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I've always heard and believed that one shouldn't apply any lube or anti-seize to the threads of ones lugnuts, in that you couldn't get a good torque reading on the lubed threads.

Recently, I was installing my new winter wheels (with new Nokian WRs!), and noticed that there was a red/pink grease on all the lugnuts. This was placed there by my dealer, during the 30K servicing. I called the dealership, and they indicated that they do, in fact, apply the material (described as a silver anti-seize, but that's another issue entirely.....:eek:), to prevent corrosion and galling.

My owners manual says to never apply lube to the lugnuts, so I contacted SOA, thru the My.Subaru website, and had them research the question. The answer came back today, that "No, Subaru doesn't recommend any lube on the lugnuts".

I also asked a local tire place about it, and was told that they now see lube on the lugnuts of about one-half of the cars they work on.

What do you all think? Do I need to remove and clean the lugnuts and re-torque to proper specs, or should I just leave it alone and let it go? Do I need to go back to the dealership, with the answer from SOA?

Has there been a change of philosophy on the subject, and I just missed the memo?

Opinions, please.
 

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OK, the following is merely my opinion n foamings........


i lube the lugs, lightly, on all my cars, incl on the taper on the nut that seats against the wheel, and then wipe off excess once it's torqued. you're correct that it will screw up torque readings, but i just torque to abt 15% over spec to compensate. i haven't had any nuts loosen up in many years of doing this.

FWIW, if you worry abt lug nut torque, you're one of the few the proud oops......anyway, i have yet to see ANY comml shop, dlrship, mechanic use a torque wrench on lug nuts, air impact wrench is much more fun and faster. when i get a car new or get it back from shop, i try to retorque the lug nuts to <150 ft lb in case my lady has a flat

and what IS the current pressure in your spare?
 

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Thanks for your reply.

I guess I'm going to all the right places...my mechanic religiously uses a torque wrench. I recently went to a Discount tire, looking for hub rings, and witnessed them using a torque wrench. I've even seen the butchers at Tires Plus use one. (But they do all seem to want to set them to 75 ft-lbs.--I ask.)

And of course I use one, and even re-torque after about 100 and about 200 miles, just to be sure. I target the center of the 58-72 ft-lbs range and set the wrench for 65. With the lube present, should I be targetting the low end of the range to allow for false readings and to avoid inadvertent stud stretching? Seems like the lube would cause the reading to be low, given the amount of tension on the stud.

Would some of that silver anti-seize or a light grease be a better choice? Does any of the lube end up migrating based on braking-induced temperature increases in the wheel? It is awful close to the brake rotor, after all, and we wouldn't want any on the brakes....

To answer your challenge, I'm estimating that my spare is currently down to about 50-55, based on the time interval and reduction of ambient temperature since the last time I checked it (and it was low, coming from the factory). And my wife's was even lower.... I check tire pressure every 1-2 weeks, except in the spare. Doesn't everybody?

Any other comments out there?
 

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oops

i stand corrected. i knew abt the stretching aspect but i didn't think abt the friction-torque relationship.

guess i'll revise the plan. no wonder i haven't had any lugs loosen, says mr "do you use a torque wrench" grade A arsehole.....so much for signif other being able to remove easily.

FWIW, i haven't had any fail yet either, nor have i noticed excessive brake rotor warping and distortion despite fact that i'm overtorquing em so badly

boy do i feel stupid....:eek:
 

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I also have heard never to put anything on the stud threads. Anti-seize changes the rating of torque applied. Some people swear by it, some people swear at it. I don't use any. Brian
 

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I'd never put anything on them, that would worry me.

Although, I remember trying to get the lugnuts off of my 1940 Plymouth just after buying the car and they wouldn't budge. So I might have used something on those. I just don't remember now. I was trying to be careful since it was, and still is, my only antique car.

Found out-- a while after giving up on them ever coming off-- that they are opposite of contemporary cars, I guess, so that counterclockwise is on instead of off. I think it's only one side, I forget. I didn't even realize this was done on cars up until the '60s or '70s.

That '40 Plymouth sits idle up on blocks, unworked on, so I need to give it up to someone else. I only got the engine running okay and never got the brake master cylinder replaced so it was never driven. Tires are still old and flat. :)
 

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roo, you might try contacting people on the yahoogroup named stationwagon, they have many members who work on older cars and may have parts and information for you - or, may know someone interested in your car for parts.
 

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The_Lizard said:
roo, you might try contacting people on the yahoogroup ---8<--- someone interested in your car for parts.
Well, I've had it so long now and know now I never will do anything with it. Was a spur of the moment idea to get as a project. I'm considiering putting it on ebay to see if anyone would take it off my hands. Saw one there, that was fixed up and driveable, sell for $7000 or so recently. Paid $1250 and I'd take $500 without wincing.

Heck, I'm close to paying anyone to haul it away. I couldn't stand to keep parting it out over another long period of time. It has used up precious space on this hillside far too long as it is. Only have space for three vehicles to park here and my OBS is all that'll fit under the carport!

Thanks for the suggestion anyhow.
 

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I've been putting lube on studs for years with no problems.Every tire i pull if not new the studs the lube.If everyone did,then you would'nt have that one that comes half way off then locks up.Then you got too break the stud too get the wheel off.
 

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I normally add it to my older cars, but all of your torque specs go out the window. on newer cars with no rust on the threads leave it alone and you'll be happy.
 

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as a previouse shop owner and having read volumes of info on this issue i will add my "no" to the oil/grease/antisieze issue. to many variables to deal with and all manufacturers say no also. for me it also involved liability issues.
if yer concerned about corrosion the fix is to take off the nuts/bolts and reinstall them every few months or so. also my shop and many that i've seen use torque wrenches. our air guns are adjustable so they have max off power but minimal on power so just cuz one sees the gun used don't always mean much.

george
 

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a little bit of surface rust can be a bit of a problem that the lube can fix but after that just replace them.

by the way..... I love the lube on my lugnuts..... sorry..... it had to happen at some point in this thread
 
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