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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, new to the forums in anticipation of buying a fourth generation Outback.

This will be my commuter - 850 miles a week at 77 mph - as well as a tow vehicle for a 17-foot sailboat (about 1,000) pounds. Next spring, will be looking for a popup camper (no more than 2,000) pounds to pull on weekend trips and maybe a couple of weeks cross country.

Since I haven't owned a Subaru since a 1984 Justy (there's a blast from the past), I'm wondering if the experts here have any guidance on what to watch out for as I'm kicking tires.

Given my budget, probably looking at 2011-12 with less than 100,000 miles on it.

Thanks for you help, and I hope I won't be seeing you in the repair forums!
 

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On the Super Mod Squad
02 Pair: 3.0 VDC Wag & 2.5 Limited Sedan
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26,200 Posts
justy for the USDM = 87-94, and I use to drive a 88 2wd a whole lot.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subaru_Justy#United_States ,

...did you live somewhere else to get a 84?

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I think to be pulling around a 2000# popup you should have a 2010-14 3.6 model,.
.. this gives sufficient hp / torque, and the beautiful 5EAT,

and not the CVT with the extended warranty,... (2010-15)

paired with the last of the EJ253 of 2010-12

or newer FB25B engine = that also may have a exented warranty for oil issues (13-15).
 

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2013 3.6R Limited
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900 Posts
As recommended above, get the 3.6R mated to the 5EAT. That combination will provide your best chance of avoiding transmission failures over the long haul. I did my research in 2015 and drew the same conclusion before purchasing our 3.6R in early November 2015. Nothing but routine maintenance since I purchased it, and I took the time to chase down the service history before pulling the trigger on it.

As additional transmission insurance protection, do an ATF drain-and-fill every 30,000 miles. It is an easy DIY job requiring 4.5 to 5 quarts of the appropriate ATF that will cost you about $35 total. Well worth the time, effort, and expense.
 

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2012 Outback 3.6R
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50 Posts
The 6 cyl and 5EAT is the way to go for towing on highways. Extra HP and transmission kickdown are nice to have when you want or NEED it. I haul a golf cart with trailer all over the east coast with no worries. At 135K miles, transmission/engine just as good as the first day it rolled off the lot. Change ATF+diffs every 30K, oil every 5K. Good luck.
 
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