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2005 Outback Wagon 3.0 L.L. Bean
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1,182 Posts
Time for coolant replacement. Radiator drain petcock and possible un-do thermostat housing to clear the engine block. Subaru coolant AND conditioner. Distilled water only for concentrate prevents mineral deposits.
 

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2020 Onyx
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12,676 Posts
If it seems like water then I would assume the worst - that maybe they put the wrong coolant in and had to flush it out and they just filled it with tap water. I'd at least drain the radiator and re-fill it with Subaru Super Coolant Premix.

Better yet would be to take it to a Subaru dealer or Subaru Specialist mechanic and have them do a coolant system flush and fill.
 

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2020 Onyx
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12,676 Posts
As long as you're not in super sub zero temps it will probably be ok but your coolant will be more diluted than it should be - you could add some concentrated super coolant to the mix but I'm not sure how many gallons of plain water would remain in the system to calculate how much concentrate to use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
As long as you're not in super sub zero temps it will probably be ok but your coolant will be more diluted than it should be - you could add some concentrated super coolant to the mix but I'm not sure how many gallons of plain water would remain in the system to calculate how much concentrate to use.
 

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Super Moderator
Outback 2011 3.6R Premium
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2,724 Posts
The system holds around 6 quarts in total and you should be running a 1/3 to 1/2 ratio of coolant to distilled water.

Hope this helps.

Seagrass
 
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2020 Outback Premier 2.5i
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If you live in hot climates I would not go beyond 50/50 by volume. You can raise the boiling point at 70/30 but the ability to transfer heat is less than that of 50/50, so as long as your w/pump, stat and fans are operating properly you don't need the higher boiling point as a rule I'd say. So it's easier to just mix at 50/50 - assuming you're not buying pre-mixed, in which case you don't want to dilute that at all.

IMO, you should use an antifreeze tester if you're going to be doing your own mixing/checking. It's a very inexpensive tool that will allow you to monitor high and low temp values whether you're adding/replacing or just plain monitoring. It won't tell you if the additive properties are depleted, but it will take the guesswork out of maintenance and mixing.
 

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2010 Outback 3.6R 2014 Legacy 2.5i
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I bought a 2017 Outback and the coolant is pretty low in the reserve tank. I added a couple bottles of fresh drinking water to the tank to fill it up.
Now I'm not sure what to do to get the right mix of coolant in the engine. I don't know what "type" of coolant the previous owner used. When I look in the tank and the radiator it just looks like water. Not blue or green or anything.
Should I drain or syphon out the some water and add Subaru or super blue coolant?
when did you buy it and is it still under 3/36 b to b warranty or the 5 60K power train warranty if so, back to Subaru and tell them to pressure test it hot and cold and burp the system

this is my experience

2003 Legacy EJ25 smelled like coolant on very hot days, never lost any meaningful amount
2010 Outback 3.6R smells like coolant right around the overflow bottle, have not had to add any since I got it at 140K last November. 153K
2014 Legacy FB25 smells like coolant right around the overflow bottle, added a few ounces in the last 7 years, coolant replaced in 2018 when t-stat was replaced due to failure. Car is 80K now no change

Subarus are not a 100% sealed system and they will loose a tiny bit over time from the overflow bottle due to evaporation

Subaru uses super coolant that is blue for all of their cars since at least 2010.
 
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