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2018, 2.5i, Premium, fake shifting CVT
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25 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Any indication they will phase this programming out? It really degrades the drivability of the vehicle. My daughter recently bought a '06 Murano with a CVT - smooth as can be - no fake shifting, no hunting for a ratio, just the right RPMs to provide the right power to the wheels like a CVT should. I'd be glad to be put on a beta test list of having this programmed out. This programming will keep me from buying another Subaru.
 

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2015 3.6R Limited w/ES
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2,768 Posts
Rest easy, you're not alone, but this thread is massively redundant.

Oh, and NO, you'll never get that programmed out.
 

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2018, 2.5i, Premium, fake shifting CVT
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25 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
They programmed it in - they should be able to program it out fairly easily. Or, at least give the option to turn the silliness off.
Oh, and I do know the cruise control trick, but I shouldn't need to "trick" it to make it act correctly.
 

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2015 3.6R Limited w/ES
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2,768 Posts
They programmed it in - they should be able to program it out fairly easily. Or, at least give the option to turn the silliness off.
Well that's obvious because there were no "shifts" on Gen 4 Outback CVTs. However, there's a difference between what they can do and what they will do. I'd wager any amount of money that you won't get such a fix, at least not from Subaru.
 

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19 Outback 2.5i Premium
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170 Posts
For those who want the option to turn off the Shift Points, PLEASE write to Subaru and politely ask them to give us the option, either via the car settings, or at the service center, to turn off the simulated shift points.

When I wrote them, they did respond saying they encourage any suggestions. I'm hoping that enough people write them, they might make it happen.
 

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2019 Forester Sport. Love the Orange.
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4,016 Posts
Go figure, When I bought a 2011 Limited in late 2010 people around here were railing about the rubber band CVT with no shift points. Wasn't natural and took away from the driving experience. So SOA added shift points. Now it degrades the drivability .
 

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2018 Touring 3.6R
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867 Posts
Is this something more noticeable in day-to-day on the 2.5? I really don't notice the fake shifting at all with the 3.6 and IIRC it seems only obvious when WOT from a lower speed. I had to get on the pedal hard last week while merging and don't recall anything goofy then.
 

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2013 O.B. and 2018 O.B.
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99 Posts
I have a 2018 with 2.5 and it is horrible, right? Have a 19 Ascent and even worse in that model as especially low speeds, 20-30 mph. Shits in and out over and over.
 

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2016 OB Limited 3.6R
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180 Posts
I only notice it at low speeds, "shifting" from first to second for example. I think the fake shifts are silly and take away from the otherwise butter smooth acceleration and operation.

Not sure how the 2006 Murano was programmed but I was cross shopping the 2015+ Murano and they have fake shifts. The shifts were much more noticeable in the Nissan and lacked low end gitty up even with their V6. The 3.6R has a ton of power and sensitive throttle which I prefer and am happy Subaru designed it this way. I enjoy the on demand power.
 

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2018, 2.5i, Premium, fake shifting CVT
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25 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
For those who want the option to turn off the Shift Points, PLEASE write to Subaru and politely ask them to give us the option, either via the car settings, or at the service center, to turn off the simulated shift points.

When I wrote them, they did respond saying they encourage any suggestions. I'm hoping that enough people write them, they might make it happen.
I've reached out - several times - and this is their latest reply. It's similar to the replies I've gotten in the past.

"Thank you for contacting Subaru of America, Inc. We appreciate you taking time out of your day to contact us.

I am sorry to learn of your displeasure. Currently, there is not an update available to change this feature, but I will pass on your feedback to Product Development to consider when developing future updates. Past input from our customers has been helpful in initiating changes. The most valued opinion of any business is that of its customers. Your comments are valuable to us in that they provide us with a clear picture of our products as seen by our owners.

If you need any more information, please feel free to contact us again. Thank you for the opportunity to be of assistance.

Sincerely,

Tyler Devault
Subaru of America, Inc.
Customer/Retailer Services Department
1-800-SUBARU3 (1-800-782-2783)"
 

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2016 Outback 3.6R Limited w/ EyeSight
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232 Posts
Is this something more noticeable in day-to-day on the 2.5? I really don't notice the fake shifting at all with the 3.6 and IIRC it seems only obvious when WOT from a lower speed. I had to get on the pedal hard last week while merging and don't recall anything goofy then.
This is my experience as well. This is my first CVT so I have nothing to compare it to either.
 

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2015 Subaru Forester XT Touring
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8 Posts
With 2014-2016 Forester XT they got it right...
1) I-mode is full CVT, no shifts, keeps RPMs as low as possible (usually around 1500 RPMs) and makes it feel sluggish at the time but saves some fuel. Manual option has 6 pre-set ratios.
2) S-mode is full CVT, keeps RPMs higher (1700-2000) but feels much more responsive. Manual option has 6 pre-set ratios.
3) S#-mode behaves like aggressive 8speed auto but it also stay as low as 1500 RPM if you control right foot. Supper responsive behavior. Manual option has 8 pre-set ratios. Most importantly S# 8th gear is same as I-mode's 6th, so you can keep it in S# and still have comparable fuel economy (as long as you behave).

In my opinion, this is how every CVT should be, with options for full CVT or stepped, instead of calling it "sport" modes etc...

I much less liked 2017-2018 XT (and WRX) that has stepped I and S modes after certain % of gas pedal pressed but it will still behave as full CVT below. Where they made huge mistake is that they significantly shortened S# final gearss (and 1st ratios is still the same with I-mode, so no acceleration advantage from stop) so 8th gear in S# is like 4-5th gear in I-mode to give us impression that it is responsive (with very small ratio spread between 1st and 8th gear), making it useless for daily driving...
 

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3,175 Posts
With 2014-2016 Forester XT they got it right...
1) I-mode is full CVT, no shifts, keeps RPMs as low as possible (usually around 1500 RPMs) and makes it feel sluggish at the time but saves some fuel. Manual option has 6 pre-set ratios.
2) S-mode is full CVT, keeps RPMs higher (1700-2000) but feels much more responsive. Manual option has 6 pre-set ratios.
3) S#-mode behaves like aggressive 8speed auto but it also stay as low as 1500 RPM if you control right foot. Supper responsive behavior. Manual option has 8 pre-set ratios. Most importantly S# 8th gear is same as I-mode's 6th, so you can keep it in S# and still have comparable fuel economy (as long as you behave).

In my opinion, this is how every CVT should be, with options for full CVT or stepped, instead of calling it "sport" modes etc...

I much less liked 2017-2018 XT (and WRX) that has stepped I and S modes after certain % of gas pedal pressed but it will still behave as full CVT below. Where they made huge mistake is that they significantly shortened S# final gearss (and 1st ratios is still the same with I-mode, so no acceleration advantage from stop) so 8th gear in S# is like 4-5th gear in I-mode to give us impression that it is responsive (with very small ratio spread between 1st and 8th gear), making it useless for daily driving...
Some markets have the Subaru SI drive on the outbacks. Not in North America though. Not sure how it works, but I’m guessing it’s similar to that.

To get mine to run through the “gears”, I have to really be on the throttle. Just a bit, it buzzes at around 1700ish and slowly accelerates. Tip the throttle a little more, it’ll bump up, forget exactly where, but maybe 2400? Faster version of the buzzing up to speed. I have to really step on it to get it to want to start rowing through the pretend gears. My foot controls the behavior. I guess if you wanted more throttle with the constant buzz then it’s not ideal. I like it just fine. I hated the CVT I test drove on the Gen4 (so much so I refused to get the 4 cylinder that I wanted originally for my first outback)
 

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19 2.5i OB LTD w/SSD Strt Twr Brc + OEM 19mm RSB
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1,304 Posts
How do these modes, or selection preferences get realized on the outback? We don't have it... Are we to write SOA and request it?

I have never driven a car with a CVT... Sometimes my 2.5i feels like the clutch is slipping as if I had a manual, and was applying a little clutch.

Is this to be expected? I really don't know what is.
 

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431 Posts
This is one of those threads that has no “right” response but plenty of responses. Here’s mine:

The 2014 Forester 2.5i CVT, which had NO modes or shift points, was horrible. I’ll say it again:Horrible. It was my personal intro to owning a CVT vehicle and it made me hate the breed. I literally detested driving it so much I would park it for days, not because of the overall design, but due to the drivetrain.

Traded to a 2015 FXTT, and it was better, but hardly “getting it right”. “I” mode was reminiscent of the 2.5i programming and response. Rubber banding, crappy response, and generally urging me to floor it to get some power, which I often did do. “S” mode was better, with good response, but there was still that off the line lagging problem. “S#” ? There was a mode with no real purpose I could find for normal operation. Built in shift points that were way too high, and shifts would hang up near red line. Great for powering out from a tight merge, but generally useless from day to day.

My overall assessment was that I understood where they were trying to go, but all of the attempts were less than stellar. That 2015 SI drive was a disappointment, but still with the turbo far, far, far, better than the 2.5 CVT. But, of course, an old “three on the tree” manual felt better than that did.

With my 2019 OBTT 3.6 it’s completely different. No modes, does have shift points, but I hardly ever feel any of it. The engine and trans are so well matched that power delivery is entirely linear, and works so darn well. No turbo lag, if there is rubber band effect it’s not noticeable, and it passes cars when needed with no fuss. It probably would be OK without shift points, but I don’t care. It’s a keeper like it is. The best drivetrain of my three Subaru’s, by a light year.

EJ


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
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