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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

Has anyone gone through a Manufacture Buyback/ exchange/replacement of their Subaru.
I Did find a one person on the site who did, but was wonder of other experiences with the process.

Thanks,
Jan
 

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2019 Subaru Forester Premium, Crystal Black Silica, Pkg 15
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1,708 Posts
Mind sharing the details? Issue with something like oil consumption or lemon law?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm not sure where you live, but here in Oregon a mis-reading fuel gauge is hardly a matter that would qualify under the lemon law:

https://www.doj.state.or.us/consumer-protection/motor-vehicles/lemon-law/

Well in that case I'm glad I don't live in Oregon. (I great state if you don't have car issues)

https://california.thelemonlawattorneys.com/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMInIqmubLq2AIV3rXACh2AsAZKEAAYASAAEgJcEPD_BwE

Lemon Law Presumption*
Within the Song-Beverly Act, there is a presumption guideline
wherein it is presumed that a vehicle is a “lemon” if the following
criteria are met within 18 months of delivery to the buyer or
lessee or 18,000 miles on the vehicle’s odometer, whichever
comes first:

The manufacturer or its agents have made two or more
attempts to repair a warranty problem that results in a
condition that is likely to cause death or serious bodily
injury if the vehicle is driven;

The manufacturer or its agents have made four or more
attempts to repair the same warranty problem; or

The vehicle has been out of service for more than 30
days (not necessarily all at the same time) while being
repaired for any number of warranty problems; or

The problems are covered by the warranty, substantially
reduce the vehicle’s use, value, or safety to the consumer
and are not caused by abuse of the vehicle;

If required by the warranty materials or by the owner’s
manual, the consumer has to directly notify the
manufacturer about the problem(s), preferably in writing.
The notice must be sent to the address shown in the
warranty or owner’s manual (for bullets 1 and 2).
If these criteria are met, the Lemon Law presumes that the buyer
or lessee is entitled to a replacement vehicle or a refund of the
purchase price. However, this presumption is rebuttable. The
manufacturer may show that the criteria has not been met (for
example, because the problems are minor) and therefore, the
buyer or lessee is not entitled to a replacement vehicle or refund.
 

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34 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I'm not sure where you live, but here in Oregon a mis-reading fuel gauge is hardly a matter that would qualify under the lemon law:

https://www.doj.state.or.us/consumer-protection/motor-vehicles/lemon-law/

Well in that case I'm glad I don't live in Oregon. (I great state if you don't have car issues)

https://california.thelemonlawattorneys.com/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMInIqmubLq2AIV3rXACh2AsAZKEAAYASAAEgJcEPD_BwE

Lemon Law Presumption*
Within the Song-Beverly Act, there is a presumption guideline
wherein it is presumed that a vehicle is a “lemon” if the following
criteria are met within 18 months of delivery to the buyer or
lessee or 18,000 miles on the vehicle’s odometer, whichever
comes first:

The manufacturer or its agents have made two or more
attempts to repair a warranty problem that results in a
condition that is likely to cause death or serious bodily
injury if the vehicle is driven;

The manufacturer or its agents have made four or more
attempts to repair the same warranty problem; or

The vehicle has been out of service for more than 30
days (not necessarily all at the same time) while being
repaired for any number of warranty problems; or

The problems are covered by the warranty, substantially
reduce the vehicle’s use, value, or safety to the consumer
and are not caused by abuse of the vehicle;

If required by the warranty materials or by the owner’s
manual, the consumer has to directly notify the
manufacturer about the problem(s), preferably in writing.
The notice must be sent to the address shown in the
warranty or owner’s manual (for bullets 1 and 2).
If these criteria are met, the Lemon Law presumes that the buyer
or lessee is entitled to a replacement vehicle or a refund of the
purchase price. However, this presumption is rebuttable. The
manufacturer may show that the criteria has not been met (for
example, because the problems are minor) and therefore, the
buyer or lessee is not entitled to a replacement vehicle or refund.
 

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2008 OB Limited 2.5i, Portland OR USA
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6,114 Posts
Well in that case I'm glad I don't live in Oregon.
On that point, we agree.

[....... Long quotation of California lemon law statutes......]
You ought to read the very last sentence of what you quoted: "The manufacturer may show that the criteria has not been met (for example, because the problems are minor) and therefore, the buyer or lessee is not entitled to a replacement vehicle or refund."

It's highly unlikely that an inaccurate fuel gauge is going to qualify as anything but "minor".

Just what are you after here?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
This is not a minor problem
http://www.subaruoutback.org/forums/138-gen-5-2015-present/427937-brand-new-2017-2-5-fuel-gauge-problem.html

The Dealer told me they they can't figure out why they can't get this to corrected.

So in your opinion a Fuel Gauge that goes from full to 3/4 quarters and back again at various mileage is not a issue

Sometimes I fill is up and at any where from 40 miles to 60 it show full then 2 miles later it shows 1/2 a tank and fluctuates back and fourth.
In my short life I have never had a car that ever remotely had this type of issue.
This is not a minor issue .
 

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On the Super Mod Squad
2002 Pair: 3.0 VDC Wag & 2.5 Limited Sedan
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26,193 Posts
years ago jeep grand cherokees use to run out of gas on the highway, with their gauges stuck around 1/2 (or so??)

chrysler fought off a safety recall suggesting the gauge is not a safety item. it is a luxury item. (I guess vs. a wooden stick down the top of the tank, or someone writing their odometer reading when they filled and calculating how far they should go before a tank ran out.....like if they had no gas gauge at all.

problem is. some owners did not know it was not working until theirs died in the road. (imagine that happening in crowded 70mph traffic).
 

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This is not a minor problem
http://www.subaruoutback.org/forums/138-gen-5-2015-present/427937-brand-new-2017-2-5-fuel-gauge-problem.html

The Dealer told me they they can't figure out why they can't get this to corrected.

So in your opinion a Fuel Gauge that goes from full to 3/4 quarters and back again at various mileage is not a issue

Sometimes I fill is up and at any where from 40 miles to 60 it show full then 2 miles later it shows 1/2 a tank and fluctuates back and fourth.
In my short life I have never had a car that ever remotely had this type of issue.
This is not a minor issue .
For those of us where the words, "in my short life" was decades ago, a fluctuating fuel gauge was perfectly normal on cars of the 60's and 70's.

It's little more than a minor annoyance. Not worthy of a buyback demand.
 
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2001 Outback 5 speed, 2000 Outback Automatic, 2002 Legacy Wagon Automatic. All 2.5L
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For those of us where the words, "in my short life" was decades ago, a fluctuating fuel gauge was perfectly normal on cars of the 60's and 70's.

It's little more than a minor annoyance. Not worthy of a buyback demand.
We had a 68 firebird where the fuel gauge would fluctuate under acceleration or braking. Might have done so on cornering... eyes forward was a thing then so we never knew.
 
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