 Outback to be always "on" instead of switched with ACC. Has anyone done this conversion?

Does anyone have a wiring diagram? Usually these outlets are driven by a relay that can be removed and a jumper can be installed on the contact side where the relay plugged in. If I knew which relay and where it was located that would be an easy conversion.

Help anyone?

Thanks...Bill
 

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Looking for help...I'd like to convert my 12V Power outlet in the cargo area of my 2010 Outback to be always "on" instead of switched with ACC. Has anyone done this conversion?

Does anyone have a wiring diagram? Usually these outlets are driven by a relay that can be removed and a jumper can be installed on the contact side where the relay plugged in. If I knew which relay and where it was located that would be an easy conversion.

Help anyone?

Thanks...Bill
Use search this has been discussed a bunch already. Regardless of an always hot plug - the simple fact your battery capacity is so small I would never leave anything plugged into the hot plug without the car running anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Use search this has been discussed a bunch already. Regardless of an always hot plug - the simple fact your battery capacity is so small I would never leave anything plugged into the hot plug without the car running anyway.
Appreciate the response. I did search first, but all I found was info on adding a second outlet and using the trailer-light connections to do so. Do you have a link for the jumping around the relay? I couldn't find one.
 

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Nope - I re did all the wiring and upgraded our battery system in my 28foot sailboat which ran two group 24s same size as the single battery in the OB. The capacity that battery has is so little you can't run even small items off it for long before you have issues regarding a dead battery.

If I had a hobby where I needed a charging station like say my past life in the RC planes and cars stuff - I would build a plywood battery box with a meter and power panel mounted on it. With the high powered electrics today I would probably put a Group31 deep cycle battery in it and charge it at home off the standard battery charger.

We run two group 31 deep cycle batteries on the boat which will give us a solid 24hrs of house power for 10hr 3watt anchor light - power a laptop and support cabin lights with no issues and allow us to start the diesel up the next day to charge. The old group24's couldn't do that with enough of a buffer to ensure we could start the diesel. If we do longer trips I'll add a dedicated starter battery for the engine but I've seen my ipad charger nearly kill a group 24 battery in just a short time which is why I wouldn't leave anything plugged into a hot plug on the OB unless you plan on getting a jump start next time you need to start the car.
 

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To actually answer your question, at least on my 2007, there is no relay. The socket runs directly to the fusebox. Assuming the 2010 is the same, heated seats are on the same circuit so you'd want to make sure and separate the two.
 

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Subiesailor, you guessed it... RC planes...need to charge batteries when at the flying field and do not want to leave the ignition on ACC because there will be additional power drain nor do I want to open the hood and connect directly to the battery. I did this conversion on my Honda Element (simple unplug of a relay and addition of a jumper) and used it for years...but I needed real AWD, which the Honda does not have, so I bought a soob. No problem draining the car battery in all the years I did it, but I do carry a jumper just in case.

...wiring diagram anyone???? :D

Thanks...Bill
 

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Subiesailor, you guessed it... RC planes...need to charge batteries when at the flying field and do not want to leave the ignition on ACC because there will be additional power drain nor do I want to open the hood and connect directly to the battery. I did this conversion on my Honda Element (simple unplug of a relay and addition of a jumper) and used it for years...but I needed real AWD, which the Honda does not have, so I bought a soob. No problem draining the car battery in all the years I did it, but I do carry a jumper just in case.

...wiring diagram anyone???? :D

Thanks...Bill
Bill I was the designated flight instructor for about three years at our club. Got the point I didn't even bring my own planes given I spent nearly the whole day teaching with other peoples planes.

I wouldn't even bother with the modification - build a battery box install the power panel from Tower etc. Charge the battery on the standard battery charger the night before and go. Plus you can always use it for other power needs or put it in another car etc. The Lipo battery systems and chargers are not kind to the small group 24 car batteries a long day at the field could have you doing a jump start to go home. :)

Not to mention I've seen a few lipo fires I wouldn't be charging them in your car. Make sure you check your car insurance details they may not cover fire damage or loss caused by modified power plugs used to charge Lipo batteries.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
To actually answer your question, at least on my 2007, there is no relay. The socket runs directly to the fusebox. Assuming the 2010 is the same, heated seats are on the same circuit so you'd want to make sure and separate the two.
Thanks BlueCorn. Ugh... hope they added a relay for the 2010 redesign. The good news (or bad news) is that I have a base model with no heated seats. Thats why I am hoping to find a wiring diagram to see what else is on the circuit, but if there is no relay I would probably just add a second socket off the trailer-light wiring.
 

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If you are worried about what else may be on the circuit I would just pull a wire directly from the OEM battery through the firewall to wherever you want the new outlet. That way you can wire it for the appropriate amount of current draw, wire size and placement and you won't have to deal with the ignition switch or loosing some other function.
 

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Looking for help...I'd like to convert my 12V Power outlet in the cargo area of my 2010 Outback to be always "on" instead of switched with ACC. . . .
The rear cargo area and center console accessory power outlets (not the one in the dash board area) are on the same circuit. They are powered from fuse #13 (20 Amps) in the in-cabin fuse panel to the left of the steering column.

Fuse #13, in turn, is powered through the Accessory Relay, which is mounted on the back of the in-cabin fuse panel, and also powers the front accessory outlet, the power mirrors, and the rear view mirror (dimming control). The relay has "always on" 12 V on one side of it, and is closed (makes connection) only when the ignition switch is in the ACC or ON position.

If the relay is removed and bridged with a jumper wire, as you apparently did with the Element, you would have what you are looking for, but the other accessories would also be powered at all times.

I'm more with subiesailor on this; a separate charger power pack rather than to potentially drain down the car battery. These cars are run by microprocessors; they and their software don't seem to like "brown-outs".
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The rear cargo area and center console accessory power outlets (not the one in the dash board area) are on the same circuit. They are powered from fuse #13 (20 Amps) in the in-cabin fuse panel to the left of the steering column.

Fuse #13, in turn, is powered through the Accessory Relay, which is mounted on the back of the in-cabin fuse panel, and also powers the front accessory outlet, the power mirrors, and the rear view mirror (dimming control). The relay has "always on" 12 V on one side of it, and is closed (makes connection) only when the ignition switch is in the ACC or ON position.

If the relay is removed and bridged with a jumper wire, as you apparently did with the Element, you would have what you are looking for, but the other accessories would also be powered at all times.

I'm more with subiesailor on this; a separate charger power pack rather than to potentially drain down the car battery. These cars are run by microprocessors; they and their software don't seem to like "brown-outs".
Thanks Plane OM. This is just what I needed to know. I can see what the current draw is on fuse #13 when power is applied as I wouldn't want the battery to drain with the car just sitting there. The side mirrors likely won't pull any current unless they are moving, but the dimming mirror might and in that case this conversion would be a bad idea.

Plane OM and Subiesailor...appreciate your concern too; but I don't actually charge in the car, the power cord to the charger goes outside the cargo area to a table I set up outside and my LiPo's are charged in a fireproof container. I am just not fond of carrying around another big lead acid battery in the back of my car. Sometimes they leak and I have to drive mountain roads and I don't like the possibility of a battery sliding around or tipping over. I am much more worried about that danger really.

For what its worth, I am an Electrical Engineer and do have lots of experience with charging systems, battery powered systems and understanding how many AH I can safely draw from an auto battery without fully discharging it. I promise to be careful :)
 

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Thanks Plane OM. This is just what I needed to know. I can see what the current draw is on fuse #13 when power is applied as I wouldn't want the battery to drain with the car just sitting there. The side mirrors likely won't pull any current unless they are moving, but the dimming mirror might and in that case this conversion would be a bad idea.

Plane OM and Subiesailor...appreciate your concern too; but I don't actually charge in the car, the power cord to the charger goes outside the cargo area to a table I set up outside and my LiPo's are charged in a fireproof container. I am just not fond of carrying around another big lead acid battery in the back of my car. Sometimes they leak and I have to drive mountain roads and I don't like the possibility of a battery sliding around or tipping over. I am much more worried about that danger really.

For what its worth, I am an Electrical Engineer and do have lots of experience with charging systems, battery powered systems and understanding how many AH I can safely draw from an auto battery without fully discharging it. I promise to be careful :)
Fair enough. Battery box strapped down poses no issues. My planes moved around more than my box did. -)
 

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I charge my helis off a 12v "jump box" which in turn is charged by the rear 12v socket. So far it works, no pack fires in the car...
 

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Another option, to retain the OEM location, would be to run a constant from the battery back to the plug, then simply unplug it from the factory harness and connect it to your wiring. 100% reversible, and you'll be able to use an inline fuse to meet your specs.

I've jumped the outlets on my past two Subarus to add an extra, hidden plug, for my XM. It's fairly easy to tap into the plug without any damage. Or you could use some spade connectors.
 
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