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2019 Outback Premium 2.5
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Discussion Starter #1
Put after market rims and snow tires and tire shop says there are no sensors in the Subaru tires on my new 2019 Outback premium, what the ****?
 

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2019 Outback Premium 2.5
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7 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Can’t believe that a auto maker would not include something like this. It’s this kind of thing that I’m experiencing with my 2019 Outback that will drive me back to Ford. I’m quickly realizing they have the best bells and whistles!
 

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I simply cannot abide useless people.
2006 2.5i and 2002 3.0 wagons.
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12,185 Posts
People can always find something to complain about.
 

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2019 Outback Premium 2.5
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7 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks! I pride myself on doing my due diligence when shopping. The reports on the Subaru by the experts and friends were compelling but the bells and whistles of the Subaru are inferior to those of my 4 year old Flex! Just my observation.
 

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I simply cannot abide useless people.
2006 2.5i and 2002 3.0 wagons.
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12,185 Posts
People been saying Subaru is inferior for this or that compared to Insert Previous Brand Here for as long as I've been on the forum. Same with every other car make. If it isn't what you're used to, it's obviously worse. If Fords make you happy, stick with them.

That said, as a minority car buyer I can't stand nor do I want to bells and whistles. If I could get a car without camera, touchscreens, wifi, bluetooth, autodriving, etc I would gladly do so. For those of us who neither want nor can afford a perpetual latest and greatest car payment, simple is easier/cheaper to fix and keep on the road
 

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2019 Outback Premium 2.5
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Discussion Starter #7
I felt the same as you about a lot of technology but some of it is hard to part with once you’re comfortable with it especially as I age . I left the Flex cause this is the last production year.
 

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2015 3.6R Limited w/ES
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2,401 Posts
Simple. Do your homework before big purchases and you're far less likely to find yourself with buyers remorse.
 

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Can’t believe that a auto maker would not include something like this. It’s this kind of thing that I’m experiencing with my 2019 Outback that will drive me back to Ford. I’m quickly realizing they have the best bells and whistles!
My last Ford had a terrific engine and transmission. The rest of the car was garbage. It became almost unuseable by 50K miles. I sold it for less than the engine and transmission were worth. If your car doesn't have TPMS you can buy a pressure gauge for a few dollars at the auto parts store.
 

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2008 OB Limited 2.5i, Portland OR USA
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4,602 Posts
TPMS has been required in the US for 2008 and newer models, and in the EU for 2012 and newer. I would suppose that some Canadian-spec models can get it as an option, but it's certainly not required there. And a lot of Canadian cars apparently have it, at least in Ontario:

 

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2019 Subaru Outback Touring 3.6R
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156 Posts
I did a ton of research before purchasing my 2019 Outback Touring 3.6R. I was attracted to it by its many safety features and all of the up to date gadgets that I am used to on my Cadillac. Don't get me wrong, I love how my Subaru drives and handles, The power is adequate and I love the safety features when they decide to actually work. None of them with the exception of the anti lock brakes can be relied upon. They either work or dont work on a daily basis with no apparent reason. Is it a safety feature if you cannot depend on it. I must drive as if none of the features are available. I returned to my trusty Garmin GPS that has served me well for about 3 yrs now. Oh but instead of a well engineered and tested car I did get paddle shifters. I am sure I will find a use for them one day.
 

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2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
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6,419 Posts
None of [the safety features] with the exception of the anti lock brakes can be relied upon. They either work or dont work on a daily basis with no apparent reason. Is it a safety feature if you cannot depend on it. I must drive as if none of the features are available.
The only consistent factor in all of your many complaints is you. Perhaps you would be happier with a different vehicle.
 

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2017 Outback 3.6 Touring, which replaced '05 Outback XT
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757 Posts
The power is adequate and I love the safety features when they decide to actually work. None of them with the exception of the anti lock brakes can be relied upon. They either work or dont work on a daily basis with no apparent reason.
I'm not sure how you could arrive at that conclusion. Do you routinely have close calls in daily driving? I rarely get into a circumstance where I would expect eyesight to react, other than occasionally getting a beep from drifting a bit in a narrow lane. IIHS and NHTSA both give the safety systems high marks. None of the safety systems available on the market today work perfectly in every scenario, but having them is certainly better than not.

If you want to understand more about how these systems work, PBS Nova just did a show on real world testing of self driving cars. They found that state of the art systems gets fooled quite easily and self driving cars might be farther from reality than the hype might suggest. The show is available online.
 

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Here is an example... the 'Lane Keep Assist' can only work if the eyesight cameras can 'see' the lines on the road. Here in Vermont in the winter, this is rarely the case. The sand/salt/snow on the roads will cover up the painted lines.

Also, as the traffic drives over this crud on the roads (and the snowplows scrape the roads) The painted lines wear off the roads entirely. Without lines, the 'Lane Keep Assist' system is 'blind' and will not work.

It is interesting to monitor the dashboard display for this 'Lane Keep Assist' function. It will show the driver when it cannot 'see' the lanes.

Also during the winter, the entire vehicle can get covered with the white layer of dried salt residue. This coating can really mess with some of the sensors which need a clear 'view' of the road.
 

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2017 2.5i Premium Lapis Blue
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2,932 Posts
Here is an example... the 'Lane Keep Assist' can only work if the eyesight cameras can 'see' the lines on the road. Here in Vermont in the winter, this is rarely the case. The sand/salt/snow on the roads will cover up the painted lines.

Also, as the traffic drives over this crud on the roads (and the snowplows scrape the roads) The painted lines wear off the roads entirely. Without lines, the 'Lane Keep Assist' system is 'blind' and will not work.

It is interesting to monitor the dashboard display for this 'Lane Keep Assist' function. It will show the driver when it cannot 'see' the lanes.

Also during the winter, the entire vehicle can get covered with the white layer of dried salt residue. This coating can really mess with some of the sensors which need a clear 'view' of the road.
I've been amazed that eyesight can detect lanes using the snow itself when any sign of the painted lines is completely under the snow. It must just "see" the contrast between patches of blacktop in the ruts from the tires and the windrow of snow along side of the ruts. I remember before I got my car I asked the salesman how effective the eyesight was with snow covered roads and he said I would probably be surprised at how well it would work. He was correct. While there are times it can't detect the lanes it does work far better than I expected.
 
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